Binding Width on Ski

Slash01z

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Hey everyone,

So I just picked up a pair of attack 14’s to upgrade from my current tyrolia’s. The attack toe is obviously much wider then the old pair and both the body and plate area hang over the edge of the ski more then my current setup. My skis or 80mm so when looking at the new toe piece I would say the toe plate portion sticks over the edge of the ski by about 3-5mm (picture makes it look worse then it is because it’s in a little narrower part of ski then where it will be mounted and it’s on top of the old binding). I’ve leaned the ski as if I was turning and don’t think it could ever catch the snow. Even looking at it with my boots I would say my boots are still as wide as the toe piece so if anything my boots would touch before i would get crossed up by catching toe pieces on each ski? Just wondering if anyone else has had a similar situation?

2nd being my last pair was more of an adjustable/demo style the stand height was probably double what it will be know. How will this affect the feel when skiing? I’m hoping it’s not much different maybe just a feel of being closer to the snow when carving?

Thanks!

42E9907B-CE51-4720-A1BE-013176531FF8.jpeg 817F412B-ACBF-4EAC-AEDF-796FA4B97105.jpeg 4844B6D0-7B62-4820-A1E6-D4A64D8A956A.jpeg
 

Philpug

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You will be fine, your boot will stick out farther and will hit the snow well before the AFD does.
 

blue

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Hey everyone,

So I just picked up a pair of attack 14’s to upgrade from my current tyrolia’s. The attack toe is obviously much wider then the old pair and both the body and plate area hang over the edge of the ski more then my current setup. My skis or 80mm so when looking at the new toe piece I would say the toe plate portion sticks over the edge of the ski by about 3-5mm (picture makes it look worse then it is because it’s in a little narrower part of ski then where it will be mounted and it’s on top of the old binding). I’ve leaned the ski as if I was turning and don’t think it could ever catch the snow. Even looking at it with my boots I would say my boots are still as wide as the toe piece so if anything my boots would touch before i would get crossed up by catching toe pieces on each ski? Just wondering if anyone else has had a similar situation?

2nd being my last pair was more of an adjustable/demo style the stand height was probably double what it will be know. How will this affect the feel when skiing? I’m hoping it’s not much different maybe just a feel of being closer to the snow when carving?

Thanks!

View attachment 174230 View attachment 174233 View attachment 174234
Looks like your old toe has vertical toe release. I wonder if attack 14 toe does too.
 

Andy Mink

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As to feel because of the different height, at 80mm under foot it will probably be negligible. If you are going the summer between skiing you probably won't even notice. If anything it might be a tiny bit easier to tip. Tiny. The one thing you may notice is if the delta (the difference in height between toe piece and heel piece) is significantly different. @Philpug will have a better idea than me but I'm guessing the two will be close.
 

Philpug

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The one thing you may notice is if the delta (the difference in height between toe piece and heel piece) is significantly different. @Philpug will have a better idea than me but I'm guessing the two will be close.
Yes, the toe is higher ... but so is the heel, both are about 5mm higher.
 

Andy Mink

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Yes, the toe is higher ... but so is the heel, both are about 5mm higher.
But the difference between the toe and heel on each binding is about the same?
 

KingGrump

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Looks like your old toe has vertical toe release. I wonder if attack 14 toe does too.

Should that matter?
What does upward release at the toe buys you?
 

blue

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Should that matter?
What does upward release at the toe buys you?
I think it reduce the slight chance of forward tumble. I saw a video of someone basically had the front side of the ski catch on something straight on and they tumbled forward with skis still intact. I have attack 13 on one of my skis, and I got pivot on my newer skis partially to avoid the slightest chance of that happening. It’s a peace of mind thing for me mostly.
 

KingGrump

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I think it reduce the slight chance of forward tumble. I saw a video of someone basically had the front side of the ski catch on something straight on and they tumbled forward with skis still intact. I have attack 13 on one of my skis, and I got pivot on my newer skis partially to avoid the slightest chance of that happening. It’s a peace of mind thing for me mostly.

Not sure I got the image right. If you are in a forward tumble (going over the handle bars, a$$ over tea kettle). I would imagine the vertical release function to be performed by the heel unit rather than the toe unit.
Sitting back and falling backward would be conceptually more beneficial with a upward release toe unit.

I have had some bindings long ago that had some sort of upward releasing toe units. Either Ess or Geze. Don't ever recalled benefitting from that specific feature.
Most modern bindings do not feature an upward leasable toe unit. I wondered if that is a cost saving move or the manufacturers do not feel it's a necessary requirement.

FWIW, I buy my bindings primary for retention purposes. My bindings are generally set several numbers above the standard DIN chart recommendations. I am not sure I am the person you should be talking to if your primary binding selection criterion is safety release in all conditions.
 

crgildart

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Not sure I got the image right. If you are in a forward tumble (going over the handle bars, a$$ over tea kettle). I would imagine the vertical release function to be performed by the heel unit rather than the toe unit.
Sitting back and falling backward would be conceptually more beneficial with a upward release toe unit.
Unless you're skiing switch :rolleyes:
 

blue

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Not sure I got the image right. If you are in a forward tumble (going over the handle bars, a$$ over tea kettle). I would imagine the vertical release function to be performed by the heel unit rather than the toe unit.
Sitting back and falling backward would be conceptually more beneficial with a upward release toe unit.

I have had some bindings long ago that had some sort of upward releasing toe units. Either Ess or Geze. Don't ever recalled benefitting from that specific feature.
Most modern bindings do not feature an upward leasable toe unit. I wondered if that is a cost saving move or the manufacturers do not feel it's a necessary requirement.

FWIW, I buy my bindings primary for retention purposes. My bindings are generally set several numbers above the standard DIN chart recommendations. I am not sure I am the person you should be talking to if your primary binding selection criterion is safety release in all conditions.
Forward tumble initiate by the front of the ski getting caught, imagine tripping on curbs. The force vector is applied downward to the front of the skis as opposed to backwards. So it’s not you flying off the skis, but the skis rotate you forward around the point where they’re caught. Idk if I described it right. I can’t find the video of the incident I was referring to.
 
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Slash01z

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You will be fine, your boot will stick out farther and will hit the snow well before the AFD does.
That's what I was hoping to hear! Thanks!

As to feel because of the different height, at 80mm under foot it will probably be negligible. If you are going the summer between skiing you probably won't even notice. If anything it might be a tiny bit easier to tip. Tiny. The one thing you may notice is if the delta (the difference in height between toe piece and heel piece) is significantly different. @Philpug will have a better idea than me but I'm guessing the two will be close.
Thanks! Yes, I didnt pay as much attention to the heel but did think of this but being both are mounted to the slide rail system i figured it should be somewhat similar in lowering.


Im not one that likes to make big changes unless something is very wrong and as some of you may have read on my other thread other then a very few rare occurrences the original Tyrolia SLR bindings worked excellent for me so hopefully the attacks will only fill that last little void! Thanks
 

François Pugh

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Should that matter?
What does upward release at the toe buys you?
Not sure what toe releasing straight up buys you, but I can recall one instance where bindings NOT releasing upwards at the toe bought me the ability to carve on my tails for one slight turn prior to recovering and getting back in the driver's seat, thus avoiding disaster. I had got knocked back into the rumble seat, due to snow-encrusted goggles and user error (skiing too fast for conditions).
 

Henry

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Many of the Head/Tyrolia toe bindings have their "full diagonal release." (And the same bindings with Elan & Fischer labels.) I've popped out of mine several times, always when I should have, and never noticed just how it released. Each wing of the binding swings to the side independently, or both can swing out to allow an upward release, or any angle as shown. Evidently this backward twisting fall release isn't as positive as the lateral heel release in the upcoming Protector heel bindings which (I think) will include this toe in the set.
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