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Preview: 2025 Bindings and the SkiTalk Influence.

If you yell loud enough, eventually they will listen or the squeaky wheel gets the grease and manufacturers just want to shut us up and appease us. Either way you look at it, manufacturers are listening to what is said on SkiTalk, specifically when it comes to bindings. All four major binding brands, Look, Marker, Salomon and Tyrolia have made changes for 2025 that we have been clamoring for on these pages for years. Here is a break down of what we have been saying and asking for from each brand.

Look
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There is no question of the influence we have had with Look since we launched our platform in 2015. The “Bring Back the Pivot 15” campaign with the Forza and the mortally receptive 6-15 single pivot to version of the Pivot 18. An all metal toe highest performance version that was not limited to those who do not need to run their bindings at a III+ setting.

Since the first push, we started looking for a heel design that allowed the skier to use their poles to release out of the heel without making it look like a Rottweiler was using the heel as a chew toy. Look used a metal heel cup on the Pivot heel back in the 1980’s with the RS heel, that metal cup went away for decades and while it is used on the SPX heel, it was never brought over to the Pivot, until we made noise. Along with other significant changes for the Pivot collection and speficially the 2.0 models for this coming year like doubling the adjustment range of the Pivot’s heel from about 8 mm to about 20 mm and offering a 105 mm brake option, the Pivot 15 (and 18) 2.0 is experiencing its biggest changes since adding the Pivot 15 to the collection.

What we would like to see next: Without sharing what we do know is coming down the road, we still would like to see an 85mm brake option for the Pivot. There are a lot of skis in the low to mid 80 mm range including Dynastar’s own M-Cross 82 and Rossignol’s upcoming Arcade 84 that would benefit from a Pivot and the 75 mm and 95 mm brake options are just not right.

Pie in the sky request: Return of the junior Pivot, yes at one time there was a 2-6 Pivot and also we would like to see the SPX evolve the collection to all adapt the Rockerace short mount distance design.

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Marker
Demo bindings have one purpose and that is to demonstrate a skis performance and characteristics, hell, “demo” is short for demonstrate. Marker’s affiliate ski companies specifically K2 and Volkl insist that their skis be tested and reviewed with Marker bindings, their feeling is that "the skies were tested and designed with Market bindings therefore they should be reviewed with Marker bindings" while we respected their wishes, there was a problem. In our experience, the demo versions of Marker’s Royal bindings skied dramatically different than their retail counterparts in that the binding delta’s were significantly different. This created situations where the Royal demo bindings had a negative delta and the retail versions had a positive stance. This difference created a dramatic difference in how a ski being demoed performed. When I brought this to Marker’s attention back in 2020 at the introduction of the Mantra M6, I initially felt that the observation fell on deaf ears but the Germans are calculating and along with a continued level of our soapbox standing changes came.

When we were at Volkl’s headquarters in New Hampshire for the introduction of the 2024-25 models, Marker’s Product Manager was excited to tell me that they made the change to their Royal demo bindings stance to emulate the retail versions. There was about a 5 mm change in the toe rail to go from a 2 mm negative delta to a 3 mm positive stance which is near identical to the retail offerings. This change was noticed immediately when we tested the new Mantra M7 96 and Secret 96.

What we would like to see next: In the past few years, Marker has offered their proven two stage heel for the Squire model for ease of entry, it is time to not only to offer it on the rest of the Royal collection but to consider to make the heel standard on the Griffon and Jester too. The two stage heel is a proven design and the heel for their full on race bindings. If Marker wants to stay with the single pivot point Royal heel, consider changing the heel treadle to point out flat or downward which will make it less likely to grip on the bottom of the boot for a smoother entry.

Pie in the sky request: We would like to see more brake options for the Comp collection, there is a reason that the Comp 20 and Comp 30 were the binding of choice for legends Shane and Plake.

Salomon
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A few years ago we commissioned our resident graphics artist extraordinaire @Dave Petersen to design a heritage graphic Salomon Sth2, we picked three iconic Salomon bindings, the silver/orange 727E, white/red 747E and yellow/black 997E. We sent the designs to Salomon and didn’t hear back …very well because the Sth2 was being phased out for the Strive but Salomon kept our designs in their back pocket. In the meantime, the Product Manager at the time mentioned that with the new Strive materials that coloring the body of the binding was not possible, either he was pulling me off of the scent or the engineers found a way. Either way, we now have a white/red 747E version of the Strive 16 MN.

What we would like to see next: Like with the 85 mm brake suggestion for the Pivot, an 80-85 mm brake for the new Icon 12 and 15 for the mid 80 mm ski offerings is needed.

Pie in the sky request: A heritage collection based on the Sth Steel, maybe 100 pairs a year.


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Tyrolia
In the past, Tyrolia was one of the most inconsistent brands for delta in their bindings not just as a brand, but even in model ranges, the old Attack 11 was a significantly different delta than the rest of the Attack offerings, fortunately that has changed, the collection is now much more consistent across the collection.

Fast forward to today, addressing delta has been a high priority of Tyrolia of recent, could it be because we have been so adamant of the topic when people were considering system skis that had Tyrolia’s PRD bindings well, this is Tyrolia’s big change for 2025 with new plates not only for their Head skis but also new plates for their partners brands such as Fischer and Elan. These new plates are designed to create identical deltas no matter the boot sole length (BSL) of the skier.

What we would like to see next: We would really like to see the Protector heel standard heel in all of the system ski offerings. Tyrolia obviously has a winner in this design.

Pie in the sky request: Bring back the Mojo 15 toe. It is one of the "Four Horseman" of iconic bindings.

As @Tricia says, "Credit … blame … it is a fine line". Some brands have given us credit for these changes some have blamed is for being so vocal (or Volkl?) about forcing their hands by addressing the elephant in the room. We are not making these suggestions to just hear ourselves talk but to make their products better and to make the skiers’ experience better … and we are still going to continue to try to make your experience better .. even if it does ruffle feathers and we get the occasional eye roll from the some of the brand’s product managers again, when we have their ear, we will keep making suggestions, all on your behalf. And before you ask, unfortunately, we have not received dollar one for any of these these bindings.
About author
Philpug
I started skiing in the mid-70s in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania; from then on, I found myself entrenched in the industry. I have worked in various ski shops from suburban to ski town to resort, giving me a well-rounded perspective on what skiers want from their gear. That experience was parlayed into my time as a Gear Review Editor and also consulting with manufacturers as a product tester. Along with being a Masterfit-trained bootfitter I am a fully certified self proclaimed Gear Guru. Not only do I keep up with the cutting edge of ski gear technology, but I am an avid gear collector and have an extensive array of bindings as well as many vintage skis.

Replies

Good rundown. Thank you. Kudos for your work to get them to build the bindings with consistent deltas.
Reminder--Rossi owns Look & Dynastar. (Is Look the only binding that doesn't supply other ski makers for ski & binding packages?)
--Marker, K2, & Völkl have the same owner. Marker has contracts with Nordica/Blizzard and others to supply bindings. I really like the double-action Marker heel that I've had on some rental skis (and the delta of that Marker-on-Volkl RaceTiger system was just right for me).
--Head owns Tyrolia. As noted, several ski makers have contracts to put Head/Tyrolia bindings on their skis including Kästle. (Is Tyrolia the only binding maker to put the ski brands' name on the bindings?)
--Salomon & Atomic have the same owner, and the bindings (I believe) are identical. (My Salomon-on-Stöckli Strive bindings have the Salomon name.)
 
Good rundown. Thank you. Kudos for your work to get them to build the bindings with consistent deltas.
Reminder--Rossi owns Look & Dynastar. (Is Look the only binding that doesn't supply other ski makers for ski & binding packages?)
--Marker, K2, & Völkl have the same owner. Marker has contracts with Nordica/Blizzard and others to supply bindings. I really like the double-action Marker heel that I've had on some rental skis (and the delta of that Marker-on-Volkl RaceTiger system was just right for me).
--Head owns Tyrolia. As noted, several ski makers have contracts to put Head/Tyrolia bindings on their skis including Kästle. (Is Tyrolia the only binding maker to put the ski brands' name on the bindings?)
--Salomon & Atomic have the same owner, and the bindings (I believe) are identical. (My Salomon-on-Stöckli Strive bindings have the Salomon name.)
How about a challenge for Tyrolia engineers: lower the stack height of the protector series, offer a women’s version and also offer a higher end light weight Attack version.
 
How about a challenge for Tyrolia engineers: lower the stack height of the protector series,
With the main mechanism under the heel getting much lower is difficult.
offer a women’s version
There are lighter, lower DIN versions now and coming.
and also offer a higher end light weight Attack version.
The high end Attacks are already pretty light expecially compared to their full racing counterparts. IMHO there will be a cost in safety and performance to shed much more weight. To quore Boris the Blade, "Weight it reliability".
 
With the main mechanism under the heel getting much lower is difficult.

There are lighter, lower DIN versions now and coming.

The high end Attacks are already pretty light expecially compared to their full racing counterparts. IMHO there will be a cost in safety and performance to shed much more weight. To quore Boris the Blade, "Weight it reliability".
I
With the main mechanism under the heel getting much lower is difficult.

There are lighter, lower DIN versions now and coming.

The high end Attacks are already pretty light expecially compared to their full racing counterparts. IMHO there will be a cost in safety and performance to shed much more weight. To quore Boris the Blade, "Weight it reliability".
Hi Phil
You’re right the mechanism is pretty thick!
The TYROLIA has a 32mm stand height
The Marker Griffon is 24- can you tell the difference on a 112 wide big mountain ski?
4frnt Hoji 184
Thanks!
 
No disrespect intended, but you believe these multi national companies made these technical changes because of your website?
 
My first real performance bindings were hand me down look nevadas on hand me down rossi strato 102s then 105s which I started racing on. Glad to see the look pivot is coming back.
 
Why are there limited brake options on many of the bindings? Is there something difficult about bending a few different lengths of steel into a U shape and adding a SKU, or am I missing something?
 
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Why aren't demo bindings more common? It makes it easier to resell skis since skis are very subjective and makes it easier to try skis of friends. And it shortens the life of the skis. For example, I see so many listings on the marketplace where you have to get the bindings remounted, which adds to the cost of buying second hand. And since skis can only be redrilled/remounted like up to 3 times, than doesn't that cut into any many "owners" it potentially have? Cuts the life of the ski way too short. Also, another way to drive down costs is if you could buy demo plates for other/new skis and be able to remove your toe/heel pieces and put them on another pair of skis with the plates on them. Would be a nice way for people to have one set of toe/heel piece they could just move around between various skis instead of having bindings on all skis. Would love to get insight/thoughts are to perhaps what I'm not understanding about this sport/industry. Thanks.

Disclaimer/FYI...I'm pretty new to skiing (only been skiing for 2 seasons). Skis and bindings are expensive.
 
Why aren't demo bindings more common?
For one, cost, they are more expensive. Second, they can create a disconnect with the ski.
It makes it easier to resell skis since skis are very subjective and makes it easier to try skis of friends.
Resale is not a concern for the brands.
lso, another way to drive down costs is if you could buy demo plates for other/new skis and be able to remove your toe/heel pieces and put them on another pair of skis with the plates on them. Would be a nice way for people to have one set of toe/heel piece they could just move around between various skis instead of having bindings on all skis. Would love to get insight/thoughts are to perhaps what I'm not understanding about this sport/industry.
When there are disclaimers on hemorrhoid creme that state, "Do not injest", you expect the average comsumer to be able to move bindings from one ski to another? Also most people do not want the hassle of carrying multiple brakes (and a screw driver to remove the brakes (from some brands)) with them for different width skis. This is before the liablitly issues.
 
For one, cost, they are more expensive. Second, they can create a disconnect with the ski.
Hmmm, don't know if I understand the disconnect part yet. Haven't skied enough to have that knowledge.

Resale is not a concern for the brands.
Yes, agree. Hahaha. Not in the brands interest. I was thinking more as a consumer.
When there are disclaimers on hemorrhoid creme that state, "Do not injest", you expect the average comsumer to be able to move bindings from one ski to another? Also most people do not want the hassle of carrying multiple brakes (and a screw driver to remove the brakes (from some brands)) with them for different width skis. This is before the liablitly issues.
LOL. totally forgot about the diff width and brake sizes. Haha. Also is the brake only to stop the ski from being lost on a slope should they come off? Like if a leash else was used to tether the ski to the skier's boot, would that eliminate the need for brakes????
 
Like if a leash else was used to tether the ski to the skier's boot, would that eliminate the need for brakes????
Hmmm, you be on to something. Oh, 1972 called ... they want their safety straps back. ;)
 

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