2023 Peak 98

SkiTalk Test Team

Testing skis so you don't have to.
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
Joined
Mar 5, 2017
Posts
960
Philpug:
Length Tested: 184
Location tested: Snowmass/Alpine Meadows
Conditions: Old chalky snow/6-8" of fresh.

I skied the 88 first and then got on the 98. The 88’s wider brother is a different animal and a strong one at that. If you watched Bode's explanation of his design philosophy, he prefers to adust the turn shape, not by sidecut, but by flex, and this is where Peak's Keyhole Technology comes into play, allowing torsional flex without compromising edge control. On harder snow, the keyhole can torsionally bend into a turn nicely and the longer radius keeps the ski going where you want it to go in deeper snow.

Having the Peak 98 in our long term test fleet I have the luxury to take it out in a multitude conditions and terrrain that I see fit. I initially took the 98 into days old bumps, crud, and mixed, and this is where the longer radius really felt at home. On the groomers, the 98 was a little more relaxed with more of a giant slalom feel ...attributes that will lend itself to wind buff and steeps. It was when I took the Peak into some deeper snow where it really started to shine and let its personality come through.
  • Insider tip: Look past the numbers, this is a much more versatile ski than the numbers dictate.
  • One thing I'd change: I'd like to see graphics that are a bit bolder and the "Keyhole" acknowledged in the graphics.
 
Awards
Who is it for?
Those who like to be in control of the shape of their own turn.
Who is it not for?
Skiers who must demo before purchasing, Peak is a direct to consumer brand.
Skier ability
  1. Advanced
  2. Expert
Ski category
  1. All Mountain
  2. Powder
Ski attributes
  1. Moguls
  2. Off Piste
  3. Trees
Segment
  1. Men
  2. Women

Specifications

right ad
Available sizes
168. 178, 184
Dimensions
128/98/116.2 @178cm
Rocker profile
  1. Camber with tip and tail rocker
Size Scaling
  1. Construction
  2. Dimensions
Construction design
  1. All new
Binding options
  1. Flat

ski otter 2

Making fresh tracks
Skier
Joined
Nov 20, 2015
Posts
2,203
Location
Front Range, Colorado
"We test things so you don't have to" is kinda a necessary strapline for a DTC brand that simply is not putting out any demo skis. And the 30 day return is from start of ski season so make your mind up by 15 Dec probably, even if you've only had a few hours on them. Plus they know damn well that few will go to the trouble of stripping bindings off to send a ski back.

Here's hoping they actually put more pairs into soft rep situations like skitalk.
Last week I got my "few" new Bode skis, along with a "thank you" letter.
(Will post pics at some point.)

Two things:
In an Included brochure was a "No Buyer's Remorse - Ever!" Notice:
"...you can return your skis for a full refund or replacement until December 31, 2022. After that,
the return policy is good for 30 days post-delivery. Save this box [the one each pair of skis was shipped in]
until you're sure." Better than some had feared.

Second, on first impression, the width dimensions are a bit unusual on the ones I got:
the tip area is not as wide relative to the other dimensions as we've come to expect in skis that have sideshape.
The tail seems almost as wide, and neither is wide relative to the waist.

This fits controlling the turn shape through flex rather than sidecut, as the reviews here have said.

So I'm looking forward to a bomber of a peak experience.
 

locknload

Out on the slopes
Skier
Joined
Feb 3, 2016
Posts
727
Location
Carlsbad
Bode promising "this it it"! We are gonna hold him to it. Lol. Thx...enjoyed the discussion...way to get some time with him and have him describe the design.
 

2SkiQuiver_GD

In the parking lot (formerly "At the base lodge")
Skier
Joined
Mar 14, 2022
Posts
4
Location
Minneapolis
Philpug:
Length Tested: 184
Location tested: Snowmass/Alpine Meadows
Conditions: Old chalky snow/6-8" of fresh.

I skied the 88 first and then got on the 98. The 88’s wider brother is a different animal and a strong one at that. If you watched Bode's explanation of his design philosophy, he prefers to adust the turn shape, not by sidecut, but by flex, and this is where Peak's Keyhole Technology comes into play, allowing torsional flex without compromising edge control. On harder snow, the keyhole can torsionally bend into a turn nicely and the longer radius keeps the ski going where you want it to go in deeper snow.

Having the Peak 98 in our long term test fleet I have the luxury to take it out in a multitude conditions and terrrain that I see fit. I initially took the 98 into days old bumps, crud, and mixed, and this is where the longer radius really felt at home. On the groomers, the 98 was a little more relaxed with more of a giant slalom feel ...attributes that will lend itself to wind buff and steeps. It was when I took the Peak into some deeper snow where it really started to shine and let its personality come through.
  • Insider tip: Look past the numbers, this is a much more versatile ski than the numbers dictate.
  • One thing I'd change: I'd like to see graphics that are a bit bolder and the "Keyhole" acknowledged in the graphics.
I watched the video that Deb Armstrong shot of Bode and Frans Klammer in the spring. Bode was on the 98, you can see lower speed "mellow" nature, but there is nothing mellow about the really quick, high edge angle, knuckle dragging rips he did so effortlessly when he jumped on the gas. Perhaps we should call the 98 Jekyll & Hyde!
Bode on 98.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Philpug

Notorious P.U.G.
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Posts
36,780
Location
Reno, eNVy
Screenshot 2022-11-23 at 6.12.41 PM.png





Long Term Update: Early season at Squ ... Palisades Tahoe. Peak publishes the radius of the Peak 98 in the mid 20 meters for the 98 and the 98 is the poster child for the statment "You cannot judge a ski by the numbers" because this ski skis so much shorter and easier than any 25 meter ski should.

Palisades conditions were typical early season in that they were doing their best to piece meal whatever terrain they could get open by not doing much damage to the limited snow that was on the gound. It was lumpy, bumpy and like 6 week old freezer burned cheap ice cream. These are the conitions that can separate an exceptional ski from just an average one and the Peak 98 stood up to the test.

Sure I could have, actually should have been on a narrower ski for the day, but we had a meeting with Andy Wirth and Michelle Parker in the AM and with a chance of skiing with her this day, I thought I would pack the Peaks. Even though she didn't come out to play, the Peak 98 didn't punish me for choosing it for the day where some "wrong" skis would.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Alexzn

Ski Squaw
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Posts
1,766
Location
Bay Area and Truckee
View attachment 183916 Long term update: Early season at Squ ... Palisades Tahoe. Peak publishes the radius of the Peak 98 in the mid 20 meters for the 98 and the 98 is the poster child for you cannot statment "You cannot judge a ski by the numbers" because this ski skis so much shorter and easier than any 25 meter ski should.

Palisades conditions were typical early season in that they were doing their best to piece meal whatever terrain they could get open by not doing much damage to the limited snow that was on the gound. It was lumpy, bumpy and like 6 week old freezer burned cheap ice cream. These are the condtions that cna separate an exceptional ski from jsut an average one and the Peak 98 stood up to the test.

Sure I could have, actually should have been on a narrower ski for the day, but we had a meeting with Andy Wirth and Michelle Parker in the AM and with a chance of skiing with her this day, I thought I would pack the Peaks. Even though she didn't come out to play, the Peak 98 didn't punish me for choosing it for the day where some "wrong" skis would.
You took a brand-new ski to Squaw in November??? To ski WRODs that they call ski runs??? Booo...:doh:
 

Alexzn

Ski Squaw
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Posts
1,766
Location
Bay Area and Truckee
I watched the video that Deb Armstrong shot of Bode and Frans Klammer in the spring. Bode was on the 98, you can see lower speed "mellow" nature, but there is nothing mellow about the really quick, high edge angle, knuckle dragging rips he did so effortlessly when he jumped on the gas. Perhaps we should call the 98 Jekyll & Hyde! View attachment 178853
I would bet that Bode Miller can do those knuckle-dragging rips on just about any ski and look just as effortless. Skis matter, but in this case it is about the pilot.
 

Philpug

Notorious P.U.G.
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Posts
36,780
Location
Reno, eNVy
You took a brand-new ski to Squaw in November??? To ski WRODs that they call ski runs??? Booo...:doh:
They weren't brand new, we had a few days on them from last year, besides all we have for testing is new gear.
IMG_0305.jpeg
IMG_0321.jpeg
 

ski otter 2

Making fresh tracks
Skier
Joined
Nov 20, 2015
Posts
2,203
Location
Front Range, Colorado
I skied the Peak 98 in a reported 4-5" of light fresh snow today, at Keystone. Parts of the runs were groomed, most were not.
This ski gets top rating from me, FWTW. (This has to be a preliminary take, since I've only been out on it for one day.)

Initially I'd ordered just the Peak 104 and 110, since I mostly am set/good with skis I have that are 98 and under at the waist, and 111 and over.

But a few months later, before my order had shipped, I noticed that Peak still hadn't sold out of their initial stock. Same offer, same price.
I gave in and ordered the Peak 98s also.
(Bode had said this was a ski that 80% of skiers [would enjoy] skiing 80% of the time. Maybe me too.)

Whatever was going on with the Peak 98, I figured it would be good for someone with a bit of race background, for starters,
given who was designing and prototyping it.

Sure enough, as with the Crosson skis, what Bode said - and demonstrated - about this Peak ski was accurate
(though not likely I'll ski it that high a percentage of my days :) ):
it's great, versatile, and a bit different at least - An all mountain ski that handles fresh snow/crud, some uneven, groomers.
It could easily be someone's daily driver, or one ski quiver. 5 stars.
(Uniform bumps and trees will have to wait for another day, or another skier.)

The first thing I noticed was it was damp, unflappable at least to start with, not pushing it.
Also, it had some float, and made the conditions I found easy.
It carved well, in a direct way that was like what a racer would want, groomer, or in new snow.
Yet it could also be skied more playfully, with slarve, a bit relaxed.
It handled the areas that had been groomed as well as any 88 ski or above in width I know of;
it did this in a way I'd thought the Stockli 88 would do, until I demoed that 88 and found I had to adjust more, make more effort.
The Peak 98 handled areas that were a bit of powder, and areas that were variable or crud.
It seemed to be completely dependable, carve or slarve, in the soft conditions I skied in today. Just tops.

Comparing the Peak 98 to other top skis of that width, at least on a preliminary basis,
I own the Blizzard Bonafide 98, and the K2 Mindbender 99, because I like them both, both differently.
The Bonafide is more dialed in overall, and is better on groomers; but the MB 99 smooth charges crud and slush with more character.
The Peak 98 is at least as dialed in as my 180 Bonafide, and carves even better, probably - at least so far.
The Peak 98, so far, may charge crud and slush as well or better than the Mindbender 99 - so far it seems to, at least with some crud; time will tell.
 

ski otter 2

Making fresh tracks
Skier
Joined
Nov 20, 2015
Posts
2,203
Location
Front Range, Colorado
Yes, sorry. 184.

I think because of the keyhole tech, it handles and charges with the quietness and stability of a longer ski, more like a 192, in that way.
But it turns easily and is quick like a 184 or shorter. It also seems to ski with the dampness of a heavier ski.
At least it felt that way in soft snow - not a complete test.

For me, a ski of that width is mostly, usually, a soft snow ski, unless the ski shows me otherwise;
I'll go narrower for harder snow, most days, if I can.
 

Philpug

Notorious P.U.G.
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Posts
36,780
Location
Reno, eNVy
@ski otter 2 will probably agree here, even though these are build at the Elan factory, the Peak 98 is not just another Elan or a rebadged Elan ... not that Elan's are bad but Peak's have their own feel for sure.
 

fix4all

In the parking lot (formerly "At the base lodge")
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2022
Posts
7
Location
SoCal
Weight comparison with similar Ti Skis? Have not checked the Peak website lately, yet that was not disclosed early on for the different models.
 

ski otter 2

Making fresh tracks
Skier
Joined
Nov 20, 2015
Posts
2,203
Location
Front Range, Colorado
Don't see the weight on the website. But I can say that by the feel, it is a fairly light ski, surprisingly - in the range of so-called modern, newer lightweight resort emphasis skis, rather than the heavier models (like the Bonafide or Enforcer 100). It is damper than those lighter weight skis, maybe almost comparable to the heavier ones because of keyhole tech; yet more precise and responsive to either race or freeride "on edge" technique than the lighterweight models of other brands, or most heavier models.


I got out on the Peak 98s again on Tuesday, 11/29, first chair, again at Keystone, except with an additional, steeper, expert run opened also.

It was in slightly heavier 4" or more of fresh powder/turned to crud/turned to skied off; and my impression was adjusted some, a bit - especially on the steeps. I wished it were slightly longer, at times - especially with GS like turns on crud steeps with some speed. (When I laid it over more it did fine again.)
 
Last edited:

fix4all

In the parking lot (formerly "At the base lodge")
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2022
Posts
7
Location
SoCal
184cm is typically on the long end of the scale for most modern skis. Based on the pics, seems like the tip & tail taper is subtle, especially on the tip. Has anyone actually measured the end tip/tail contact points? What is the effective edge length?

Would be helpful if you could pull the bindings off the rails and provide the weight for all to see. And other owners of Peak skis with different models, lengths doing the same, if it's not too much to ask.

It's frustrating that many mfg's do not post the weight of each length in their lineup or none at all (listening Peak?), but seemingly random pick one length for general specs & weight. For me, weight matters allot and could make or break the deal. Being an older skier, it can provide a more fun and safer experience. I want to control the ski and not it me. Of course, the boots & bindings all come into play, yet I'd say the skis make the most difference at the end of the day.
 
Last edited:

Philpug

Notorious P.U.G.
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Posts
36,780
Location
Reno, eNVy
For me, weight matters allot and could make or break the deal.
Are you carrying them a long distance? THIS thread is a good example of why weight can be overrated, it is not so much what the weight of something is, but where that weight is. Swing weight of a ski is more important than the actual weight.
 

fix4all

In the parking lot (formerly "At the base lodge")
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2022
Posts
7
Location
SoCal
Yes, exactly.. swing weight! Yet, overall weight usually translates to that. Of course, there's Ti frame construction and other methods used to reduce swing weight. Can't imagine a keyhole near the front binding doing much to reduce swing weight (not bashing Peak). I'm actually interested in trying out a pair. Specs leave allot do be desired. Demoing so many skis/models/lengths can be overwhelming and costly. We need a starting point and helpful to peruse sites like this and other reviews/feedback to get a ballpark idea of a ski to narrow down our choices. Carrying a heavy pair of skis could be a drag (pun intended)!
 

Philpug

Notorious P.U.G.
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Posts
36,780
Location
Reno, eNVy
Can't imagine a keyhole near the front binding doing much to reduce swing weight (not bashing Peak).
The keyhole has nothing to do with swingweight but how the ski performs.

We need a starting point and helpful to peruse sites like this and other reviews/feedback to get a ballpark idea of a ski to narrow down our choices.
What exaclty are you expecting a review to cover?
 

Sponsor

Top