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Beginner skis and info on diy ski tuning

Wendy

Resurrecting the Oxford comma
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The bench actually gets in the way. Every workbench and table top in my house is covered with some combination of tennis racquets, toolboxes, hockey helmets, pipe wrenches, paint brushes, life jackets, propane torches, extension cords, paddles and/or obsolete audio equipment. YMMV

dm
My husband’s workbench would fit right in! :roflmao:
 

cantunamunch

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Here’s the Orange Crush:

Optimal use at or above 31F


I was looking at that.

If I had OP's kit I'd be testing absorption of the OC vs Modified HC - for use as a prep wax. I know, I know, I'm exhibiting my own wax box biases. :huh: The OC sort of reads like a Swix CH10 and the Modified HC sort of reads like Toko Universal w. Moly. I'm casting new faces for the same play, sorry.
 
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Dixie Flatline

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Update: I waxed my own skis before last trip to the mountain. I used the big block of universal wax from the kit and ironed it on, then scraped it off with the plexiglass scraper. I think I used too much wax because I scraped a LOT of it back off. I had to finish real fast to prevent my wife from finding out I used the kitchen table, so I only had time to do a very quick brush with the nylon brush after scraping. I think the ski's glide got better after a few runs, maybe because the excess wax wore off?

I also tried to tune the edges just to establish the edge bevel on the skis. I marked the steel with sharpie and just used the tuner in the kit until the edges were contacted. I don't really know how to evaluate the results.

The next thing I need to learn about is bindings...my youngest daughter needs to move from 100s to 105s or 110s, using the same boots. If I buy a set of 110s, I would like to set them up for her current boots. Is that something I can do myself? My shop explained that they have a test jig that uses a sort of fake foot and actually tests the bindings force. That sounds like expensive tooling and not something I can afford to have myself, but I'm trying to figure out if I really need that or if I can copy settings from her existing bindings and do some sanity checks and that is good enough.
 

cantunamunch

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Update: I waxed my own skis before last trip to the mountain. I used the big block of universal wax from the kit and ironed it on, then scraped it off with the plexiglass scraper. I think I used too much wax because I scraped a LOT of it back off. I had to finish real fast to prevent my wife from finding out I used the kitchen table, so I only had time to do a very quick brush with the nylon brush after scraping. I think the ski's glide got better after a few runs, maybe because the excess wax wore off?

First notebook entry: Demon Universal - any idea what the air temps were? New or old snow?

I doubt you used too much unless it was dripping off the sidewalls after the iron passed over - but then I think plenty of people on this board wax too little.
 

GB_Ski

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First notebook entry: Demon Universal - any idea what the air temps were? New or old snow?

I doubt you used too much unless it was dripping off the sidewalls after the iron passed over - but then I think plenty of people on this board wax too little.

He's waxing 100cm skis, so I'm 99% sure the skis have extruded base, I don't think they'll hold much wax.
 
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Dixie Flatline

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Actually I was waxing my own 168cm skis...but I don't know anything about what kind of bases they have.

The snow was pretty new over hardpack, and air temps were below freezing but not cold, I guess high 20s.
 

KingGrump

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The next thing I need to learn about is bindings...my youngest daughter needs to move from 100s to 105s or 110s, using the same boots. If I buy a set of 110s, I would like to set them up for her current boots. Is that something I can do myself? My shop explained that they have a test jig that uses a sort of fake foot and actually tests the bindings force. That sounds like expensive tooling and not something I can afford to have myself, but I'm trying to figure out if I really need that or if I can copy settings from her existing bindings and do some sanity checks and that is good enough.

If you are having your hands full learning how to wax and tune. Leave the binding mount and testing to the shop.
 

cantunamunch

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Actually I was waxing my own 168cm skis...but I don't know anything about what kind of bases they have.

The Salomons you had above is what I assumed you were working on. Reasonable quality sintered.

The snow was pretty new over hardpack, and air temps were below freezing but not cold, I guess high 20s.

That's in the hero snow range for waxes. Universal was probably the right call.
 

Chris V.

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I had to finish real fast to prevent my wife from finding out I used the kitchen table, so I only had time to do a very quick brush with the nylon brush after scraping.
LOL!
I also tried to tune the edges just to establish the edge bevel on the skis. I marked the steel with sharpie and just used the tuner in the kit until the edges were contacted. I don't really know how to evaluate the results.
You can get a little plastic stick, I forget what it's called, that you draw across the edge. If you shave off a nice continuous ribbon, you know the edge is sharp. Otherwise....
The next thing I need to learn about is bindings...my youngest daughter needs to move from 100s to 105s or 110s, using the same boots. If I buy a set of 110s, I would like to set them up for her current boots. Is that something I can do myself?
This is a matter of your child's safety. Leave this job to the pros. They will do a fine adjustment of binding length, test forward tension, test the bindings for proper release, and set the DINs correctly for her current height, weight, and ability.
 

justplanesteve

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But just out of curiosity, what happens if you use regular Ball canning wax? Or even beeswax?

You can google, it's not just me - If you are not in competition, beeswax is a decent mid temperature all purpose wax.
I use it because I'm a cheapskate & the bees in the hives on the porch just keep producing it. My non-scientific sense (I've tried both, but the parafin was as a teenager over 50 years ago) beeswax is somewhat more durable than Ball/Gulf parafin blocks.

Chemically, Wikipedia has this generalized description of glide waxes:

Harder waxes address colder, drier or more abrasive snow conditions, whereas softer waxes have a lower coefficient of friction, but abrade more readily. Wax formulations combine three types of wax to adjust coefficient of friction and durability. From hard to soft, they include synthetic waxes with 50 or more carbon atoms, microcrystalline waxes with 25 to 50 carbon atoms and paraffin waxes with 20 to 35 carbon atoms

Beeswax has several hydrocarbon waxes in chain lengths to cover the upper-lower, to upper mid range:

The beeswax composition is: hydrocarbons (12%–16%) with a predominant chain length of C27–C33, mainly heptacosane, nonacosane, hentriacontane, pentacosane and tricosane [10]; free fatty acids (12%–14%), with a chain length of C24–C32 [11]; free fatty alcohols (ca. 1%) of C28–C35 [5]; linear wax monoesters and hydroxymonoesters (35%–45%) with chain lengths generally of C40–C48

Now to trick those busy girls into substituting some flourine atoms for some the hydrogens....

smt
 

justplanesteve

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I like to get at least double duty out of most machines, tools, benches, etc.
$2 iron from re-use store.
Busy micro crystalline wax factories are located just on the other side of wall, beyond weigh scale for product.
:)
 

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James

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I like to get at least double duty out of most machines, tools, benches, etc.
$2 iron from re-use store.
Busy micro crystalline wax factories are located just on the other side of wall, beyond weigh scale for product.
:)
27C3268A-149D-49A0-88DF-B6D7930B4EF0.jpeg

You working Japanese style sitting on the floor cross legged?
How is the plate attached to the clothes iron?
 

justplanesteve

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Skis end at about thigh height, comfortable with the iron in my hand.
It is an expedient for now, and somewhat of a joke. :)
When the shop is in steady use and heat above current 40-ish F, i really just use a bench there.
But the point is, quite simple tools and fixtures suffice, if you don't have dedicated space or budget.
One deck screw in each T support (from the chopsaw) makes it easy to move one or both for ski length.
IOW, don't let lack of "professional" tools inhibit your ambition or initiatives to get started.

I took the steam part/guts out of the iron, and bolted the 110mm x 165mm x 13mm aluminum base from the inside.
Base is tapped for 2, #10-24 screw along centerline. There are actually several holes in the iron base, and several tapped positions in the base so it can be moved for better balance if indicated. The screws are non-influencing, and the whole assembly was brought up to heat and flattened on a linisher. A ramp is easy to mill later if indicated, but so far i like bees wax better than the similar temp commercial waxes i've tried. OTOH i'm old, not a racer, nor particularly competitive.
Edges get stoned somewhat frequently, filed when necessary, and waxed "sort of" routinely.

smt
 

jt10000

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I took the steam part/guts out of the iron, and bolted the 110mm x 165mm x 13mm aluminum base from the inside.
Base is tapped for 2, #10-24 screw along centerline. There are actually several holes in the iron base, and several tapped positions in the base so it can be moved for better balance if indicated. The screws are non-influencing, and the whole assembly was brought up to heat and flattened on a linisher.
Whoa.
 

justplanesteve

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Update on beeswax:
I stand by my appreciation for the un-adulterated product for snow in ambient temps above, say, 20-25 deg F.

However, yesterday i was reminded that it is not a great low temp wax. Air temp around 2F & blowing.
Mixed real and man-made sno all night, same still blowing in the morning all over the slopes.
Felt a little like smooth sandpaper underfoot when (trying to) skating.
Colder yet this morning.....
 

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