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Do you really need that third, fourth, or even fifth pair of skis? Hell no. Because in two months you are going to sell them anyway. For less than the price of a new pair of skis (and not much more than a used pair), you could have access to literally dozens of new resorts to ski. Gear might feed the brain, but actually skiing feeds the soul. You might have fond memories of a piece of gear, but isn't it the experience that you really remember? Wasn’t it more about the powder day at Big Sky or the vastness of Vail's Back Bowls on a bluebird day. And in these memories, do you even remember what skis you were on? or what jacket you were wearing? And if you do remember, did it really matter? It was the experience.

We talk about the golden age of skiing ... right now, we are in the golden age of skiing access. We have the opportunity to ski thousands of acres for less than some single passes used to cost, and that isn’t even taking inflation into account. With passes like the Epic or Ikon or Mountain Collective, we have the golden ticket to ski all over the world.

Justification and rationalization. "I neeeed that new carbon/unobtanium 120mm powder ski, with the new Tecneon 17.5 binding." Well, no; you want it, because if you get it, it will snow and face shots of you will go viral and you will be an internet sensation .... Sorry, that ain’t happening (and if you were that good, you would be getting the gear for free). I digress a bit. It is the powder shot that you will remember, not the ski. "But that pass isn’t close to home; I will never use it." Well, if you have the pass, you will find a way to use it. These multiresort passes give you a reason to travel and experience another mountain. Skiing is about experiencing. Seeing the blues of Lake Tahoe as you view it from the top of Squaw Valley, or sensing that you are skiing right into the lake when you are at Heavenly. Feeling the rawness of Jackson Hole -- and the pucker when you are standing at the top of Corbett's Couloir (right before you back away). Riding the Peak to Peak gondola that spans between Whistler and Blackcomb. People-watching on the streets of Aspen. Skiing at Alta absent the fear that you will be taken out by a snowboarder. All of these experiences are available to you for less than the cost of the average price of a pair of skis.

As many gearheads as we have here, not one of us will be lying on our deathbed thinking, “Remember the MacroMac 2500? That was one helluva ski.” No, we will be thinking ”Remember the Tahoe Gathering when it didn’t start snowing until the first day and didn’t stop for the whole trip? That was one helluva trip.”
About author
Philpug
I started skiing in the mid-70s in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania; from then on, I found myself entrenched in the industry. I have worked in various ski shops from suburban to ski town to resort, giving me a well-rounded perspective on what skiers want from their gear. That experience was parlayed into my time as a Gear Review Editor and also consulting with manufacturers as a product tester. Along with being a Masterfit-trained bootfitter I am a fully certified self proclaimed Gear Guru. Not only do I keep up with the cutting edge of ski gear technology, but I am an avid gear collector and have an extensive array of bindings as well as many vintage skis.

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Keep the excellent articles coming! It is the first thing I check when I open PugSki now.
Philpug
Philpug
Thank you, we will keep them coming.

Replies

Spot on!

I learned this lesson with music gear in the 80's, that it's all in the hands and not in the gear ;-) The same applies with any endeavor from cycling to music to skiing to painting or photography. That said, good gear, smartly purchased is worth it's weight. Spending some time to research one's needs and requirements is important. Hanging out with knowledgeable folk and listening to their experiences is also a valuable thing, but the where the rubber meets the road is in the doing. Purchase wisely, but make the most of it by doing. Damn if I don't need to listen to my blather!
 
The only bummer about the passes is they stop the sales early. I decided about 2 days after sales of Epic passes to do a trip to Vail to visit friends. If I had bought a pass I would have skied other areas and made a couple of extra trips.

I may still buy some new skis though.
 
The only bummer about the passes is they stop the sales early. I decided about 2 days after sales of Epic passes to do a trip to Vail to visit friends. If I had bought a pass I would have skied other areas and made a couple of extra trips.

I may still buy some new skis though.
Yeah, I cannot disagree, I see no reason why passes shouldn't be on sale later into the season but at an escalating price...to say 3/31...the offer a spring option at maybe the early season discounted price. But, people way above my pay grade are using their 16G abacuses and are doing their diligence.
 
Yeah, I cannot disagree, I see no reason why passes shouldn't be on sale later into the season but at an escalating price...to say 3/31...the offer a spring option at maybe the early season discounted price. But, people way above my pay grade are using their 16G abacuses and are doing their diligence.

I know there is an analytic here that drives the behavior and I understand it however a little more time would be nice.
 
I know there is an analytic here that drives the behavior and I understand it however a little more time would be nice.

But your case is the whole reason to have a cut off. They don't in general want one off tourists benefitting from the deal unless they have locked them in early and therefore can show it in their forecasts. And once bitten, chances are you'll commit a little sooner next year.

And if they don't have the jeopardy of the when its gone its gone people drift on the basis of the "so what if it costs me another $50 to decide later" and ultimately pass sales decline.

What I don't think we'll see is Epic and Ikon falling out of step with cutoffs - so expect a bit of slippage as they play brinksmanship with "special deadline extensions"
 
But your case is the whole reason to have a cut off. They don't in general want one off tourists benefitting from the deal unless they have locked them in early and therefore can show it in their forecasts. And once bitten, chances are you'll commit a little sooner next year.

And if they don't have the jeopardy of the when its gone its gone people drift on the basis of the "so what if it costs me another $50 to decide later" and ultimately pass sales decline.

What I don't think we'll see is Epic and Ikon falling out of step with cutoffs - so expect a bit of slippage as they play brinksmanship with "special deadline extensions"

I totally get that. I made my decision in mid December though not last week. For me until the end of December would be nice.
 
Nothing wrong with buying more skis if you can afford it. I try to buy used demos when possible (only if in good shape) to save the immediate depreciation when you drive new skis off the lot, and since demo bindings allow easy adjustment for others I enjoy sharing the bounty with friends who enjoy the chance to ski different skis. More fun when shared...
 
My favorite saying... "It's the Indian, not the arrow".

Hope that's not offensive in the parlance of our times.
 
Absolutely!
I can remember moments -sometimes lasting only a few seconds -of skiing joy from every decade Since the ‘70’s. The earliest ones are a mix of accomplishment and camaraderie. I remember last runs of the season, skiing in shorts and hiding out to ski in moonlight long after the lifts had shut down. Later, these memories are more family oriented like the smiles on my kids faces when it all clicked in . If I thought about it ,I could probably come up with what was on my feet at any given time but the memory of the experience is a movie montage which requires no effort to recall.
I agree ,It’s about the experience, not the stuff.
 
Very timely....I was contemplating the Stockli AX skis that are available. But...I'm happy with what I have and would rather spend it on a trip Thanks for confirming that decision!
 
And to weigh in on the jist of the article, the hot trend is to spend money on experiences rather than things.

But everyone is entitled to their own set of priorities. I cheap out on gear (but not too cheap) and spend on passes. Like $100 a year on skis (amortized, and including resale value, but not tuning and other maintenance) and ~$2k/year on passes (or about $20 a day).

YMMV.
 
Very timely....I was contemplating the Stockli AX skis that are available. But...I'm happy with what I have and would rather spend it on a trip Thanks for confirming that decision!

You will not regret buying the AX tho...

I have no idea what you have but there is about 90% chance the AX will be a cut above that in overall experience :):)
 
Yes and no.

No matter how many ski days you clock or how many passes you buy, chances are the overall experience will be mighty unsatisfactory if you are on bad boots or skis.
Good boots and good skis are worth their weight in gold.
 
You will not regret buying the AX tho...

I have no idea what you have but there is about 90% chance the AX will be a cut above that in overall experience :):)
Agree 100%. I sold a pair of 1st Gen Pinnacle 88s that I never really enjoyed and got a deal on a pair of Laser AXs with Tyrolia railed bindings at the end of last season. Even with this abbreviated season, I can say the AXs are AMAZING. Skied my tail off at Sun Peaks in Feb, absolutely love them. Can't wait to take them to a ski camp next season (once all this COVID 19 crap dies down)!
 
Sounds like the right place to speak to others with gear addiction. In my last cycle of ski buying I was searching for a certain kind of mogul/firm condition ski for what seemed to be about 50 60% solution I ended up buying 5 pair over 3 year first with 4frnt MSP, Raven, Originator,
IMG_20181103_172223_870.jpg
Masterblaster and ending with Allplay. Of these the MB stands out for stability and hold on the crispy and moguls at 95 waist. Firmer ski than I sought out in the beginning but I love these skis! 187cm. Still not used to the Allplay yet, seem good in softer snow so far.
 

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