Continuing to ski hard while aging gracefully??

bbinder

Making fresh tracks
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Nov 12, 2015
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1,588
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Massachusetts
1) Moderation in all things
2) Use proper body mechanics in all of your exercises
3) Just keep moving
4) Proper cool down and care of injuries (google Kelly Starrett)
 

no edge

Getting on the lift
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Joined
May 17, 2017
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471
I am going to a pain management doctor shortly. Maybe that will help.
 

oldandslow

Booting up
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Nov 12, 2017
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6
I'm 86. When I started skiing, every turn was an event. Over time, with the improvements in equipment and groomed runs the sport has gotten a lot easier so I just keep my age in mind--I quit racing at age 60--and enjoy it. Its still fun skiing on Marshmallow run and a good excuse for white wine therapy at the end of the day.
 

slowrider

Making fresh tracks
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Dec 17, 2015
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2,507
I'm 86. When I started skiing, every turn was an event. Over time, with the improvements in equipment and groomed runs the sport has gotten a lot easier so I just keep my age in mind--I quit racing at age 60--and enjoy it. Its still fun skiing on Marshmallow run and a good excuse for white wine therapy at the end of the day.
Do you ski Wanoga and I-5?
 

oldandslow

Booting up
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Nov 12, 2017
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I ski the lower part of Wanoga from the top of the Cloudchaser Chair. It has been several years since I skied the top part off the summit. I have not skied I5 since they shortened the Rainbow Chair. It is unlikely that I will ever again ski the top part of Wanoga or I5. I got a new hip this fall and a serious medical problem came along with it. If I'm able to ski this season, it may not be until Timberline is my only option. I have 73 ski seasons behind me and I'm determined to go for 74 if at all possible.
 

Roundturns

Putting on skis
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Nov 29, 2017
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I'm 86. When I started skiing, every turn was an event. Over time, with the improvements in equipment and groomed runs the sport has gotten a lot easier so I just keep my age in mind--I quit racing at age 60--and enjoy it. Its still fun skiing on Marshmallow run and a good excuse for white wine therapy at the end of the day.
Tremendous! Good on you. Still being able to be out there trumps everything else.
 

mikelrv

Getting on the lift
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Jan 9, 2017
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New Jersey
Bodies in motion tend to stay in motion. Do Crossfit, or something like it; train, stretch, but the key is to just keep moving. I ski with many people in the 60's, 70's and . 70. and 80's.
Howdy all,

Looking for tips and advise. I'm 43 and I try to ski 100 days a year. I average to 'ski' 3.5 hours a day, if it's crowded and most weekends maybe 2 hours but if its puking around 5. I prefer to ski off piste fast and hard and usually do 80% of the time. I love the powder, who doesn't, but I have almost as much fun blasting the crud and bumps that follows. I usually only ski groomers to move me from one place on the hill to another, or if everything has gotten iced over in some kind of thaw/freeze combo.

I'm finding that at 40 my body started complaining to me abit more and every year its kinda louder. Ive broken 10-12 bones(skiing/cycling/skateboarding as a youth) and all those are coming back now and then as aches. But my biggest issue is my IT band tightness and the strain they put on my lower back, hips and down my leg to my knees. I stretch several times a day(everyday) and use a foam roller once or twice a day. Im usually able to stay ahead of the pains if I keep a strict routine of stretching and foam rolling. If Im traveling or somehow forget, I'm always paying the price for a couple days with tightness and soreness through my hips and back. Im also finding my body doesn't bounce back as quickly from a hard day. Sore and tired muscles seem more frequent....

During the off season( of skiing) I hike or ride pretty much everyday, but never do any 'strength training' or skiing specific prep work. My summers are filled with alot of farm/forest work, which is very physical itself. I maintain my IT band stretching and foam roller work. During the winter skiing is my only frequent exercise(nearly everyday). I snowshoe or hike maybe once or twice a ski month. I walk the dog everyday about a hilly-mile but then Im off to riding the lifts. During the winter I put on a couple extra pounds, but those usually come off in the spring on the bikes, but even then I still have a few lbs to spare but I love IPA's too much to really care. Im relatively healthy besides the IT bands and previous bone breaks. No medication except allergy pill and a dose of daily vitamins. I do take glucosamine(not sure it does anything). I tried yoga a couple times, and liked the activity but had a hard time with the yoga studio environment.

So long intro to my question, as you've gotten older what have you done to allow yourself to continue to ski as you want? Any tips for helping muscles recover quicker/better after a hard day?

Thanks
-Chris
Bodies in motion tend to stay in motion. Do CrossFit, or something like it ( strength train!); train, stretch, eat well, etc.. but the key is to just keep moving and challenging yourself. I ski with many people in the 60's, 70's and 80's.
 
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