2022 Augment All Mountain 98 Ti

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Philpug: When I first heard about the all-new AM98, I have to admit I was a bit scared. I had just skied the AM88 for a couple of days prior and I know the attention that ski demanded of me. I wondered if I really wanted to give that kind of attention to a 98mm ski. Knowing the type of ski that Augment is known for, verrrrrry traditional and demanding, I thought the 98Ti would not be the type of ski that I usually like in this category. Boy, was I wrong.

I had a list of skis to get though at Winter Park and I didn’t get on the AM98 until near the end of the day when my legs were on "E," the light was flat, and the conditions were cut up: the trifecta of “What could possibly go wrong” after a full day of skiing. Why so negative? I should been thinking, "What could go right?" And what went right was everything. The AM98 rejuvenated my energy, gave me a solid connection to the snow, which made the flat light a nonissue, and ...what crud? Hell, had I time to ski it more, it would have done my taxes, changed the oil in the SS Pugski, and had the drinks poured when we got back to the condo. Augment’s All Mountain 98Ti is a ski that dreams are made of.

Like with many premium skis, they are not constrained by piddly things and limitations like turn radiuses and running lengths, these numbers are beneath them. This is the case with the Augment AM98Ti, when you look at the rise if the tip and tail, you would think the 179cm skis short and might be nervous. Nope. 18 meter turn radius? It wil be too turny and limited. Again, nope, I was close to scaring myself...yet I was able to lay the ski over into some serious trenches. There is a calmness that this ski exudes that I have rarely felt before.

@Alexzn and I were out at Squaw last season, Alex on the 187 and I was on the 179. It every condition we took the AM98Ti in it performed stellarly. We came to the conclusion that the AM98 was a ski that was built to a standard and not to a pricepoint. The one ski we did compare it to was the Nordica Enforcer 100 and if someone built the best Enforcer they could, using the best materials they could get their hands one, damn the beancounters you would have the Augment 98Ti. As far as playfulness, I think the AM98Ti is one of the more playful 98-100's offered, the personality range of this ski is huge. Personally I gravitate to playfulness in a ski in this range and the AM delivers in spades.

Stephen:
I was able to take the AM98(187 length) out for my birthday and what a friggin treat! I own the AM88 in 179, absolutely love it, and wouldn’t change a thing. The AM98, just based on its shape, I knew would be different and it did not disappoint. Confidence inspiring doesn’t even seem to give it enough credit. I’ve been a big fan of the Augment skis and I don’t hide that fact but I cannot overstate how good this ski is. When considering skis, there is always give and take and you make choices based on the boxes you want it to check. This ski checks so many boxes it makes it an easy choice. If I had a complaint at all it would be in the playfulness category but even that seems a bit unfair because it is playful. Definitely the most playful Augment I’ve been on aside from their freestyle ski. If I’m being super picky it’s not as playful as some skis that check very few boxes in comparison. This ski gave great feedback while still remaining damp. It’s powerful when that is needed but doesn’t demand your attention all the time. Overall it’s just a dang good ski.

AlexZN: The Augment AM98Ti is not a fat race ski, its a purposely-designed-from-the-ground-up all-mountain ski. Augment still bring its top-quality construction and materials to the table and, yes, the ski is not a noodle. The result is quite spectacular, perhaps class-leading.

Andy Mink: I was able to take both the 179 and 187 up to Mt. Rose this morning. It was actually good conditions to test in. High wind, limited visibility at the top, and between 0 and 8-10" of fresh, depending on where the wind blew it. Essentially, you could go from boot deep rollers to scratched off frozen several times in one turn. Throw in soft piles for bumps, bumps hiding under soft snow, and really nice tree snow and it was truly a test of a ski's mettle.

I skied the 187s first. Blown. Away. They provide a soft yet controlled suspension over the varying snow. In the piles I could either GS turn or pivot on top. The ski just flowed over and around. On the blown off groomers with wind affected whale backs they just moved from hard to soft to hard with no problems or excitement. I took them into the trees, which had wonderful soft snow, and found I could turn them as quickly as necessary to avoid owees. Float, flow, pivot, carve.

After 3 or 4 runs I got on the 179s. I took them down the same run I just did on the 189s. Growing soft piles with crust in between. Once again, like the other day, I felt tossed about a bit. OK, what's up? I then took them down one of my favorite, very familiar runs. They were better in the chop but still not overly confidence inspiring. On the groomers I felt the same disconnect I felt a few days back.

I don't know why there is such a noticeable difference in the way these two skis feel to me with only an 8cm difference. @Philpug loves the 179 and we're almost the same weight and height. Some thoughts are binding position, boot angle, and general skiing style. My BSL is about 15-20mm longer than Phil's. With the Salomon demo bindings only having adjustment on the heel piece, I'd be skiing them a bit further back. Does it make a difference? Perhaps. My boots also have a bit more forward lean than Phil's so I'm probably a little more forward over the tip of the ski. That extra few centimeters may come into play there. And then there's style. Phil has a very easy, flowing, efficient style of skiing while I tend to muscle my way around to compensate for shortfalls in technique. That extra length may just keep me from tipping over!

I got back on the 187s and finished the morning until the lifts got put on wind hold. Trees, glades, tighter trees, piles, groomers all felt good. Even in fresh, untracked powder, these Augments feel, um, different. Silky. Quiet (they even sound different when you drop them to the snow to click in). Sooo smooth transitioning from one snow type to another. I don't think I'd want the 98 for my DD but I could be talked into it. I see more groomers than fluff so the AM88 would likely be my choice from the Augment line. The 98 would be for the skier who really likes wider skis and may have the opportunity to put that extra bit of width to use more often than not.

DocGKR: After having skied the 187cm Augment AM98 (soft flex--which really isn't soft, but I digress), I now believe the "AM" does not just refer to "All Mountain", but actually stands for "AMAZING". For several years I have been searching for a replacement for my beloved 2014 Nordica Hell & Back (185cm/98mm/21m), but none of the 90-100mm "All Mountain" horde matched the H&B's amazing capability for carving groomers while offering awesome rebound energy, fantastic mogul capability, all while being able to handle a foot or two of fresh new snow as well as punch through the chopped up aftermath.

The 187cm Augment AM98 is the first 90-100mm ski I've been on which matches or exceeds the performance of my 185cm Hell & Back. The AM98 offers very quick turn-in, with amazing edge hold and stability for such a wide ski, while offering nice rebound energy out of carved turns. The AM98's work surprisingly well in moguls and they just zoom through Spring corn and slush. I have not had a chance to ski them in fresh snow yet.
These AM98's came with the absolute best factory tune of any ski I have used or seen--bar none. These are the ski I have been searching for!

Insider tip: A Raw Pivot 15 will look so choice on these.​
 
Awards
Who is it for?
Skiers who miss the the original MX98.
Who is it not for?
Lighter, finesse skiers: to paraphrase Jack Palance, this ski craps bigger than you.
Skier ability
  1. Expert
Ski category
  1. All Mountain
  2. Powder
Ski attributes
  1. Off Piste
  2. Trees
  3. Touring/Backcountry
Segment
  1. Men

Specifications

Available sizes
171, 179, 187
Dimensions
138-98-120
Rocker profile
  1. Camber with tip and tail rocker
Construction design
  1. Carryover
Binding options
  1. Flat
right ad

Wendy

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I wrote this review before reading the review above, so I was not influenced in any way by prior conceptions.

Here’s a female perspective on the AM98 Ti. ogsmile


Year/Brand/Model: 2022 Augment AM98 Ti
Size tested: 179 cm
Location tested: Arapahoe Basin, CO
Conditions tested in: 6“ heavy powder, low angle trees, newly formed bumps, crud, refrozen AM groomers

I had heard about Augment’s ski line last season via SkiTalk’s reviews, so I was excited to try the 2022 Augment AM98 last April. I was a nervous though, because descriptions of Augment skis indicated ultra high performance, fully cambered skis requiring a lot of skill to drive. I am a 55 year old intermediate-advanced skier still getting comfortable off piste; the terrain specialty of this ski. However, when I examined the tip and tail rocker and taper, I relaxed. While Augment boasts a thoroughbred construction, the shape said, “Come out and play!”

My first run was in 6” of powder at ABasin. Immediately, the AM98 felt well balanced beneath my feet; very little adjustment in stance was needed. The skis floated in the fluff and cut through the heavier stuff easily, with a velvety smooth feel underfoot reminiscent of a Stöckli SR95 which revealed the ski’s thoroughbred nature. Turns were easy and playful, and it was there that this thoroughbred morphed into a frisky pony, with some fun kicks out of the turn. However, if I let go of the reins, the playful canter could become a gallop, taking me for a ride. Whoa, Sally! Shifting my centered stance forward a bit and distributing even pressure to both feet put me squarely back in control.

It seems the AM98 can be skied quite centered or driven more from the front, depending on snow, terrain, and desired speed. The skis pivoted easily and smeared in the trees, flexing nicely in the undulating terrain and begging to pop off some whoop-de-doos. Following Tricia through soft, cruddy bumps on the AM98 was easy and inspired confidence. On skied-off spots, and on refrozen groomers another day, edge hold was fantastic for a 98mm ski. I’d gladly own the AM98 as a Western one-ski-quiver ski; it really does it all with a sweet smoothness and playful personality as long as you hold onto the reins.

  • Who is it for: Anyone wanting both refinement and a party personality in an all mountain ski.
  • Who is it not for: Skiers on a budget, or those who prefer zero to minimal rocker.
  • Insider tip: Skis well at head height; no need to go longer due to its stability.
 
Last edited:

Skeezer

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I wrote this review before reading the review above, so I was not influenced in any way by prior conceptions.

Here’s a female perspective on the AM98 Ti. ogsmile


Year/Brand/Model: 2022 Augment AM98 Ti
Size tested: 179 cm
Location tested: Arapahoe Basin, CO
Conditions tested in: 6“ heavy powder, low angle trees, newly formed bumps, crud, refrozen AM groomers

I had heard about Augment’s ski line last season via SkiTalk’s reviews, so I was excited to try the 2022 Augment AM98 last April. I was a nervous though, because descriptions of Augment skis indicated ultra high performance, fully cambered skis requiring a lot of skill to drive. I am a 55 year old intermediate-advanced skier still getting comfortable off piste; the terrain specialty of this ski. However, when I examined the tip and tail rocker and taper, I relaxed. While Augment boasts a thoroughbred construction, the shape said, “Come out and play!”

My first run was in 6” of powder at ABasin. Immediately, the AM98 felt well balanced beneath my feet; very little adjustment in stance was needed. The skis floated in the fluff and cut through the heavier stuff easily, with a velvety smooth feel underfoot reminiscent of a Stöckli SR95 which revealed the ski’s thoroughbred nature. Turns were easy and playful, and it was there that this thoroughbred morphed into a frisky pony, with some fun kicks out of the turn. However, if I let go of the reins, the playful canter could become a gallop, taking me for a ride. Whoa, Sally! Shifting my centered stance forward a bit and distributing even pressure to both feet put me squarely back in control.

It seems the AM98 can be skied quite centered or driven more from the front, depending on snow, terrain, and desired speed. The skis pivoted easily and smeared in the trees, flexing nicely in the undulating terrain and begging to pop off some whoop-de-doos. Following Tricia through soft, cruddy bumps on the AM98 was easy and inspired confidence. On skied-off spots, and on refrozen groomers another day, edge hold was fantastic for a 98mm ski. I’d gladly own the AM98 as a Western one-ski-quiver ski; it really does it all with a sweet smoothness and playful personality as long as you hold onto the reins.

  • Who is it for: Anyone wanting both refinement and a party personality in an all mountain ski.
  • Who is it not for: Skiers on a budget, or those who prefer zero to minimal rocker.
  • Insider tip: Skis well at head height; no need to go longer due to its stability.
I currently ski the SR95 in a 175 as my DD. I have been interested in the AM98 (after having an opportunity to ski the AM77 and AM88) and wonder how the SR95 and AM98 compare. You skied the AM98 in a 179, did it feel right for you or would the 171 be a better choice for a 5’8” 150# skier who identifies with your same ability? Thanks!
 

Wendy

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I currently ski the SR95 in a 175 as my DD. I have been interested in the AM98 (after having an opportunity to ski the AM77 and AM88) and wonder how the SR95 and AM98 compare. You skied the AM98 in a 179, did it feel right for you or would the 171 be a better choice for a 5’8” 150# skier who identifies with your same ability? Thanks!
The 179 that I skied would be right, I think. It felt similar in length to the 175 SR95. IMO, the AM98 is a bit friendlier to ski but still is very smooth. I don’t think the 171 would be unstable, but perhaps not so floaty as the 179. I *think* the Augment has more rocker than the Stöckli.

FWIW: I ski a 170 Blossom Whiteout as my primary ski.
 

Alexzn

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Different personalities, in my opinion. Both have fantastic construction and damping, Augments has a much more "progressive" shape. If you like rocker and can use it, go for an Augment, if you are after more traditional feel you may like the Stöckli a tiny bit more. Both are amazing skis though. I ski Kastle MX99 which is VERY traditional, and I still loved the Augment and I would gladly own it. In my opinion, it is the best 98mm ski on the market.
 

DocGKR

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While I like a traditional feel, I far preferred the187 AM98 to the 184 SR95's--the Augments felt stronger, quicker, better in a carved turn, and offered more energy and rebound. I liked the AM98 so much I bought a pair and sold my SR95's....
 

Alexzn

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While I like a traditional feel, I far preferred the187 AM98 to the 184 SR95's--the Augments felt stronger, quicker, better in a carved turn, and offered more energy and rebound. I liked the AM98 so much I bought a pair and sold my SR95's....
I was also tempted... but I bought another Kastle MX instead :cool:. 184 SR95 skis like a 180 ski, 187 Augment skis like a 185. It's a stronger ski with a higher top end indeed.
 

Skeezer

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Wow, thank you to all that replied to my prior post, very informative. I like the SR95, it has many great qualities, excellent build, smooth, but can really challenge me in difficult terrain/conditions. The 175 length feels longer to me than my old Enforcer 100s did in 177, I think the Enforcer’s rocker profile may account for that. I skied an Augment AM88 last year in 171 and it felt like the perfect length, with lots of camber though, no apparent rocker. So maybe the AM98 will be a similar experience in the 179 length with it’s rocker profile in mind. I do know skiing the Augment AM88 and AM77 last year the build quality and way they perform is amazing, I hope I can demo the AM98 in Utah this upcoming season. I like the idea of maybe being a bit friendlier, and like some rocker in a wider ski. Thank you again Wendy, Alexzn, and DocGKR!
 

Gone Skiin'

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@Philpug This discussion brings me back to a broader discussion of skis in this waist width. If you ski Palisades Tahoe/Squaw most of the time, and already have a narrower ski in the quiver (in my case, a Stöckli AX, which I think was made and sent by the gods), are you better off with a more playful ski in the mid- to upper-90s? What's to be gained from a ski like an MX (over, say, an FX) in this width if it's not the one ski in a one-ski quiver? I think of this width as being for off piste, heavier/thicker/fresher snow, crud, etc. This is a real question, not a position or point.
 

Philpug

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@Philpug This discussion brings me back to a broader discussion of skis in this waist width. If you ski Palisades Tahoe/Squaw most of the time, and already have a narrower ski in the quiver (in my case, a Stöckli AX, which I think was made and sent by the gods), are you better off with a more playful ski in the mid- to upper-90s? What's to be gained from a ski like an MX (over, say, an FX) in this width if it's not the one ski in a one-ski quiver? I think of this width as being for off piste, heavier/thicker/fresher snow, crud, etc. This is a real question, not a position or point.
Paging @Alexzn to the SkiTalk Courtesy Phone. I ski that area a fair amount and believe that the AM98 was built for that part of the mountain.
 

Alexzn

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Here is my 0.02 on this question. I am a weekend warrior and prefer to ski off piste whenever I can, so Squaw (Palisades) snow I see is usually not ideal and more often than not it is chalky, cruddy, sunbaked, etc. My MX99 is the anchor ski in the quiver. It's the ski I always put in the car unless the conditions warrant me to use something else. A powerful wide damp ski with great edge hold works great for my typical day when I start on frozen groomers when the lifts open, then move to some barely softened up stuff off piste later in the day and may end up skiing some mashed in the afternoon. A more playful ski will be more fun on some days, but on many other days you will be left longing for stability and security. I usually prefer a ski that can go anywhere and give me confidence. To put it the other way: If you are standing on the edge of the Main Chute, or dropping into Chute75, what do you want to have on your feet?

So I prefer my main ski to be the generalist and the skis that complete the quiver to be more specilized tools. For example my powder ski is wide, light and more playful, and I use a real GS race ski on the narrow end. If you are there to bash Shirley and Granite groomers all day, your ideal anchor ski may be different. Although MX99 and and AM98 rip groomers with the best of them.

So to answer your question: if you spend most of your day in the AX terrain, your wider ski might as well be wider and way more playful than Augment 98. For the way I ski (and Phil skis), AM98 or a Kastle MX hits the bullseye on most days at Squaw. To put it another way, if you pay four figures for a ski, you better use it often, so it makes the most sense as the anchor ski in a quiver.
 

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