Continuing to ski hard while aging gracefully??

martyg

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I had to learn this over the summer/fall while rehabbing from my knee replacement. I was recovering very quickly early on, so I kept pushing the rehab. (A lot of that is because the exercises seem so ... tiny, as if how could this possibly be helping??) But it was just resulting in inflammation and basically stalling recovery. After adding two full days a week of rest, things started progressing again.
Recovery drinks go a long way to addressing that. I have an interview out there with Susie Parker Simmons, USOPC's head nutritionist. She created their own proprietary recovery drink for athletes, after mot finding what she spec ed in commercially available products, and after said brands did not want to work with her.

Susie also emphasized that a high quality, independently certify (NSF is the leader in that field) recovery drink should ge taken immediateLy after PT sessions.

I am living that right now, and have my massage therapist coming to the house once a week for a 90 minute session. But yes, recognizing when you need recovery time is super important. You don't get stronger without a balance of traing, minitoring load, duration, and recovery.
 
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chris_the_wrench

chris_the_wrench

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Well I'm working on a routine now. I'm considering this my ski season routine, which I will alter for the off season to include some more skiing specific leg strength work. I think my legs get enough strength work skiing nearly everyday, that sound accurate?

-Wake up. Usually muscles are abit tight, but seem to be slightly improving after a few days...maybe...
-Mellow 7-10 minutes of general stretching. Nothing specific, just targeting my normal tight regions(hips, IT, hamstrings, lower back).
-Walk about one hilly mile.
-Head to the hill and ski
-Last run of the day I usually take it abit easier and then between a 2-10 minute ski boot walk back to the car.
-20 minute drive home.
-Immediately after getting home(about 30-40 minutes after clicking out of skis). Im working through a few basic yoga poses/transitions(not pretty, but I'm trying). Doing some core exercises(various planks, pikes, reverse lifts, sittups). This warms me up pretty good. Then I follow up with some long slow more in-depth stretching. This part of the routine takes about 30-35 minutes.
-Just before bed, I use the foam roller(s) on the IT band, quads, hamstrings. 10'ish minutes.

Of course life happens in the middle of all of this, but I'm really trying to establish a routine. I'm trying to start simple without needing much equipment(yoga mat, 2 densities of foam rollers). I'd like to add some bosu ball and suspension training at some point, but don't want to overwhelm my brain.

I've been listening to all the comments and suggestions, now I'm trying to capture them into my real world everyday life.
Thoughts, ideas??

Thanks again for all the responses and suggestions.
-Chris
 

martyg

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I've been listening to all the comments and suggestions, now I'm trying to capture them into my real world everyday life.
Thoughts, ideas??
Two on the most profound influencers in my life from a training standpoint where: 1. Mike Grant. IFBB Pro. I think his best finish was 5th in the Mr. Universe. I went to him for strength training and he opened a whole new world for me from a training and nutrition standpoint. His motto "You have to do the right thing every day." 2. A national team coach that I trainer under in Olympic Sprint kayaking. His motto "You have to check all the boxes, every day."

I've found that constancy, and being process driven, is the key - regardless or domain - from athletics to launching start-ups. If I short change anything if I don't do my warm-up and mobility drills, if I don't do my first / last lap mental check-in, if I don't get a recovery drink in me, something suffers. Usually me. :)
 

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Noodler

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Well I'm working on a routine now. I'm considering this my ski season routine, which I will alter for the off season to include some more skiing specific leg strength work. I think my legs get enough strength work skiing nearly everyday, that sound accurate?

-Wake up. Usually muscles are abit tight, but seem to be slightly improving after a few days...maybe...
-Mellow 7-10 minutes of general stretching. Nothing specific, just targeting my normal tight regions(hips, IT, hamstrings, lower back).
-Walk about one hilly mile.
-Head to the hill and ski
-Last run of the day I usually take it abit easier and then between a 2-10 minute ski boot walk back to the car.
-20 minute drive home.
-Immediately after getting home(about 30-40 minutes after clicking out of skis). Im working through a few basic yoga poses/transitions(not pretty, but I'm trying). Doing some core exercises(various planks, pikes, reverse lifts, sittups). This warms me up pretty good. Then I follow up with some long slow more in-depth stretching. This part of the routine takes about 30-35 minutes.
-Just before bed, I use the foam roller(s) on the IT band, quads, hamstrings. 10'ish minutes.

Of course life happens in the middle of all of this, but I'm really trying to establish a routine. I'm trying to start simple without needing much equipment(yoga mat, 2 densities of foam rollers). I'd like to add some bosu ball and suspension training at some point, but don't want to overwhelm my brain.

I've been listening to all the comments and suggestions, now I'm trying to capture them into my real world everyday life.
Thoughts, ideas??

Thanks again for all the responses and suggestions.
-Chris
At some point find a way to make time for serious strength training. Body by Science only takes 15-30 minutes max.
 

mdf

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leg blaster routine
I've never been able to do enough lunges (the major component of leg blasters) to matter. They aggravate the plantar fascia on the bottom of my feet. That's why I prefer the stairmaster. (That and because I can read while using it.)
 

PinnacleJim

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The major issue to skiing at a relatively high level as you get older is health. And health is a function heredity, lifestyle, and luck. Good knees are a big factor for venturing off the groomers into bumps and powder. I have been very lucky with my health, and at 74, ski 60 to 70 days a year with most days 9 to 3 with an hour lunch. Still able to enjoy things like multiple laps on Pali at A-Basin or the bumps on Outer Limits at Killington. Just at more relaxed pace.
 

geepers

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Good knees are a big factor for venturing off the groomers into bumps and powder.
Good technic can make a big difference. 5 years ago when I decided to get serious about skiing and did 1st 100+ day season I wasn't really into technic. used to attempt to angulate at the knees (literally laterally). Consequentially had sore knees most of that season and thought it was just the price to be paid. Cold packs every evening.

The next season was very fortunate to do a bumps clinic early in the 2 month trip. The instructor watched one run of bump skiing and straight out asked if I got sore knees. Began changing the technic from that point and extremely happy that sore knees are a thing of the past.

Sure there are injuries that create problems or aren't helped by skiing. But we should be wary if skiing exacerbates an otherwise pain free existence. Spend some dollars on a top quality instructor.
 

Ron

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@martyg mentioned it above, but I am a big fan of balanced diet and proper level of protein and complex carb intake. Not advising anyone on what to do but when cycling or skiing hard, I intake about .75 grams of protein per pound (over the course of a day) and always eat about 20 grams of protein and about .5 grams of carbs per pound within 30 minutes of an intense cycling or skiing. Also, I drink about 80-100 ounces of water with electrolytes per day.
 

markojp

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Which may take awhile given your old age. Unless there’s a Taos way for that too...
Give him time to change his Depends. :)
 

Crank

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OK so there are different levels of high level skiing for each of us. We are all at different places on the aging and fitness scale as well. It would be great if someone could somehow organize all the information in this thread.

For me at 63: I find it much better to stay in shape rather than my old, youthful ways of gearing up for the season. For exercise I have one of those old Nordic Tracks and use hand weights. Plus a mix of core stuff from Pilates and yoga and just stretching. I also have some it band issues and the specific stretches I do for that has been helping. We also get out and hike and ride both road and mtb.

I am type 2 diabetic but have managed to keep a low A1C with regular exercise being, I think, a big factor in controlling that. Eating right is also very important for me. I eat lots of veggies and lean protein and almost no carbs these days. Ya gotta do what ya gotta do.

I feel like I still ski at a fairly high level. Meaning that I still ski the same kinds of terrain and do it mostly with confidence. However, I ski slower. I ski more cautiously. I ski softer. I ski bankers hours unless, well, powder. I tell myself that as I age I will still love getting out on in the hills on snow even if just tooling around of easy groomers.

Couple of years ago I was skiing Alta's High Rustler by myself and was doing just fine. Stopped to rest my aging legs and looked up slope to see a guy, probably around 40, skiing it with all out abandon. Just crushing it he was - biting off big chunks of vertical, toying with gravity. That sight made me long for my youth. Every once in a while I forget my age and make a few big moves. Afterwards I tell myself, "You're gonna get hurt if you keep doing that. Getting hurt as we get older sucks all the more because it takes so damn long to heal.
 

martyg

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@martyg mentioned it above, but I am a big fan of balanced diet and proper level of protein and complex carb intake. Not advising anyone on what to do but when cycling or skiing hard, I intake about .75 grams of protein per pound (over the course of a day) and always eat about 20 grams of protein and about .5 grams of carbs per pound within 30 minutes of an intense cycling or skiing. Also, I drink about 80-100 ounces of water with electrolytes per day.
Electrolytes seem to be a hidden gem for me. Even now, have a leg in a brace, doing a light weight workout and several PT sessions per day, if I don't do a liter of diluted electrolyte mix per day I feel wiped.
 
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SBrown

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.... Every once in a while I forget my age and make a few big moves. Afterwards I tell myself, "You're gonna get hurt if you keep doing that. Getting hurt as we get older sucks all the more because it takes so damn long to heal.
Writing checks the body can't cash. Very familiar with it. :roflmao: Mostly on the tennis court: I could still get to that ball, but I probably shouldn't have....
 

Ron

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Mostly on the tennis court: I could still get to that ball, but I probably shouldn't have..
as my neighbor says, use your "intelligent edge".. thats the point where you know you shouldn't pass. :).
 

Noodler

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Electrolytes seem to be a hidden gem for me. Even now, have a leg in a brace, doing a light weight workout and several PT sessions per day, if I don't do a liter of diluted electrolyte mix per day I feel wiped.
I "cheat" on this one, but I needed a no-carb way to get them...
 

oldschoolskier

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If you are having back issues, your core is weak. Most people (top level athletes included) do not balance the strength stomach and back, most times the stomach is weaker which results in back pain. This causes most people to exercise the back more and strength it which causes an even worse imbalance. This is why top level training programs focus on this aspect.
 

Tony S

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Mostly on the tennis court: I could still get to that ball, but I probably shouldn't have....
This is exactly why I can't really play tennis anymore. I'm like the cat with the red laser dot. Some dumb animal thing takes over all the circuitry. Exercise is one thing, exorcise is another.
 

cantunamunch

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This is exactly why I can't really play tennis anymore. I'm like the cat with the red laser dot. Some dumb animal thing takes over all the circuitry. Exercise is one thing, exorcise is another.
On a complete tangent, I'm convinced that we're actually blinding our cats with the laser dots, or at least completely overwhelming their retinas. Imagine if someone shone a laser dot while you were wearing night vision glasses.

#dumbanimalisus
 

Big J

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I am 63 and will be having two total knee replacements done soon as I am bone on bone in both knees. The first is three weeks from now. I was Pro-Patrol in Germany and weekends at Keystone in the early 1980s. My knee issues stem from when I was on the 101st Airborne skydiving demonstration team in 1979. We did freefall formation jumps with an average of 10-12 guys in the formation. These were done at festivals and bringing the game balls into football stadiums at night etc. as a form of recruitment. Lots of concrete and asphalt small drop zones. Caused impact damage that really did not show much until I was about 60. I always buy a seasons pass and ski 10-15 days a year at Whistler and other areas. I am pretty much a cruiser now. Had 3 meniscus surgeries that had very little longevity for me. With Covid it looks like this is a good year to get my knees done. I will do 100% of the required rehab.
 
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