Cordless iron

Philpug

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He's team red. I'm team yellow. We should have planned it better since we live around the corner from each other!
Yeah, that was bad planning on my part. When I moved from Craftsman, the other red one, I should have gone yellow, plus it matches the rest of my Toko stuff.
 

Ogg

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I did have Dewalt send me a new one when one went bad on me. It showed full but died quick. They do make the money on batteries.
I have a couple like that but they're well out of warranty. I also dropped one of my newest ones into a full bucket of spackle yesterday, terminal side down, of course. :doh:
 

KingGrump

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This is only part of my yellow collection. Yes, it's a bunch of $$ in batteries but usually a tool will go on sale with a battery at or just above the cost of a battery alone. For around the house I've found these tools to be more than adequate. The only one I've had crap out on me was a small blower and I used that A LOT. I also have a 12" chain saw, hedge trimmers, and pole saw all of which have their place and get used around my house, neighbors' houses, and at my FiL's place in Washington. They get you with that first drill: it's the gateway tool! And BTW, the ½" impact is great for changing tires and has a place of honor in our 5th wheel!

View attachment 174739

Dude, is that a corded multi-tool behind the tape measure? Ya outta here. :ogbiggrin:
Honestly, you use your tool. A lot of use for a home owner. Your tools are not there just for the bragging rights. They are real working tools.
Some of these guys on the FB displayed their tool collection with the packaging still intact. :nono:

I've burnt up a few drills, impacts and sawzalls but only from heavy use. What I have a problem with is batteries, getting flaky or crapping out. From what I've seen and heard Milwaukee is a bit better about that.

Tools have always worn out from usage. That is a given. Replacement is just cost of doing business. It's good for the tools to get worn out. It just mean your got work.
The batteries, that's is another can of worm. I find the batteries the weak link in the pro tool line up. The batteries will often die long before the tools. I have couple boxes of dead batteries I have to recycle. Most folks out there don't realize the batteries have a limited life. Not only in terms of charge cycles but shelf life. Most batteries will die after 5 to 10 years even if you are not using them.

Milwaukee's track record with batteries had been spotty. The ancient 18v NiMH were bullet proof. The interim V18/V28 series were just bad. No other word for it. The current M18 series are very reliable except for the high Ah units. I have friends in the trade with tons of bad 9 Ah batteries. They just send them a new 8Ah unit as a replacement. Milwaukee is looking a lot like the software industry. Let the consumer do the beta testing for them on new products.
Their M12 line is pretty sweet also.

Dewalt had been very solid with their batteries. The new higher capacity 20v(18v) units are experiencing some issues.

Makita has been slow on the big battery game. They opt for putting multiple batteries on a tool to get more bang out of the existing batteries. For me that works. 2x 18v 5 Ah batteries is the same as a single 18v 10Ah battery. The Makita 2x18v "worm drive" saw is the one that finally got me to retire my corded Skil 77.

All the manufacturer are now stepping up to higher voltage batteries. Those batteries are huge, heavy and expensive. I'll give them a few year to find their bearings. Hate being on the bleeding edge.
 
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ScotsSkier

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I have Been using dewalt for several years for my personal gate drill and we also use dewalt at palisades. Only issue I have found is that with the large gate drill bit the front main bearing wears pretty quickly. as cheap to replace the tool as replacing the bearing….
 

KingGrump

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The best of tool for the job is the one you got, it is said.

I don't have a problem with these facebook folks with their walls of top of the line tools that are used once or a few times a year. Whatever makes them happy.

If they have to force themselves to use the tools just to fully utilise the tools to their max capacity, then they are just slaves to the tools.

An enthusiast will never max out a top of the line tool. People in the trades who use tools for a living can extract 1 year, 3, years, 5 years out of a tool if used everyday. An enthusiast can probably extract 25-50 years out of a tool if used once or a few times a year.

Which begs the question, should an enthusiast just but a cheap $30 China-made tool or a more expensive Milwaukee, Dewalt and Makita equivalent?

And that further begs the question: should an average skier, who skis 1-2 weeks a year, buy top of the line skis, clothing, tuning equipment, boots, and other gear?

Or should they just rent? Or buy cheap ones (the $30 drill equivalent of ski gear)?

I don't have a problem with whatever strategy they take.

Some people would argue buy the cheap gear and use the money saved up to get more ski days.

But that doesn't take into account that some people may not have time to spend 100 days on the slopes. Maybe because of family commitments or maybe because their job only grants them the privilege of taking 1 month off a year, 2 weeks of which they use for skiing (just as an example of course). There are many variations of days that people can spend on the slopes per year depending on their circumstance.

I say whatever makes them happy. We don't have a right to say they are "wasting" their gear, because we don't know their circumstance. Maybe they are old and have physical conditions that prevent them from spending more than a few days on the slope per year. Maybe they have other hobbies apart from skiing. Maybe a few days on the ski hill making and uploading insta and tiktok videos is what brings them happiness and improves their mental health.

There are so many variations and possibilities that I don't think there is no ever one right answer or "truth". There never is.

For myself, I use the best gear I can get because that eliminates the variable of what causes me to not improve. If I have the best gear, or at least the ones that I think are best, and I'm not improving, then I cannot blame the gear. I can only blame myself for not improving.

Each to his own.

Lots of questions. Will parse it out for clarity.

If they have to force themselves to use the tools just to fully utilise the tools to their max capacity, then they are just slaves to the tools.

My point is at least take them out of the packaging and put some dirt/dust on them so they look used. Nobody wants to look like a wannabe. The shine on all those new tools is killing my eyes. Have to dim my monitor. That is just so unnecessary.

An enthusiast will never max out a top of the line tool. People in the trades who use tools for a living can extract 1 year, 3, years, 5 years out of a tool if used everyday. An enthusiast can probably extract 25-50 years out of a tool if used once or a few times a year.

Most don't realize batteries only last 5 to 10 years even if you don't use them. Not to mention battery platform change.

Which begs the question, should an enthusiast just but a cheap $30 China-made tool or a more expensive Milwaukee, Dewalt and Makita equivalent?

Things are seldom as simple as they appeared.

1659799595335.png


And that further begs the question: should an average skier, who skis 1-2 weeks a year, buy top of the line skis, clothing, tuning equipment, boots, and other gear?

If you are skiing couple days a year. Every other year. Rent.
If you ski one to two week a year. Every year. Having your own gear will be worth it just for the time saving on the rental line.
Plus you will be already be familiar with the gear. Never know what you'll get from rental. Predictability is a big thing with skiing. Change too many variable at the same time is a recipe for disaster.

The whole skiing better thing is so one can have more fun on the slope without getting hurt. Falling multiple times per days is a sure fire recipe to major long term injuries. Like I said in the "falling" thread. Russian roulette with a semi-auto.

Expand your performance envelope so you can do more with less.



 
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Rich_Ease_3051

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Lots of questions. Will parse it out for clarity.

If they have to force themselves to use the tools just to fully utilise the tools to their max capacity, then they are just slaves to the tools.

My point is at least take them out of the packaging and put some dirt/dust on them so they look used. Nobody wants to look like a wannabe. The shine on all those new tools is killing my eyes. Have to dim my monitor. That is just so unnecessary.

An enthusiast will never max out a top of the line tool. People in the trades who use tools for a living can extract 1 year, 3, years, 5 years out of a tool if used everyday. An enthusiast can probably extract 25-50 years out of a tool if used once or a few times a year.

Most don't realize batteries only last 5 to 10 years even if you don't use them. Not to mention battery platform change.

Which begs the question, should an enthusiast just but a cheap $30 China-made tool or a more expensive Milwaukee, Dewalt and Makita equivalent?

Things are seldom as simple as they appeared.

View attachment 174741


And that further begs the question: should an average skier, who skis 1-2 weeks a year, buy top of the line skis, clothing, tuning equipment, boots, and other gear?

If you are skiing couple days a year. Every other year. Rent.
If you ski one to two week a year. Every year. Having your own gear will be worth it just for the time saving on the rental line.
Plus you will be already be familiar with the gear. Never know what you'll get from rental. Predictability is a big thing with skiing. Change too many variable at the same time is a recipe for disaster.

The whole skiing better thing is so one can have more fun on the slope without getting hurt. Falling multiple times per days is a sure fire recipe to major long term injuries. Like I said in the "falling" thread. Russian roulette with a semi-auto.

Expand your performance envelope so you can do more with less.




Maybe those facebook folks just busted out those tools from their packaging and took a picture. Maybe they just use them a few times a year and clean them. Maybe they're anal about their workbench. I think a clean workbench is an admirable thing. Shows organisation and discipline to clean up after a job and keep everything spotless. I wish I had this trait.

It's possible that some have never used them. If they don't use them, at least they have the tools on ready if they ever start a project. The best tool is the one you got, and those nice pictures show a lot of preparation in anticipation of starting a project.

Messing them up just to appear used seems like trying to get the approval of other people, particularly the real tool guys. I think that's sad, if they messed and soiled them up just to get other people's approval.
 

Swiss Toni

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And that further begs the question: should an average skier, who skis 1-2 weeks a year, buy top of the line skis, clothing, tuning equipment, boots, and other gear?

In Europe its generally thought that its not worth buying skis unless you ski more than 12 days a year. Some people do buy new gear every year, when the Russians could travel to Europe many of them just left all their gear behind in the hotel when they went home. Unless they are involved in racing very few Europeans living outside the skiing regions tune their own skis, some get them serviced at a shop at the beginning of the season, but many don’t bother. Very often the only gear they own are boots, clothing and a helmet.

There are already cordless heat guns

You can get an attachment for a heat gun that’s designed for waxing skis
Jomax.jpg

http://shop.stama.at/metallauflage-f-heissluftfoen.html
 
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Rich_Ease_3051

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In Europe its generally thought that its not worth buying skis unless you ski more than 12 days a year. Some people do buy new gear every year, when the Russians could travel to Europe many of them just left all their gear behind in the hotel when they went home. Unless they are involved in racing very few Europeans living outside the skiing regions tune their own skis, some get them serviced at a shop at the beginning of the season, but many don’t bother. Very often the only gear they own are boots, clothing and a helmet.

I understand that in Europe, they rent out even the top of the line skis? Is that true? Like let's say, you want to rent this year's or last year's Stockli SL, AR, or AX, they would be on offer at the rental shop?
 
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anders_nor

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I understand that in Europe, they rent out even the top of the line skis? Is that true? Like let's say, you want to rent this year's or last year's Stockli SL, AR, or AX, they would be on offer at the rental shop?
yes

even more exotic stuff like GS, WRT-ST etc. deacon 84 v-werks etc etc
 
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Rich_Ease_3051

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yes

even more exotic stuff like GS, WRT-ST etc. deacon 84 v-werks etc etc
That's amazing. Here in Australia, the only rentals I see are white colour Volkl Deacons for beginners and intermediates. The expert rentals are Rosignol I think but don't know what model. I'm pretty sure it's just those two and that's in Perisher, which, for all intents and purposes, is the best resort in Australia. Owned by Vail.

I can now understand why Europeans would not bother buying if the best can be rented. That's a bit shocking to know honestly lol.
 
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jt10000

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Remembering I'm still using an electric drill I bought around 1985. About 10 years ago a radial saw I got from my father than he bought in the 1970s finally gave up. We are not heavy users by any means, but still, those things saw some action. Both corded of course. Both Skil brand - not sure if that's any good anymore.
 

Swiss Toni

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I understand that in Europe, they rent out even the top of the line skis? Is that true? Like let's say, you want to rent this year's or last year's Stockli SL, AR, or AX, they would be on offer at the rental shop?
It’s estimated that around 65% of all skis sold in the alpine countries end up in hire pools. The ski shops in the resorts make most of their money from rental, you can rent almost anything either for a day, a week or a season.

One of the big players in Austria is Bründl Sports, they started with 1 shop in Kaprun in 1956 and now have 31 shops. In 2021 their rebuilt their flagship store in Kaprun https://www.bruendl.at/en/locations/kaprun/flagshipstore and held an opening party.



It was all financed by ski rental. Bründl Sports is also the exclusive retailer for Van Deer skis in Austria, they placed an initial order for 1000 pairs. If you want your skis serviced they have World Cup level ski service technicians https://www.bruendl.at/en/services/product-services/racing-service
 
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Rich_Ease_3051

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Hate to break it to you. Those aren't real Volkl Deacons.
LOL I believe you now that you mentioned it. First time I try to bend them I immediately thought "oh so this is what they mean when they say skis are noodles".

Going from those to Deacon Vwerks which are so stiff, it's literally like the difference between black and white. The white "deacons" are like wearing flipflops. While the Vwerks feels like riding a spaceship. Those are the only two skis I've ever skied in my whole life.
 
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anders_nor

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That's amazing. Here in Australia, the only rentals I see are white colour Volkl Deacons for beginners and intermediates. The expert rentals are Rosignol I think but don't know what model. I'm pretty sure it's just those two and that's in Perisher, which, for all intents and purposes, is the best resort in Australia. Owned by Vail.

I can now understand why Europeans would not bother buying if the best can be rented. That's a bit shocking to know honestly lol.

one shop at the "2,5 hour away mountain" here had atomic G9RS (masters RACE skis) with 16 DIN proper bindings .. as RENTALS, multiple pairs! not even an atomic shop.

people do like to buy around here, but quite often they will demo/rent a ski before buying, so it works out. I'm that weirdo that like to bring skis with me when skiing in europe. But I do most of the time rent pow skis there

"v-werks" is kinda not saying much either btw, without specifying model ;) deacon 84 v-werks are very nice skis.

but I wouldnt define them as that stiff. honestly they ski supernice for not beeing that stiff! ;)
 

Tom K.

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Maybe they're anal about their workbench.

Fair point. I've got an xc/biking buddy with a workbench that always looks like it belongs in a chip manufacturing clean room.

Like two minutes after the last ski is scraped, you can't tell he was in there.

Me, I'm what you'd generously call sloppily organized. Everything has a place, but it isn't always fancy, and the floor isn't always clean, because mountain bikes.

@Andy Mink, kudos on the use of the "pockets" afforded by an interior wall that is only sheet rocked on one side. Mine:

Wall of Skis 2 of 2.JPG
 

Andy Mink

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kudos on the use of the "pockets" afforded by an interior wall that is only sheet rocked on one side
That wasn't storage. That was the wall on which I was working and those were the tools I'd been using to repair it. The outside material started to rot so I pulled it off. Turns out the studs and parts of the plate and sub floor were pretty nasty too.
20200414_131055.jpg
20200415_095414.jpg
 
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