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DanoT

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Similar soft snow experience, but with V-10: instantaneous joy with first turn in my maiden run yesterday, exactly what I was searching for.

I too was impressed when I got to demo a Head V-10. It caused me to pause and rethink if I should get a V-10 instead of a Kore 93.

I found the V-10 superior to the Kore 93 in short radius turns and about equal in long radius turns. However I felt more comfortable at speed on the Kore 93, so that is what I bought.
 

Noodler

Sir Turn-a-lot
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Head V-Series gets overlooked by skiers thinking they need the "higher" level ski, not realizing that they would be better served by a softer "carvy" ski. I have found over the years that some of my favorite skis were actually marketed to intermediates. A relaxed ski can help a skier find a higher level of ski performance by developing their skills without fear of "punishment" that the more "high-strung" skis dish out. And of course they're also cheaper, so I think they land in the sweet spot for those concerned about bang-for-the-buck.

The Head V-10 (or V-8) should be on more skiers' buy lists.
 

PinnacleJim

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Since demoing the Head V8 last December at Killington, it has been on my radar. Not a lot of shops carry them. Ended up grabbing a pair online for $487.50 with free shipping and no tax. Will have to wait until next fall to get some time on them. Should be a good complement to my Fischer Motive 95s.
 

no edge

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Head V-Series gets overlooked by skiers thinking they need the "higher" level ski, not realizing that they would be better served by a softer "carvy" ski. I have found over the years that some of my favorite skis were actually marketed to intermediates. A relaxed ski can help a skier find a higher level of ski performance by developing their skills without fear of "punishment" that the more "high-strung" skis dish out. And of course they're also cheaper, so I think they land in the sweet spot for those concerned about bang-for-the-buck.

The Head V-10 (or V-8) should be on more skiers' buy lists.

I agree with this but how do you know how a skis performance really is without skiing it. I am really enjoying my Head ti, but it is tormenting me in terrain and under certain conditions. I think of the Head Magnum. The Rally seems milder than the Ti.
 

Noodler

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I agree with this but how do you know how a skis performance really is without skiing it. I am really enjoying my Head ti, but it is tormenting me in terrain and under certain conditions. I think of the Head Magnum. The Rally seems milder than the Ti.

You don't know how a ski will behave for you without skiing it, but...

Consider that there really are no "beginner" skis left in the market these days. I would say only junior/grom skis would qualify as beginner skis. Beginner skis are very soft; especially so for the torsional stiffness. Those skis would provide cause for concern. I mention this because the "intermediate" skis are nothing like those. Unless you're skiing mach speeds on ice or taking the skis into a course, these "middle of the line" skis will most likely work for many skiers.

I would not include any of the Supershape series under an "intermediate" or mid-line ski moniker. The V Series are much more compliant, but still provide performance.
 

Andy Mink

Everyone loves spring skiing but not in January
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I would not include any of the Supershape series under an "intermediate" or mid-line ski moniker. The V Series are much more compliant, but still provide performance.
The V8 is definitely an easier, more relaxed ski than the Rally. It does give up some on the top end and I'm sure on icy conditions, but for most intermediate to advanced skiers I think the V8 (or V10) would provide a bit more of a confidence inspiring ride. The V's will forgive the oopsies that intermediate skiers will make moreso than the Supershapes.
 

dmaster

In the parking lot (formerly "At the base lodge")
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The V8 is definitely an easier, more relaxed ski than the Rally. It does give up some on the top end and I'm sure on icy conditions, but for most intermediate to advanced skiers I think the V8 (or V10) would provide a bit more of a confidence inspiring ride. The V's will forgive the oopsies that intermediate skiers will make moreso than the Supershapes.

Interesting. But is this also valid for heavy skiers ? I'm actually hesitating between the Rally and the V8.
I’m an advanced skier (level 7), 50 years old, 90kg, 190cm tall. I only ski on piste, short to medium turns, medium aggressive and no deep snow.
My current pair is the 13 year old Atomic Metron 10.
Is the V8 not going to be too soft ?
 

Andy Mink

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Interesting. But is this also valid for heavy skiers ? I'm actually hesitating between the Rally and the V8.
I’m an advanced skier (level 7), 50 years old, 90kg, 190cm tall. I only ski on piste, short to medium turns, medium aggressive and no deep snow.
My current pair is the 13 year old Atomic Metron 10.
Is the V8 not going to be too soft ?
I weighed in at a feathery 220lb when I skied the V8. At around 190 you should not find it too soft. The Rally will definitely be stout enough. If you get s chance, pick them up side by side. The V8 is significantly lighter.
 

dmaster

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I weighed in at a feathery 220lb when I skied the V8. At around 190 you should not find it too soft. The Rally will definitely be stout enough. If you get s chance, pick them up side by side. The V8 is significantly lighter.

Any idea about the weight of the Rally ? My Metron weights 3,5kg (171cm) per ski (incl binding). Had quite some fun with it but would not like to go for a heavier ski.
 

Noodler

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Interesting. But is this also valid for heavy skiers ? I'm actually hesitating between the Rally and the V8.
I’m an advanced skier (level 7), 50 years old, 90kg, 190cm tall. I only ski on piste, short to medium turns, medium aggressive and no deep snow.
My current pair is the 13 year old Atomic Metron 10.
Is the V8 not going to be too soft ?

After spending time watching a number of Tom Gellie's videos over the past few days, my view on ski flex has been "updated". I think choice of ski flex really should be based on what kind of "energy" rebound you're comfortable with (when coming through the transition of a turn). Everyone can bend just about any ski available to consumers simply by standing on the ski. Your body weight alone is more than sufficient to bend a ski. Also note that a ski can only bend until it hits the snow. Sure it might have a bit of "purchase" into the top layer of the snow, but you can't bend a ski "through the earth". To bend a ski further you must tip it to a higher edge angle. Most of us aren't skiing bottomless powder on a daily basis. ;)

So any discussion of what's the right flex for me really should focus on how much rebound energy can you comfortably handle. If you're a heavier skier, then the ski flex will have more "work" to do to unbend, thus a heavier skier should be able to handle a stiffer ski than a lighter skier with the same skills.

I should add that I don't love a ton of rebound in my skis. I find those skis significantly more tiring to ski all day. One of my favorite skis, the Stockli O Two, is quite "compliant", but still puts a nice "spring in my step" if I want it to ski it that way. Some skis are so stiff that they kind of force you to handle a lot of rebound in every turn. Just some food for thought. :)
 
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Andy Mink

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Any idea about the weight of the Rally ? My Metron weights 3,5kg (171cm) per ski (incl binding). Had quite some fun with it but would not like to go for a heavier ski.
I don't know the weights but have seen the V8 is about 30% lighter than the Rally. One nice thing about both is they come with system bindings so you have a opportunity to move the binding around on the ski to find your sweet spot.
 

Philpug

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Any idea about the weight of the Rally ? My Metron weights 3,5kg (171cm) per ski (incl binding). Had quite some fun with it but would not like to go for a heavier ski.
It will be lighter, that is for sure.
 

markojp

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Any idea about the weight of the Rally ? My Metron weights 3,5kg (171cm) per ski (incl binding). Had quite some fun with it but would not like to go for a heavier ski.

Pretty much everything other than race skis are lighter than your Metrons. The Rally isn't heavy at all.
 

Noodler

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The V8/V10 definitely have an obvious speed limit. If you like to just let your skis run and enjoy going fast then these probably are not the correct choice. If you value easy turn initiation with supple tip lead in for tighter turns at slower speeds then the V8/V10 are a good fit.
 

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