Dad’s Top Ten Winter Driving Tips

DanoT

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Unfortunately advice that makes it almost impossible to ski in Western Canada or along I-70 or I-80 corridors
The main problem with winter driving in western Canada is freshly plowed and sanded roads at times are lacking, combined with inexperienced truck drivers who also lack experience driving on snowy roads.
 

slowrider

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Unfortunately advice that makes it almost impossible to ski in Western Canada or along I-70 or I-80 corridors
Oh my Canada...that's a whole different game. Look out for those guys with funny hats.
 

DanoT

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Oh my Canada...that's a whole different game. Look out for those guys with funny hats.
^^^Yes, we have a lot of immigrant truck drivers in Canada, mostly from South Asia who unlike born in Canada Canadians, have not grown up in a car culture, compounded by a lack of license regulation and lack of driver training.

I'd rather drive behind these highway haulers vs passing them and then worrying if they can stop in time in an emergency.
 

snwbrdr

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The main problem with winter driving in western Canada is freshly plowed and sanded roads at times are lacking, combined with inexperienced truck drivers who also lack experience driving on snowy roads.
And the rest of Canada hasn't caught up to Quebec province yet
 
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crgildart

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This dad says ALWAYS give big rigs a lot of extra room... especially in icy and windy conditions. It's hard enough for them to see you without blowing snow. Best to stay clear and assume they don't see you when you do have to get close or pass. When you're clear they'll flash their lights to tell you there's now room to change lanes in front of them.
 

scott43

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I may have different experiences but must truck drivers of large commercial trucks are on the whole pretty professional and predictable. Yeah when they decide to change lanes they're definitely changing lanes, but they are generally direct and professional about it. Let's talk taxis and douche bag heroes who have to beat the car in front... Every.. Single... Time..
 

slowrider

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Hey, what’s going on these days? Did they change the standards for what can tow what? I’m seeing tons of pickup trucks with no beds acting as a real truck, towing multiple car trailers, small flat beds. The other day I saw one towing a shipping container! Looked like something someone rigged up in the garage.

They’re all sketchy in my mind.
Hot shots are PUs hauling trailers and are federally regulated like class 8 trucks. Some states allow multiple trailers to be towed. WY,MT,ect. Hotshots are required to go into scales to weight and be inspected.
 

slowrider

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Back in the days, that used to be the norm. Nowadays, the truckers have very different on road etiquette.
I know you're right. The knights of the road are long gone. CB radio is obsolete. Cell phones changed that. Truckers don't even wave at each other anymore. Auto transmissions, GPS, truck schools,ect. I miss the the Mom & Pop cafes.
 
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crgildart

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Back in the days, that used to be the norm. Nowadays, the truckers have very different on road etiquette.
Maybe they will program the AI autonomous truckers to be more personable!
 

Dr.T

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If you're ever skiing Steamboat make it a point to set aside at least one day to attend the Bridgestone Winter Driving School. My wife had a blast and gained a great amount of confidence and important skills after just one day.
 

Jack skis

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My best winter driving advice is: Stay the hell outta my way! That's not because I'm a good driver or entitled, quite the contrary. Can't wait to be winter driving again. Watch out!
 

slowrider

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My best winter driving advice is: Stay the hell outta my way! That's not because I'm a good driver or entitled, quite the contrary. Can't wait to be winter driving again. Watch out!
Would you please turn your lights on, thank you.:duck:
 

snwbrdr

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My best winter driving advice is: Stay the hell outta my way! That's not because I'm a good driver or entitled, quite the contrary. Can't wait to be winter driving again. Watch out!
...or you'll rear-end someone? Especially if the car in front has appropriate 3PMSF tires?
 

no edge

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Here's some old days experience that were part of my driving skills (or lack there of).

1. My son and I were coming down Rt 7 from Manchester. We had just come from Sugarbush and an early opening and a big dump. It snowed all day. After we passed Manchester Police were flagging drivers off because of bad condition on 7. I wanted to stay on 7 so I just went around the trooper.

My son is a very orderly person. He would never do something like. I can't be sure but it was more than 15" on the road - no snow plows and no other cars. I realized that the choice to go past the road closure was not so good. I was driving as fast as the car would go... about 40 mph. Snow was coming over the hood of the car making visibility dificult. It was nerver wracking to say the least. The boy was very concerned.

When we came out on the other end I asked him what he was worried about. It reminded me of my attitude towards closed trails - back then.

2. I took driver ed in high school. The instructor had a brake on his side of the car. When ever it was my turn to drive he would be pounding brake every few minuets for some reason or other. Everyone in the car would jerk forward. I got a chuckle out of that.

We when to the school parking lot when there was enough snow. We would practice stopping and starting and four wheel drifts. Long story short, one day one of the girls was driving and drove full speed into the plow piles. The front doors hardly opened. Not good and not funny so I had to refrain from a laugh -high school - 1972.
 
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no edge

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3 Going on, we used to do cross country trips. Coming home from Aspen one time there was a light snow by East Coast standards. But it was slippery and we were going right along. I noticed many semi-truck off the road, many tipped over. We were doing 85 mph so I suggested we slow down. The driver had no clue. The bridges were really iced up. At one point my truck went sideways and he didn't even know it. He looked at me and said "what was that". The next driver was up so he took over.

Aspen was amazing but the other guys had altitude sickness.

There are more tails. Lucky to be alive.
 

Matt Merritt

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Great list but have to add one adage that every race driver knows: When thinks go wonky, always look where you want the car to go. DO NOT focus on that thing you don't want to hit because if you do you'll hit it every time.
 

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