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Buyer's Guide from Italy

Nobody

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The italian magainse Skialper Buyer's Guide 2024 is out:
There will also be an electronic version...


Meanwhile, to satisfy our lust for snow, here's the promo clip of thwe 2024 Guide:


I like the promo clip of the 2023 release too!


BTW, both are being filmed at my home mountain...just sayin'...
 

Slim

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@Nobody ,
That’s Awesome! Skialpers buyers guide is renowned,
so now that there is an electronic version coming finally! It always seemed so stupid that it was only on paper.
paying the shipping just isn’t worth it, and wasteful too.
And even better if they offer a translated one.
 

Slim

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Well, there certainly is a lot of info in there!

Doe anyone know what some of the categories/terms in the diagrams mean?
perhaps someone who has read the Italian version, and can compare the terms. (anyone? @Nobody :ogbiggrin: ?)
For skis:
trip purpose: summit, line or slope?
maybe line means doing a tour /traverse?
And for recommended use, various categories come past, but I have not found a list of all of them.
I have seen: free touring, steep, ‘big climbs‘ and ‘open mountains‘. There might even be more. i especially wonder about those last two. Does big climbs mean long ascents, or high peaks, climbing on foot? Does open mountains mean wide, open slopes or something else?

For boots I have seen recommended use:
easygoing, classic touring, big climbs and others

They have an automated recommendation algorithm that needs some work…
(check out the length recommendation:ogbiggrin:)
IMG_5426.jpeg
 
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Thread Starter
TS
Nobody

Nobody

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Mmmh, on the online version I see "Ideal for" and "Summit", "Line" and "Downhill" as options...can't find any correspondence in the (Italian language) paper one...Going to ask in some Italian forum about it...
As for the length reccomendations, I suspect that it is either the skis "preferred" length in the skimo circles ("culturally" speaking) for skis indicated as "preview" as the Rise Beyond 96 are (btw in the "Tour" category) or the length at which the skis have been tested (like the Kendo 88, which are indicated in 177cm)

BTW
I liked the italian version of the "intro"


And the English one is on a par...

Out of curiosity, @Slim did you subscribe? Because I read that by subscribing..

What’s included:
  • Our reviews and ratings on over 540 products
  • Lab test results for all products
  • Search filters based on ratings, style and snow performance
  • Make your opinion count by giving us your product feedback
Some of these can be seen in the paper release, some don't
 
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Slim

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I bought the online Version, I don’t think that gives me a subscription to the regular issues?
Yeah, the filter tool for reviews is great.
 

Slim

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For the length thing for the recommendation I had to laugh, because it suggests skis between 201 and 206 cm….
 

Bruno Schull

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Hey Folks.

I have bought and read the Italian print versions for the past four or five years. In the past, I wrote a numer of short reviews of Skialper for the old Wildsnow site. I recently purchased the 2024 Italian print copy, and it should arrive soon. When it does I may be able to help with some of the categories, terms, and so on.

Two points to bear in mind:

First, the team at Skialper has real integrity. For example, the peope testing the skis truly live and work in the mountains, as professional moutain guides, ski instructors, and so forth. They are deeply experienced and dedicated. Another example is the binding tests. Every year, they mount dozens of bindings on identical blocks of wood, test them multiple times with boots that have a variety of fittings, and so on. A third example is the way that they evaluate equipment, often with tools and measurment devices of their own construction, everything from base finishes to boot volumes. To my knowledge, there is no one in the ski world, either alpine or touring, who even tries to achive this level of detail. This doesn't mean that I agree with everything they do, that they can't improve, or that they don't make mistakes, but I think a proper starting point is admiration for what they try to achieve.

Second, their perspective comes from ski touring in the European alps, everything from the Pierra Menta skimo race to climbing 4,000 meter peaks with ski on your back. If you are skiing blower powder in Colorado, exploring glades on the East Coast, or riding mostly on piste and occasionally ducking into the sidecountry, you might not connect with what they say. However, if you take their perspective into account, I think you can learn a great deal.

Last, if you have suggestions, ideas, or questions for the Skialper folks, you might consider stating them clearly here. I think they might follow this thread to get a sense of the response.

OK, carry on.
 

Tony S

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^^^
The famous Last Whole Earth Catalog was subtitled "Access to Tools." SkiTalk forums at their best serve this same function. Bruno's post illustrates this.
 
Thread Starter
TS
Nobody

Nobody

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For the length thing for the recommendation I had to laugh, because it suggests skis between 201 and 206 cm….
Wow! Then that must be a mistake/error in the algorithm. Unless you are really tall and heavy…eh!
I tried the recommendation briefly, without purchasing the extras, and got “normal/to be expected” lengths in the results…
 
Thread Starter
TS
Nobody

Nobody

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I bought the online Version, I don’t think that gives me a subscription to the regular issues?
Yeah, the filter tool for reviews is great.
My understanding is that by purchasing the online version you get a kind of seasonal subscription to the Buyer’s guide itself, whose contents will be enriched with time. Yes you are correct, you won’t get the regular issues.
 

Slim

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Wow! Then that must be a mistake/error in the algorithm. Unless you are really tall and heavy…eh!
I tried the recommendation briefly, without purchasing the extras, and got “normal/to be expected” lengths in the results…
Haha, yeah. I am 196 cm and 80kg, so fairly tall and not lightweight, but not heavy nor super tall.
 

Claudio Primavesi

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Hey Folks.

I have bought and read the Italian print versions for the past four or five years. In the past, I wrote a numer of short reviews of Skialper for the old Wildsnow site. I recently purchased the 2024 Italian print copy, and it should arrive soon. When it does I may be able to help with some of the categories, terms, and so on.

Two points to bear in mind:

First, the team at Skialper has real integrity. For example, the peope testing the skis truly live and work in the mountains, as professional moutain guides, ski instructors, and so forth. They are deeply experienced and dedicated. Another example is the binding tests. Every year, they mount dozens of bindings on identical blocks of wood, test them multiple times with boots that have a variety of fittings, and so on. A third example is the way that they evaluate equipment, often with tools and measurment devices of their own construction, everything from base finishes to boot volumes. To my knowledge, there is no one in the ski world, either alpine or touring, who even tries to achive this level of detail. This doesn't mean that I agree with everything they do, that they can't improve, or that they don't make mistakes, but I think a proper starting point is admiration for what they try to achieve.

Second, their perspective comes from ski touring in the European alps, everything from the Pierra Menta skimo race to climbing 4,000 meter peaks with ski on your back. If you are skiing blower powder in Colorado, exploring glades on the East Coast, or riding mostly on piste and occasionally ducking into the sidecountry, you might not connect with what they say. However, if you take their perspective into account, I think you can learn a great deal.

Last, if you have suggestions, ideas, or questions for the Skialper folks, you might consider stating them clearly here. I think they might follow this thread to get a sense of the response.

OK, carry on.
Hello Bruno, I'm editor in chief at Skialper, the parent magazine of thebuyersguide.it I paste the FAQ about summit, downhill and line. We are open to your suggestions, may be downhill is best to be translated as 'face' (this the natural translation from italian)?
Summit - Designed for long ascents and optimizing the effort needed as you descend from the summit.

Downhill - For those outings that are about more than the destination. They’re also about performance down some stunning faces.

Line - It’s all about the descent. Sure, you have to climb, but as little as possible and with some sacrifice, so you don’t have to sacrifice on the descent.
 

Bruno Schull

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Hi Claudio,

Thanks for all the great work! I look in the mail box for the Italian copy I purchased every day :)

First, it seems that one of the readers may have found a problem with the algorithm. I don't know what numbers they entered, but the algorithm sugested skis over 200 cm in length...

About the names, before I give any suggestions, can you tell me all the categories that you have? Are there 3 categories? Or 5?

My first idea is that "Downhill" is too general in English. Many people call skiing at the resort "downhill skiing." You could try "Descent" or "Freeride" but that might not be different enough from "Line."

You can ask questions and get answers here, or you can send me a private mail.

Whatever you like!

Bruno
 

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