2021 Stöckli Stormrider 88

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Testing skis so you don't have to.
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FairToMiddlin: For about four years now, Stöckli has been churning out a very refined, very easygoing SR 88. When it first came out, I thought it was one of those capable skis that nevertheless took it easy on you, not urging you to pour every ounce of oomph you have into each turn (unlike the potent Völkl RTM 86). If you can remember back another four or so years beyond that, the Stormrider name did not bring such easygoing thoughts to mind.

The rep in the tent hinted that Stöckli felt it had gone a bit too far, however, and sought to remedy that for 2019. What it ended up with was un-accessiblizing done right; the incoming SR 88 is stellar.

Compared to the current/outgoing SR 88, next year’s ski is more aggressive, responses to input are more immediate, there is more power in the ski underneath your feet. And yet it didn’t feel like there is an equal increase in its neediness. This is not a ski that will wear you down; you won’t be grunting like Monica Seles as you navigate through crud, bumps, or trees. Instead, almost anything feels possible: stuff it into unknown piles of snow with confidence, and make turn shapes bigger or smaller than its stated radius. So easy was the latter, I would have tried the next size up (if they had it). I bet it would have been a pleasure.

Philpug: Stöckli went back to the drawing board after one model run of the recent Stormrider 88. This is unusual for a manufacturer, especially a premium builder that has less margin of error when building a ski (particularly in a financial sense). Stöckli decided that the lightweight balsa core was just not enough for a ski called "Stormrider," and in this category for sure.

On to the new ski. Thank you Stöckli for bringing back what I expect a Stormrider to be. Honestly, a premium ski doesn’t need to be for everyone, and the SR 88 has had its backbone returned and wants to charge again. There are plenty of skis for solid intermediates; the Stormrider needs to be earned, and the new one raises that bar up again.

Insider tip: Still one of the reference skis in the premium 88mm category​
Review updated from 2020
 
Who is it for?
Skiers who want refinement but still want to charge when in the mood. Anyone will feel like a rockstar on this.
Who is it not for?
The new SR 88 will expose your weaknesses as a skier, so unless you are comfortable with that....
Skier ability
Advanced, Expert
Ski category
All Mountain
Ski attributes
Moguls, Off Piste, Trees
Segment
Men

Specifications

HighFives
Available sizes
165, 175, 184
Dimensions
128-88-114
Rocker profile
Camber with tip rocker
Construction design
All new
Binding options
Flat
right ad

Jovica

At the base lodge
Skier
Joined
Dec 13, 2019
Posts
17
Location
Ontario, Canada
Hi,

I am looking for SR88 or SR95 as my second ski.
I am an East Coast skier, Ontario, Quebec, Vermont, 50 year old , aggressive 6'-2" 200lbs 47th year skiing (racing long time ago).
My groomed /ice ski is Stöckli Lasec CX- 170cm, an amazing ski.

What ski would be better for some softer conditions/powder, moguls, trees and even possible touring with Salomon Shift binding's?
Ski is for East Coast skiing with possible West Coast trips.

My choices are SR88 in 177cm or SR95 in 184 cm.
Unfortunately not able to test those skis, specially not this winter.

Thanks,
 

Philpug

Notorious P.U.G.
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Nov 1, 2015
Posts
26,891
Location
Reno, eNVy
Hi,

I am looking for SR88 or SR95 as my second ski.
I am an East Coast skier, Ontario, Quebec, Vermont, 50 year old , aggressive 6'-2" 200lbs 47th year skiing (racing long time ago).
My groomed /ice ski is Stöckli Lasec CX- 170cm, an amazing ski.

What ski would be better for some softer conditions/powder, moguls, trees and even possible touring with Salomon Shift binding's?
Ski is for East Coast skiing with possible West Coast trips.

My choices are SR88 in 177cm or SR95 in 184 cm.
Unfortunately not able to test those skis, specially not this winter.

Thanks,
The 95 has such a nice turn built into it and is pretty darn versatile...combine that with your size, I would go that way.
 

Jovica

At the base lodge
Skier
Joined
Dec 13, 2019
Posts
17
Location
Ontario, Canada
The 95 has such a nice turn built into it and is pretty darn versatile...combine that with your size, I would go that way.
Ok thanks
184cm probably would be perfect length for me
I would have more contact with snow on groomed and float in powder
 

Jovica

At the base lodge
Skier
Joined
Dec 13, 2019
Posts
17
Location
Ontario, Canada
one more question if you don't mind
There is a pair SR 88 2016 with marker bindings for sale $450 USD skied 2 runs so brand new , should I jump on that for now and wait for SR95 deal in the future?
It looks that those are still amazing skis
 

Philpug

Notorious P.U.G.
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Posts
26,891
Location
Reno, eNVy
one more question if you don't mind
There is a pair SR 88 2016 with marker bindings for sale $450 USD skied 2 runs so brand new , should I jump on that for now and wait for SR95 deal in the future?
It looks that those are still amazing skis
Why not both. :huh::duck:
 

Jovica

At the base lodge
Skier
Joined
Dec 13, 2019
Posts
17
Location
Ontario, Canada
that is the idea , just not sure how different "old" SR88 is compare to "new SR 88"
In my understanding those are extremly similar skis, 2 layers of titanium, top sheet directly on the top, nice flex very smooth and small rocker
I see that geometry is different , only 1mm
 

WVC7

At the base lodge
Skier
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Posts
4
Location
NH
FairToMiddlin: For about four years now, Stöckli has been churning out a very refined, very easygoing SR 88. When it first came out, I thought it was one of those capable skis that nevertheless took it easy on you, not urging you to pour every ounce of oomph you have into each turn (unlike the potent Völkl RTM 86). If you can remember back another four or so years beyond that, the Stormrider name did not bring such easygoing thoughts to mind.

The rep in the tent hinted that Stöckli felt it had gone a bit too far, however, and sought to remedy that for 2019. What it ended up with was un-accessiblizing done right; the incoming SR 88 is stellar.

Compared to the current/outgoing SR 88, next year’s ski is more aggressive, responses to input are more immediate, there is more power in the ski underneath your feet. And yet it didn’t feel like there is an equal increase in its neediness. This is not a ski that will wear you down; you won’t be grunting like Monica Seles as you navigate through crud, bumps, or trees. Instead, almost anything feels possible: stuff it into unknown piles of snow with confidence, and make turn shapes bigger or smaller than its stated radius. So easy was the latter, I would have tried the next size up (if they had it). I bet it would have been a pleasure.

Philpug: Stöckli went back to the drawing board after one model run of the recent Stormrider 88. This is unusual for a manufacturer, especially a premium builder that has less margin of error when building a ski (particularly in a financial sense). Stöckli decided that the lightweight balsa core was just not enough for a ski called "Stormrider," and in this category for sure.

On to the new ski. Thank you Stöckli for bringing back what I expect a Stormrider to be. Honestly, a premium ski doesn’t need to be for everyone, and the SR 88 has had its backbone returned and wants to charge again. There are plenty of skis for solid intermediates; the Stormrider needs to be earned, and the new one raises that bar up again.

Insider tip: Still one of the reference skis in the premium 88mm category​
Review updated from 2020
Does the SR 88 really lock you into turn. My question related to versatility. Want a ski that's great for East Coast, but won't get caught in the odd soft snow/natural mogul day. thanks Debating between this and Liberty Evolv 84 and trying to decide to $ difference is worth it.
 

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