Northern Rockies/Alberta IKON Pass arrives in Idaho With the Addition of Schweitzer for Winter 2021-2022

David Chaus

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So I've been thinking about this more... and at which resorts has Ikon really made a big crowding difference? Jackson Hole comes to mind as one I've heard complaints about, but it's limited to 7 days on Ikon, and I'd always heard Jackson was pretty crowded to begin with. Is it an Ikon problem? Crystal also comes to mind... that could be a good example. But others like Copper and WP have always been pretty crowded. Any others I'm not thinking of?

On the other hand (for places I've been), you have Big Sky, which is still relatively uncrowded (and was/is trying to increase visits, Ikon or not), Taos which hasn't been very affected (and also wants to increase visits, Ikon or not), and Aspen, which hasn't seemed to be affected much at all as far as I can tell.

So which group would/will Schweitzer fall into, I wonder?
Crystal is an interesting example because it is very much a local’s mountain rather than a destination resort, and the Ikon pass brought in a whole lot more locals, more often (but particularly on weekends and holidays, midweek was fine during the mid-season). It will be interesting to see what happens next year with the Base pass having 5 days rather than unlimited access.

Schweitzer may not fall into any other category. It doesn’t have as large a local population center nearby as at Crystal, or the resorts closest to Denver or SLC. It hasn’t been anywhere near as crowded as the other examples, and certainly not as well known as Big Sky, Taos or Aspen.

This may be the perfect test case to assess the impact of the Ikon Pass. I can’t think of many similarly sized large-ish independent (not on Ikon or Epic) resorts that are comparable in size and infrastructure, probably Grant Targhee, Whitefish, Big White, Panorama and a few others. It has enough terrain and modern infrastructure to make for a great ski vacation. It’s as easy or easier to get to than Jackson or Big Sky but doesn’t have the reputation to attract most destination-seekers. So if the Ikon Pass has a significant effect it might make Schweitzer more, dare I say, iconic.

I also wonder about a few other resorts such as Revelstoke or Kicking Horse. They’ve been on the Ikon or Epic passes but I’m not aware of increased crowding due to Ikon/Epic. How about Telluride? Are they simply too remote to be impacted significantly by Ikon/Epic? Niseko or the Remarkables?
 
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Cols714

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I think we need to define some things whenever we discuss crowding or "locals" or who gets to complain about other skiers on "their" mountain.
1. How close to the mountain do you have to live be to be a "local"? 1 mile? 2 miles? 100 miles? 500 miles? in state, in region, in country?
2. If you live close enough to the mountain to be a "local" does that mean you get a say in who skis on the mountain?
3. Every person on the mountain is contributing to the crowding. Being a "local" doesn't make you invisible to everyone else or give you priority to the mountain over anyone else. Yes obviously every skier wishes there were less other skiers on the mountain. Just like every driver wishes there was less traffic even though they are also traffic to everyone else.
4. Do I wish I lived at the base of Vail? Yep (well during ski season anyways). Would I complain about crowds if I lived there? I would (but again I would know that I am contributing to the crowds simply by being there). I would also understand that my enjoyment of Vail is no more meaningful than someone else's even if that person was a gaper who flew in to ski at Vail because I realize that other people live in the world and everything isn't about me me me.
 

dbostedo

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...not as well known as... Taos...
Maybe not, but it can't be too far off. I haven't met anyone that's not really into skiing who knows Taos. Including some folks I've skied with in New England and the mid-Atlantic. They're skiers, and they don't know Taos... and are typically surprised when I say it's in New Mexico - as in surprised that there are ski resorts in New Mexico.
 

dbostedo

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I think we need to define some things whenever we discuss crowding or "locals" or who gets to complain about other skiers on "their" mountain.
1. How close to the mountain do you have to live be to be a "local"? 1 mile? 2 miles? 100 miles? 500 miles? in state, in region, in country?
2. If you live close enough to the mountain to be a "local" does that mean you get a say in who skis on the mountain?
3. Every person on the mountain is contributing to the crowding. Being a "local" doesn't make you invisible to everyone else or give you priority to the mountain over anyone else. Yes obviously every skier wishes there were less other skiers on the mountain. Just like every driver wishes there was less traffic even though they are also traffic to everyone else.
4. Do I wish I lived at the base of Vail? Yep (well during ski season anyways). Would I complain about crowds if I lived there? I would (but again I would know that I am contributing to the crowds simply by being there). I would also understand that my enjoyment of Vail is no more meaningful than someone else's even if that person was a gaper who flew in to ski at Vail because I realize that other people live in the world and everything isn't about me me me.
For #1, I don't think there's any hard line to draw. It's a sliding scale and a personal thing for folks.

For #2, I don't think anyone has suggested that the answer to #2 is a flat-out "Yes", but you seem very worried about that. Perhaps locals could or should be consulted on how the resort implements particular policies, but that's clearly up to the resort on how they want to handle PR and growth.

#3 and #4 are correct...

But I have a lot of empathy for someone who chose to put down roots someplace, for whatever reason, and then has that condition change drastically. Whether that's choosing where to live because of uncrowded skiing, or because of access to parks or waterways, or because of particular industries or schools. In this case, folks that have spent many years skiing an uncrowded Schweitzer are now worried that it will become a crowded Schweitzer. I don't think there's much of anything to do about it, other than to empathize.
 
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Willy

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My closest area for comparison is Crystal. After being sold to Alterra, there's been a pretty significant increase in skier days and some pretty difficult parking situations, from what I understand. People leaving Seattle at 4:30 in the morning so they can get a parking spot, for example. It all sounds not inviting and there's a lot of online complaining going on regarding Alterra. We already have a parking problem at Schweitzer that will be exacerbated by the addition of Ikon, I would imagine. They are taking steps to alleviate some of the problem but adding 100 car parks is a drop in the bucket from what I see. To that end, I'm walk/ski in and out so that's not as big a concern.

As for lift lines, contrary to what another poster indicated, we've had lines all this season, some due to light loads due to Covid so I expect vast improvement as the lifts run at full capacity. The addition of Ikon, though, will likely put more pressure on the lift system. The other area of concern is on-hill accommodations for restaurants, etc. We don't have much by way of supporting business so what's there will be further impacted. We're just not yet grown into the capacity to handle a ton more people so the question is, how many more skiers will we see with the Ikon addition.

As I've noted before, what we do tend to see a lot of are Seattle area skiers who 'escape' their local areas for extended weekends. I think we'll see more of that, especially with Crystal skiers trying to escape their crowds. It's an easy drive to come over on a Thursday, ski three days and make it back home for work. Further, with so many of them working for tech companies who've adopted WFH policies, it's much easier to make the trek for a few days and still be functional for work purposes.

Just Tuesday, I was up at our condo (my company is roofing our building) and thought the building would be empty. I met a guy who I've never seen before who is WFH from the condo. We were talking, he's owned for five years but he and his wife have moved into their condo for the duration and ultimately want to move onto the mountain, once they get a bigger place nailed down. They're from Orange County, CA but love it up there.

Again, my fears are the anecdotal stories online about the crowding and the subsequent 'ruining' of these ski areas. It may not come to pass, I don't know. But it concerns me. I'm not a fan of lines for anything and some of what I see, such as the pictures I posted earlier and the one in #57 are intolerable to me.

Cols714 - You say you wish you lived at the base of Vail for the winter. That's our difference, I skied Vail 30 years ago and found it to not be enjoyable and will never return, mostly due to the clueless crowds and the 45 minute lift line in the back bowl. If I ski for 6 hours in a day and spend 4 1/2 of those hours standing in a line and a combined lift time of an hour, that's six runs for the day spent in the 30 minutes of actual skiing. That isn't skiing.

As I've stated more than once, we'll see how this goes but I have my concerns. IF, and that's a big if, management responds to the crowding with their stated long term plan, it may work out just fine. However, the LRP is slated over the next 10-15 years and they would have to accelerate it should the crowds come as they have with other areas.

One last thought, the Spokane/Kootenai County region is growing very fast. It was just announced by the WSJ and Realtor.com that Coeur d'Alene is the top emerging housing market in the country and Spokane is #5. To that end, there will be much more local traffic due to that dynamic as well. That's the kind of organic growth I would hope for. Adding Ikon visitors on top will be where the comparison to Crystal may make more sense and have impact. I'll return to this discussion during the season and give my impressions of how this is going. Could be I'm happy as a clam with all of it, who knows.

ETA: After reading the article comparing Crystal to Stevens Pass (Alterra/Ikon versus VailResorts/Epic), I'm very relieved that Schweitzer didn't hook up with Epic, at least. Their model of further reducing the Epic pass and without an eye toward improving capacity and times at Stevens sounds like a much worse situation than what my fears are of Ikon. So, there's that...
 
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Cols714

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My point wasn't tied to the specific mountain. It was just an example. Insert whatever mountain you wish and the point is the same. And again, yes standing in line sucks. But if you are standing in the line then you are contributing to the line. You are part of the problem (if you want to call it that).
 

Cols714

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But I have a lot of empathy for someone who chose to put down roots someplace, for whatever reason, and then has that condition change drastically. Whether that's choosing where to live because of uncrowded skiing, or because of access to parks or waterways, or because of particular industries or schools. In this case, folks that have spent many years skiing an uncrowded Schweitzer are now worried that it will become a crowded Schweitzer. I don't think there's much of anything to do about it, other than to empathize.
I agree it sucks for them that their situation changes and yes in a way I feel bad for that specific person. But again, by moving somewhere you have made the mountain more crowded for the people that were there before you. It's not up to you to decide that you get to be the last person to move somewhere and well now the mountain is full and nobody else should get to come and enjoy it. It all seems so selfish to me.
 

Willy

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I agree it sucks for them that their situation changes and yes in a way I feel bad for that specific person. But again, by moving somewhere you have made the mountain more crowded for the people that were there before you. It's not up to you to decide that you get to be the last person to move somewhere and well now the mountain is full and nobody else should get to come and enjoy it. It all seems so selfish to me.
For the record, I didn't move there, I've lived in this area all my life. I only bought a condo up there and it saves me 1:45 of drive-time each direction and I get the privilege of living on the hill when I'm there, usually 3-4 days per week. Yes, it's a privilege but certainly not an entitlement as you stated in another post. I worked very hard all my adult life to afford to do this and it's been a primary focus of mine to be able to do so. The concern of having it overrun by crowds is essentially a threat to my lifestyle that I've worked very hard to achieve. Can I do anything about it other than voice concerns? No. but that's my right to voice them. And I will regardless of other arguments to the contrary. Hopefully it all works out but, if it doesn't....
 

dbostedo

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It's not up to you to decide that you get to be the last person to move somewhere...
No, but it's clearly the hope of most people that move someplace. :P I suspect places that change gradually don't encounter quite as much of this... if, say, a large ski resort's attendance grew by 10,000 visits each year for 20 years, you'd have a lot less complaining or upset residents than if that same uptick of 200,000 visits happened in, say, 5 years. It's sudden or drastic change that drives a lot of rancor I think, because it's so hard to deal with.
 

Cols714

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No, but it's clearly the hope of most people that move someplace. :P I suspect places that change gradually don't encounter quite as much of this... if, say, a large ski resort's attendance grew by 10,000 visits each year for 20 years, you'd have a lot less complaining or upset residents than if that same uptick of 200,000 visits happened in, say, 5 years. It's sudden or drastic change that drives a lot of rancor I think, because it's so hard to deal with.
Oh no doubt. I'd complain too. But I'd do it knowing that my complaints are basically selfish complaints. I WANT THE MOUNTAIN TO MYSELF. And I do want the mountain to myself. I just realize that everyone else does too :):):)
 

Cols714

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For the record, I didn't move there, I've lived in this area all my life. I only bought a condo up there and it saves me 1:45 of drive-time each direction and I get the privilege of living on the hill when I'm there, usually 3-4 days per week. Yes, it's a privilege but certainly not an entitlement as you stated in another post. I worked very hard all my adult life to afford to do this and it's been a primary focus of mine to be able to do so. The concern of having it overrun by crowds is essentially a threat to my lifestyle that I've worked very hard to achieve. Can I do anything about it other than voice concerns? No. but that's my right to voice them. And I will regardless of other arguments to the contrary. Hopefully it all works out but, if it doesn't....
No one and I mean no one is doubting your hard work or anything at all. And of course you get to voice your concerns. Just do it knowing that everyone on the mountain wishes there were less people on the mountain and that "locals" take up the exact amount of space that a "non-local" does.
 

Willy

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No, but it's clearly the hope of most people that move someplace. :P I suspect places that change gradually don't encounter quite as much of this... if, say, a large ski resort's attendance grew by 10,000 visits each year for 20 years, you'd have a lot less complaining or upset residents than if that same uptick of 200,000 visits happened in, say, 5 years. It's sudden or drastic change that drives a lot of rancor I think, because it's so hard to deal with.
I agree with your comment regarding the pace of growth. To now, the growth has been more gradual and the mountain has grown at pace with it, generally speaking. Still some choke points that have shown, especially this past season but I write that off to the Covid anomaly. It's rapid growth where the mountain can't keep up that's the concern.

It's interesting to me that I've never complained about Schweitzer. Ever. I love it there. I used to ski with a couple of guys who would seemingly go out of their way to bitch about any little thing. I ultimately quit skiing with them and changed ski buddies. I just found it to be too negative and, when I'm there, I'm escaping the stress and negativity of my working life. I don't want to be that guy. I just hope this change doesn't turn me into The Jaded Local.
 
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LewyM

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My closest area for comparison is Crystal. After being sold to Alterra, there's been a pretty significant increase in skier days and some pretty difficult parking situations, from what I understand. People leaving Seattle at 4:30 in the morning so they can get a parking spot, for example. It all sounds not inviting and there's a lot of online complaining going on regarding Alterra. We already have a parking problem at Schweitzer that will be exacerbated by the addition of Ikon, I would imagine. They are taking steps to alleviate some of the problem but adding 100 car parks is a drop in the bucket from what I see. To that end, I'm walk/ski in and out so that's not as big a concern.

....

ETA: After reading the article comparing Crystal to Stevens Pass (Alterra/Ikon versus VailResorts/Epic), I'm very relieved that Schweitzer didn't hook up with Epic, at least. Their model of further reducing the Epic pass and without an eye toward improving capacity and times at Stevens sounds like a much worse situation than what my fears are of Ikon. So, there's that...
@Willy as Crystal "local" I can appreciate your apprehension, but I don't think that the dynamic of Crystal (or even worse Stevens) is even remotely similar in the near-term to Schweitzer. First of all, the Puget Sound metro area (Seattle/Tacoma/Everett/+Oly) dwarfs Spokane and northern Idaho combined. It isn't all that comparable. And although many of us look at that region longingly (per your anecdotes). . . obligations keep us in the Seattle metro area for the foreseeable future. And I doubt that the Covid work remote in a mountain town thing is really going to be all that prevalent and impactful going forward. Things change. Also, "smart" Seattle skiers already know Schweitzer and work in a trip each season. We have been a number of times, we like it a lot. I would think that our contribution to crowding and out of town visits is already "priced into" your calculations re the current quality of the experience. Ikon will drive a bit more long weekend traffic from across the Cascades - that wouldn't surprise me a bit - but I think Schweitzer has more than enough infrastructure to absorb it and weekdays should not see a significant change.

And the rationale for Ikon is entirely different for Schweitzer than it is for Crystal. In the case of Crystal (or Stevens for Epic), it is about creating incentives for the local skiing population in a major metro area to preference Ikon destinations for travel. Ikon and Epic have effectively divided the Puget Sound market. In the case of Schweitzer, it is about encouraging those with Ikon passes to consider visiting (or continue visiting) Schweitzer. Very different purpose so the comparison with Crystal doesn't really hold. The better comparison would be Taos or Jackson or Big Sky. But Jackson is unique. It is a legendary, bucket list place for most serious skiers - Ikon created an incentive to take on the hassle of access to just do it. I am a perfect example - year one of Ikon I made a trip to Jackson. I used miles for a plane ticket. Of course, Ikon was the driver of that visit.

With respect to our local hills, I think that Alterra has done a pretty good job at Crystal all considered (I also think that the Kirschers did a pretty good job as well). Crystal's core problem is base infrastructure. The last real expansion of facilities came in the 80s and early 90s and the volume assumptions are simply dated. The challenge is that infrastructure like parking and lodge capacity are really only taxed on the weekends (and in the case of lodges 2 hours each weekend day). But Crystal makes its money on the weekends and they need a plan to absorb that. These issues pre-date Ikon. From what I see, Alterra are pretty good operators of mountains with that sort of weekday/weekend delta (I think about Squaw/Alpine), so I think they can figure it out. Some of what they have been doing in Covid - pre-ordering food with an app, table reservations, food trucks, temporary shelters utilizing outdoor space, additional plumbed bathrooms, should stay post-Covid. Mountain capacity is adequate to absorb the crowds, it is a pretty big space if you can ski the whole mountain (of course there are lines in North for an hour or two on a powder day on the weekend - this isn't a heli operation). But if you are a reasonably strong skier and have a bit of local knowledge about how to navigate the mountain, over the course of even a busy Saturday you can generally avoid horrible lines most of the time (which I think is fair for a day hop mountain less than 2 hours from a growing population center). Further on the plus side, Alterra seem to appreciate the culture of the area and respects long time guests. It doesn't seem all that different or like it is being homogenized into something Crystal isn't.

On the negative side, full access under Ikon substantially drove up weekend volume even before Covid, and parking had become a mess. That was exacerbated in early winter 19-20 by a set of storm cycles that came through on weekends (something I usually appreciate as a "weekend warrior"). This was NEVER a thing at Crystal - in fact, Crystal used to beat on Stevens on this point by offering a free ticket to anyone turned away on account of parking. It usually happened once a season. They need to address this, and maybe pulling full Crystal access up to a more premium tier of Ikon will help. I appreciated that the letter from the CEO addressed this and transparently admitted that the issues were not all about "Covid." And the pressure had absolutely nothing to do with destination visitors. Only the loony fringe would make Crystal a destination trip (when there are so many other options with more reliable conditions). My guess (and I am sure Alterra has data) is that the issues were about a larger share of the Seattle market saying, "WTF, I'll by a local Ikon pass and hit Crystal on weekend powder days when Alpental is structurally tapped out and stupid." So maybe the changes will work. I'm optimistic, why not be?

Stevens is a whole other discussion. Stevens has borne the impact of regional growth much more obviously. The natural growth of the area to being fully built out to Monroe, plus growth in the towns along the Highway 2 corridor have played the biggest role in the challenges at Stevens. They just can't absorb the capacity and the drive home, through the Highway 2 lights and roundabouts is misery. I loath it on weekends which is why I rarely ski Stevens anymore (although I like the mountain, grew up skiing it and still consider it "home"). I also hear that Vail hasn't done a great job getting terrain open, respecting local culture and the like. But I haven't been to Stevens since the Vail acquisition, so that is just what I hear. In my mind, the structural problems pre-date Vail. Ironically, I am thinking of adding an Epic pass this year thanks to the pricing because I miss Stevens (the mountain part) and having Epic makes skiing Whistler semi-rational again. So in that respect, I supposed I'd be "part of the problem."

Anyway, it is not all doom and gloom over here and I think that the addition of Schweitzer to Ikon is a benefit to Seattle skiers but not likely enough to drive significant, detrimental visitation. And the local dynamic just isn't anything like Seattle (yet!), so I wouldn't worry too much, @Willy. Your real problem is when "we" move to Sandpoint and become "you" - not when "we" book a room for a few nights at the La Quinta (which is already inside the current capacity footprint).
 
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Après Skier

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How wonderful! Bravo Ikon! When the border eventually opens I look forward to a Powder Hwy trip including Schweitzer, Red, and Revelstoke. Now if Ikon could add some add’l European resorts in France, Austria, and Italy... all my dreams could come true!

Psst... Alterra, if you are listening, could you please add Tignes-Val d’Isère, Ischg-Samnaun, Saalbach-Hinterglemm-Leogang-Fieberbrunn, and Dolomiti Superski to the Ikon Pass?
 
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Errand Wolfe

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LOL "Locals". Give me a freaking break. People who actually live in a ski resort town are incredibly fortunate to be able to go ski without dealing with a ton of the hassle of skiing. Yet anytime the resort makes things a little nicer for the vast majority of skiers who don't live in a resort town they whine. The entitlement is so gross. OMG you might have to "share" this thing that you have no ownership or control over. Most little kids grasp this concept much better than the so-called "locals".
I think you making blanket decisions on whether something is "good" or "bad" when most every single day of your life that change will have zero impact on you is incredibly short sighted and simple.

Apple just announced another campus going in NC's Research Triangle Park. I can say from up here in my mountain town that is a "good thing" and dismiss everyone who disagrees with me as foolish or dumb but who am I to say if it is good or not? I don't live there and have almost no skin in the game, my opinion about it is a worthless as yours is on a ski town you do not live in. I know young professionals who live in NC and are 2 years of savings away from buying their first home. To them this announcement is nothing short of Earth shattering. They now have to decide if they can buy a house now knowing that two more years of hard work might not get them any closer to the home they want.
 

Cols714

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I think you making blanket decisions on whether something is "good" or "bad" when most every single day of your life that change will have zero impact on you is incredibly short sighted and simple.

Apple just announced another campus going in NC's Research Triangle Park. I can say from up here in my mountain town that is a "good thing" and dismiss everyone who disagrees with me as foolish or dumb but who am I to say if it is good or not? I don't live there and have almost no skin in the game, my opinion about it is a worthless as yours is on a ski town you do not live in. I know young professionals who live in NC and are 2 years of savings away from buying their first home. To them this announcement is nothing short of Earth shattering. They now have to decide if they can buy a house now knowing that two more years of hard work might not get them any closer to the home they want.
My guess is that people who don't have jobs are pretty thrilled that Apple is going to expand just like these young professionals benefited at some point to be near jobs in NC. If this means housing prices go up the area leaders can always, gasp!, allow more housing to be built. Except that the "locals" probably won't let them build more housing because when people move into a town they want to be the last people that get to move into a town. See also what has happened to San Francisco/NY/Denver. "Locals" hate when new housing gets built even though they themselves benefited from housing being built at some point. I moved into a town (and luckily bought a house) that has essentially stopped building housing and now house prices are crazy stupid high for no reason other than they won't let anyone build anymore. If we were this short-sighted in the 1940s-1970s we'd all be homeless because we'd have no place to live. Thankfully that generation realized that people needed places to live near jobs and let people build.

And again, people are allowed to not like that the mountain is partnering with IKON. And other people are allowed to be super happy about it. It's just an opinion. And being a "local" doesn't mean your opinion gets counted twice.
 

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In my experience, crowds at Schweitzer have been a bit of an issue in recent years, but better than most of the rest of the ski world. I'll try to avoid Schweitzer weekends/holidays going forward, and I hope they get more parking on-mountain soon. And the comments about how Ikon's been a quality operator at Crystal and other mountains reminds me that Schweitzer's management seems kind of bush-league in comparison to a lot of big destinations.

I agree that the biggest influx will be increased visitation from the Seattle area, where Schweitzer and Sandpoint are known and popular. But there are a lot of Ikon passholders living in California near an airport with nonstop service to Spokane. The Bay Area, Sacramento, the LA Basin, and San Diego all have substantial IKON populations, and I assume that Schweitzer must be planning to do at least a little marketing to them. Even if they lure just a small percentage of those California Ikon holders each year, it's still a significant increase.
 

Willy

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In my experience, crowds at Schweitzer have been a bit of an issue in recent years, but better than most of the rest of the ski world. I'll try to avoid Schweitzer weekends/holidays going forward, and I hope they get more parking on-mountain soon. And the comments about how Ikon's been a quality operator at Crystal and other mountains reminds me that Schweitzer's management seems kind of bush-league in comparison to a lot of big destinations.

I agree that the biggest influx will be increased visitation from the Seattle area, where Schweitzer and Sandpoint are known and popular. But there are a lot of Ikon passholders living in California near an airport with nonstop service to Spokane. The Bay Area, Sacramento, the LA Basin, and San Diego all have substantial IKON populations, and I assume that Schweitzer must be planning to do at least a little marketing to them. Even if they lure just a small percentage of those California Ikon holders each year, it's still a significant increase.
Yeah, I don't know about Schweitzer management being a bit 'bush-league' but compared to some of the mega resorts, it might appear that way. Money makes a difference in terms of what can be done and while Schweitzer may not have the same resources as the mega resorts, I think they do a really good job in trying to meet the needs of their mountain. So, I will agree to disagree with that point.

Regarding potential influx of CA or other western US skiers with direct flight access to Spokane, I hadn't really considered that too much but, you're right, even a small percentage of Ikon holders coming up could have a significant influence. I'm happy that you're able to avoid weekend crowds but I can't, at least not quite yet, maybe next season. If so, that will help. On the other hand, weekends are when my ski buddies ski and if I want to ski with them, which I do, I'll be there on weekends, too. At least on some days, we go out the gates and back country for half a day but even that has been getting tracked. What with the cat operation off the back and the increase in BC skiers, finding good lines out the gates is sometimes difficult. No matter, I'll figure out what it takes to keep it fun.
 

David Chaus

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What with the cat operation off the back and the increase in BC skiers, finding good lines out the gates is sometimes difficult. No matter, I'll figure out what it takes to keep it fun.
Simple, use your Ikon benefits with the Voyager Pass to drive up to Red Mt.
 
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