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“I ski blacks”

KevinF

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I remember skiing with Bob Barnes one time who used to work at Breckenridge. He had a student who came in with a "I am the greatest" attitude. Anyway, Bob took him to Devil's Crotch (a rather epic bump run for those who haven't had the pleasure), skied it non-stop to the bottom... and waited. Took his skis off, grabbed a snack, waited some more, etc.. His very humbled student eventually showed up and at that point was willing to learn. I remember Bob saying that the rest of the lesson was very productive.

I assume Bob had done some analysis to determine that Devil's Crotch would be a humbling, albeit safe, opportunity to show his student that there was much left to learn. As someone mentioned earlier, there is a vast, vast gulf between "pretty good" and "really good".

The whole terrain labels thing doesn't really tell you anything about how somebody skis. I had an opportunity to ski a few runs with Stu Campbell as part of the old Stowe ESA's back in the day. His favorite run at Stowe was Lullaby Lane, a run that's about as steep as its name implies. If you couldn't learn from him -- well, I feel sorry for you.
 

KingGrump

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I remember skiing with Bob Barnes one time who used to work at Breckenridge. He had a student who came in with a "I am the greatest" attitude. Anyway, Bob took him to Devil's Crotch (a rather epic bump run for those who haven't had the pleasure), skied it non-stop to the bottom... and waited. Took his skis off, grabbed a snack, waited some more, etc.. His very humbled student eventually showed up and at that point was willing to learn. I remember Bob saying that the rest of the lesson was very productive.

I assume Bob had done some analysis to determine that Devil's Crotch would be a humbling, albeit safe, opportunity to show his student that there was much left to learn. As someone mentioned earlier, there is a vast, vast gulf between "pretty good" and "really good".

At Taos, we called that attitude adjustment. Especially for first timers. Regardless of level.

I believe @mdf was in on one of those attitude adjustment session as part of the adjustment team.
 

slowrider

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Teaching high school kids to do drills that have very limited attention span.
Ok, let's free ski a run over here(cut up wet snow on a advanced run. I went last stopping to check on our skiers. Are you OK son. Uh huh. I will wait for you at the bottom. Down to the next one. You ok? Collected my class and they were all ears now.
 

AltaSkier

I stick uphill ice...
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Parking lots are always double black. More falls there than on the mountain.
That is the rationale behind GW.
I've always felt you can tell more about a person's skiing ability by the way they walk & carry their gear across the parking lot than by the way they actually claim to ski, or even ski for that matter.
 

dbostedo

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I've always felt you can tell more about a person's skiing ability by the way they walk & carry their gear across the parking lot than by the way they actually claim to ski, or even ski for that matter.
I'm sure I've mentioned this a couple of other places on here... but when there is a large group of skiers waiting to ski-off for Taos group lessons, most of the instructors will tell you they'd get almost everyone into the right groups just by looking at how they stand on their skis, and maybe move a bit around the lodge, without ever seeing them ski.
 

TheArchitect

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Parking lots are always double black. More falls there than on the mountain.
That is the rationale behind GW.

I got a concussion slipping on a sheet of ice in the Sugarbush parking lot. It had rained earlier in the day so ice with a layer or water on it. This was in regular shoes and not ski boots.
 

mdf

entering the Big Couloir
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At Taos, we called that attitude adjustment. Especially for first timers. Regardless of level.

I believe @mdf was in on one of those attitude adjustment session as part of the adjustment team.

Yeah, they farmed the work out to me. I didn't quite understand the mission, so I kept trying to help him. We were on either Ernie's or North American. He did ok at the top and fell apart as he got tired.
 

TheArchitect

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Yeah, they farmed the work out to me. I didn't quite understand the mission, so I kept trying to help him. We were on either Ernie's or North American. He did ok at the top and fell apart as he got tired.

I hate when that happens to me all the time :doh:
 

KingGrump

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I hate when that happens to me all the time :doh:

That's why I ski the Taos way.
With the Taos way, even a short fat old guy like me have no issues skiing falling down the steep bumpy tree runs.
Gravity sucks.
 

Andy Mink

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I've skied black/double black fairly well on one day and wouldn't even think about it the next. I've skied blues that are the same way. Personally, it depends on how I feel on a given day whether I'm an intermediate or advanced skier. I will never claim to be an expert. There's a thread here somewhere where attempts were given at defining "expert". I'm not sure any conclusion was ever reached. Mine would be ski the mountain consistently, in any condition.

With that in mind, @dbostedo, @Tricia, @Philpug, and I were at Palisades a couple of years ago. Conditions were pea soup/ping pong ball/flat out crappy vis with manky, chopped up terrain. In our little group we also had Daron Rahlves and his kids for a few runs. At least I think they were with us. I saw them on the chair. Once off the chair and chatting stopped Daron took off with some massively powerful skates and disappeared into the ether. I went, soon to hear more than see ZIP ZIP as his kids went by. Consistency in all conditions. When we got to the bottom he graciously allowed that visibility was a little tough. There's always a bigger, stronger, faster fish.
 

Ogg

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I've skied black/double black fairly well on one day and wouldn't even think about it the next. I've skied blues that are the same way. Personally, it depends on how I feel on a given day whether I'm an intermediate or advanced skier. I will never claim to be an expert. There's a thread here somewhere where attempts were given at defining "expert". I'm not sure any conclusion was ever reached. Mine would be ski the mountain consistently, in any condition.

With that in mind, @dbostedo, @Tricia, @Philpug, and I were at Palisades a couple of years ago. Conditions were pea soup/ping pong ball/flat out crappy vis with manky, chopped up terrain. In our little group we also had Daron Rahlves and his kids for a few runs. At least I think they were with us. I saw them on the chair. Once off the chair and chatting stopped Daron took off with some massively powerful skates and disappeared into the ether. I went, soon to hear more than see ZIP ZIP as his kids went by. Consistency in all conditions. When we got to the bottom he graciously allowed that visibility was a little tough. There's always a bigger, stronger, faster fish.
The conclusion I gleamed was that, as with many things, the higher ones skill level the greater their recognition of how far they need to go to achieve true mastery. Compared to most friends and coworkers I've skied with I could be considered an "expert". When compared to the truly good to great skiers I have had the opportunity to tag along with I suck and will always suck no matter how hard I work at it.
 

Tony Storaro

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The conclusion I gleamed was that, as with many things, the higher ones skill level the greater their recognition of how far they need to go to achieve true mastery. Compared to most friends and coworkers I've skied with I could be considered an "expert". When compared to the truly good to great skiers I have had the opportunity to tag along with I suck and will always suck no matter how hard I work at it.

I believe the biggest chasm lies not between beginners->intermediates->advanced skiers etc but between the very good skiers and true world class experts. As with any sport there are heights simply unachievable no matter how hard you try unless you are born for it-like Mikaela, Bode, Ligety, Tomba, Stenmark, Candide etc.
 

TheArchitect

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That's why I ski the Taos way.
With the Taos way, even a short fat old guy like me have no issues skiing falling down the steep bumpy tree runs.
Gravity sucks.

No matter how many times you call yourself fat it won't make it true. You ain't fat. Short and old, well...

I've skied black/double black fairly well on one day and wouldn't even think about it the next. I've skied blues that are the same way. Personally, it depends on how I feel on a given day whether I'm an intermediate or advanced skier. I will never claim to be an expert. There's a thread here somewhere where attempts were given at defining "expert". I'm not sure any conclusion was ever reached. Mine would be ski the mountain consistently, in any condition.

With that in mind, @dbostedo, @Tricia, @Philpug, and I were at Palisades a couple of years ago. Conditions were pea soup/ping pong ball/flat out crappy vis with manky, chopped up terrain. In our little group we also had Daron Rahlves and his kids for a few runs. At least I think they were with us. I saw them on the chair. Once off the chair and chatting stopped Daron took off with some massively powerful skates and disappeared into the ether. I went, soon to hear more than see ZIP ZIP as his kids went by. Consistency in all conditions. When we got to the bottom he graciously allowed that visibility was a little tough. There's always a bigger, stronger, faster fish.

Nice casual name-drop there Andy ;)
 

Crank

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I got a concussion slipping on a sheet of ice in the Sugarbush parking lot. It had rained earlier in the day so ice with a layer or water on it. This was in regular shoes and not ski boots.
We were there a few years ago ...may have been the same day, every parking lot up there was extremely treacherous. We now have microspikes!
 

surfsnowgirl

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The walk from Bromley's parking lot to the lodge if it doesn't kill you will make you stronger....... Microspikes are KING... I use them a lot from the walk to/from the BLT at Magic from our condo also.
 

Tony S

I have a confusion to make ...
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I got a concussion slipping on a sheet of ice in the Sugarbush parking lot. It had rained earlier in the day so ice with a layer or water on it. This was in regular shoes and not ski boots.

We were there a few years ago ...may have been the same day, every parking lot up there was extremely treacherous. We now have microspikes!

The walk from Bromley's parking lot to the lodge if it doesn't kill you will make you stronger....... Microspikes are KING... I use them a lot from the walk to/from the BLT at Magic from our condo also.

And for all you skiers west of the Mississippi who think we exaggerate about how bad the conditions can be here ... the evidence to the contrary is now before you.
 

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