Do I have to carve?

Hankj

Getting on the lift
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He's not on a race board either. Impressive.
If you folks can tolerate snowboard carving, Ryan Knapton is an ex freestyle pro who started carving piste as a main focus. In the first 25 seconds he slarves turns goofing off like a newbie, and then the talent show starts.

Boy oh boy how incredibly fun carving can be, it must feel amazing to be him


 

James

Out There
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Dec 2, 2015
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Wow, that guy is good on a board.

That’s at Breck? They really have some amazing cruisers-if you can be there without many people on it.
 

Andy Mink

Upside down but trying harder
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Not only must you carve, you must be horizontal on the snow surface with your board or skis extended fully away from your body, while passing under a limbo bar. See above.
Some people boot out. These guys armpit out.
 

slowrider

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Today at Bachelor(corn central) some guy with a hard boot alpine board setup was layn down 9m turns. Too much fun...
 

slowrider

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"Oh, but do I have to ? " :roflmao:
How low can you go.
Screenshot_20220515-081241_Samsung Internet.jpg
 

Chris V.

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Steering wheels are things we turn with muscular effort.

I've always understood "steering" when applied to skiing to mean the skier is manually, muscularly, turning the skis, either with the upper body or the feet/legs. Steering = rotating, twisting, pivoting the skis.
The term "steering" seems to be used in more than one way (which is a big reason I'd shy away from using it in a lesson). The definition you've given is surely one that I've often heard. But I maintain that "manually, muscularly, turning the skis"--with a movement that rotates the feet relative to the upper body, separated at the subtalar joints or at some higher point--is impossible. The skis encounter the snow giving resistance to pivoting. The upper body encounters only air, which gives minimal resistance to pivoting. Any rotational body movement creating an upper-lower body separation will result in the upper body rotating relative to the snow, not a rotation of the skis relative to the snow. An engaged ski is not going to be muscled into making a tighter turn than the ski's design and the nature of its engagement with the snow creates.

The exception is at the point of transition, when the skis are light and flat to the snow surface. Here it's possible to create an abrupt pivot. This is how many skiers initiate their turns. It has its place in moguls and perhaps steeps. Otherwise, it's precisely what we're trying to get away from, whether we're talking about carving or about creating high quality brushed turns.

The other exception is the stivot, which requires a momentary flattening of the skis. Again, this is a quick movement that occupies just a small fraction of the turn cycle.

Instead, when people use the term "steering," they generally mean something that's done progressively as the turn develops.

I don't mean to minimize the importance of upper-lower body separation. But the good effects it has don't include "manually, muscularly, turning the skis."
But I'd also like to have a readily usable term for ski turns that grip at both the tail and the tip through the entire turn, and make round turns based on the bend in the ski, while slipping/skidding over the surface of hard snow. These turns are not arc-to-arc carved turns by the definition in the paragraph above, but they do rely heavily on the ski's self-turning capability.
Playing the iconoclast again, I maintain that the quality brushed turns you're discussing do not feature tails following the same path as tips. Instead, the feature greater grip in the tips than in the tails, with the tips following a clean arc, but the tails slipping out slightly relative to the paths taken by the tips. Hence the wider tracks such turns leave.
 
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