How's the edge tuning quality by Razor tune?

KingGrump

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Has anyone else had to do this many passes?

The worst I have encountered was a pair of "premium" ski. 12 passes with a coarse wheel to reset the factory angle to 3°. This is with the side wall cut back so interference from the side wall plastic. Just pure metal edge removal. The odd thing is the extra passes were only required for the front of the skis. All four edges from the binding toe forward. The back end of the skis took 6 passes to reset.

Had the same experience with another pair of skis with the same issue. Same "premium" brand. Front of the skis took 8 passes while the back needed only 6.

However, the more disconcerting issue that surfaced was the inconsistency of the factory side edge angle. three quarter of the way through the edge angle reset, the ski edges looked like a serrated kitchen knife with irregular scallops varying from one to three inches. That happened with five (05) pairs of same premium brand skis in the last two years. :nono:
 

KingGrump

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was that starting from 1? I guess changing by 2 should take roughly twice as much h as me changing Alan's skis by 1.

The factory tune was specified as 1.4/2 for this so called "premium" ski brand. After my recent experience, my conjecture is the actual angle may be 1.4/1, 2, 1.5, 2, 1, 1.25, 2.25... etc. :nono:

Basically, the side edge angle was varied all over the place along the entire ski edge. Especially the front of the ski.

Prepped three pairs of Volkl in the same tuning session. They were dead on 3°. Two passes with a medium stone and they are good to go.
 

anders_nor

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I don't have an x-tra coarse, just a coarse, med & fine!

on some new skis, or poorly way off skis you will need quite a few passes with course as I discoverd, on well maintaned skis, its fast! 1 pass with course if same angle and set properly
 

anders_nor

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The worst I have encountered was a pair of "premium" ski. 12 passes with a coarse wheel to reset the factory angle to 3°. This is with the side wall cut back so interference from the side wall plastic. Just pure metal edge removal. The odd thing is the extra passes were only required for the front of the skis. All four edges from the binding toe forward. The back end of the skis took 6 passes to reset.

Had the same experience with another pair of skis with the same issue. Same "premium" brand. Front of the skis took 8 passes while the back needed only 6.

However, the more disconcerting issue that surfaced was the inconsistency of the factory side edge angle. three quarter of the way through the edge angle reset, the ski edges looked like a serrated kitchen knife with irregular scallops varying from one to three inches. That happened with five (05) pairs of same premium brand skis in the last two years. :nono:
I see the "front of ski" thing quite often, and quite often on premium brands, latest victim were my new SX
 

Atomicman

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I guess if I had skis that far of, I would start with a Panzer file at 1 degree higher than my final edge angle (so if I wanted to end up with a 3 degree, I would use a 4 degree tool. ) This is known as back-filing. I would then finish the side edges with the Razor-Tune Don't think I would use the Razor Tune to dramatically change the edge angle. It is much more effective as a "finish" tool. Although I have changed a 2 degree to a 3 degree with the RT and it didn't take a lot of passes.
 

SKIDADL

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Just to close the loop - I used my new Razor Tune for the last third of the season to good effect. It is everything I had hoped it would be - easy to use - more consistent and less error prone than my Swix Evo with a very good and consistent edge. I especially like how the Razor Tune starts up - with the disc against the work and then turn the machine on - no discernible "start-up" marks on the edge! Like using all these machines the real and necessary work is in doing a good job of cutting back the ABS sidewall to give the machine a clean metal edge to engage. I like the Swix sidewall remover best of the tools I have tried for sidewall removal.
I couldn't get the battery model of the Razor Tune when I wanted to make my purchase but had no issues with cord model - a good work setup combined with a few power-off dry runs made sure that nothing caught during the real work process.
So the Razor Tune is a winner - my Swix Evo was sold to a loving race family in Alberta at a very friendly to them price. Everybody seems happy!
 

sparty

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Just to close the loop - I used my new Razor Tune for the last third of the season to good effect. It is everything I had hoped it would be - easy to use - more consistent and less error prone than my Swix Evo with a very good and consistent edge. I especially like how the Razor Tune starts up - with the disc against the work and then turn the machine on - no discernible "start-up" marks on the edge! Like using all these machines the real and necessary work is in doing a good job of cutting back the ABS sidewall to give the machine a clean metal edge to engage. I like the Swix sidewall remover best of the tools I have tried for sidewall removal.
I couldn't get the battery model of the Razor Tune when I wanted to make my purchase but had no issues with cord model - a good work setup combined with a few power-off dry runs made sure that nothing caught during the real work process.
So the Razor Tune is a winner - my Swix Evo was sold to a loving race family in Alberta at a very friendly to them price. Everybody seems happy!
It's worth noting that Swix has at least two different sidewall tools.

I own the more-basic one (the TA101N), which works decently but can be a bit finicky.

At work, I use the "World Cup" version (TA104), and it's much more pleasant to use and, IMO, the added smoothness from improved tool design results in a smoother sidewall cut (less likely to induce chattering). It also costs more than twice as much, but the next time I order tuning tools, I plan to order one. For home use, I'm pretty sure if I buy one now, it will last for decades.
 

Atomicman

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It's worth noting that Swix has at least two different sidewall tools.

I own the more-basic one (the TA101N), which works decently but can be a bit finicky.

At work, I use the "World Cup" version (TA104), and it's much more pleasant to use and, IMO, the added smoothness from improved tool design results in a smoother sidewall cut (less likely to induce chattering). It also costs more than twice as much, but the next time I order tuning tools, I plan to order one. For home use, I'm pretty sure if I buy one now, it will last for decades.
This by far is the best! Have tried them all! https://www.slidewright.com/kunzmann-fk-sks-pro-sidewall-stripper.php
 

Dave Marshak

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I had the orange FK-SKS tool but I switched to a hand held panzer file because it was it needed to be adjusted too much. Now I’m using a file in a 7 degree guide. That always works and keeps my hands away from the sharp edge.

dm
 

mdf

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I find different sidewall strippers work for different skis. Sometimes the special tool, sometimes the panzer. It's the flukeiest part of tuning.
 
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