Is it possible for modern skiers to go back to pre-plastic ski outerwear and how would you imagine your skiing day/season would look like if it did?

Paul Lutes

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Enough performance can be maintained with non-plastic based outer wear that it would only be moderately disruptive to do. This would not be the case, however, with boots and skis. Leather boots and wooden skis would. be the end of days for me.
 

David Chaus

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It is the burning of fossil fuel that they are trying to stop. I didn't think that textiles and other uses of oil were being targeted as unfriendly to the planet.
Oh, well as long as the fossil fuels aren't actually burned, then it's totally OK to strip-mine, frack and otherwise disturb the environment in the extraction process.
 

Uncle-A

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Oh, well as long as the fossil fuels aren't actually burned, then it's totally OK to strip-mine, frack and otherwise disturb the environment in the extraction process.
When you say strip mine are you talking about the lithium for the batteries in EV's?
 

neonorchid

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It is an issue, isn't it?
I'm just going to cut copy and paste from Google:

lithium from Australia comes from ore mining, while in Chile and Argentina lithium comes from salt deserts, so-called salars. The extraction of raw materials from salars functions as follows: lithium-containing saltwater from underground lakes is brought to the surface and evaporates in large basins.

Excessive mining of lithium leaves the few pieces of fertile land barren. Lithium mining activities destroy the habitats and minerals that plants require to grow. So, lithium extraction is responsible for the onset of desertification in several parts of the world.Dec 31, 2021

5 New Battery Technologies That Will Change the Future
  • NanoBolt lithium tungsten batteries. Working on battery anode materials, researchers at N1 Technologies, Inc. ...
  • Zinc-manganese oxide batteries. ...
  • Organosilicon electrolyte batteries. ...
  • Gold nanowire gel electrolyte batteries. ...
  • TankTwo String Cell™ batteries.
 

Powder High

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5 New Battery Technologies That Will Change the Future
  • NanoBolt lithium tungsten batteries. Working on battery anode materials, researchers at N1 Technologies, Inc. ...
  • Zinc-manganese oxide batteries. ...
  • Organosilicon electrolyte batteries. ...
  • Gold nanowire gel electrolyte batteries. ...
  • TankTwo String Cell™ batteries.

Just wondering, how many degrees warmer will the earth be before we can develop new technologies like this and get them into large scale production.
 

neonorchid

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Just wondering, how many degrees warmer will the earth be before we can develop new technologies like this and get them into large scale production.
Sadly the pessimist in me doesn't think wild temps will do it ... perhaps the "Water Wars" will get heads out of asses:nono:
 

Ken_R

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I love natural fibers! But not the price. Example:

Screen Shot 2022-05-25 at 10.56.33 AM.png
 

James

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Not buying the price issue. You could post a dozen shirts made from a bucket of oil in Vietnam that cost the same.
Btw, Vermont once was the sheep capital of the world in the mid 19th century. There were far fewer trees then as they were cut for wood and grazing.

You can blame the spreading of Merino Sheep on Napoleon. Before he invaded Spain the sheep were really only in Spain apparently. Then they were allowed to be exported by the Spanish. Brought to the US by William Jarvis of VT. “Merino Mania” ensued.

3A0D1069-6736-439F-A28A-86EEF2DFA11D.jpeg

 

Uncle-A

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Not buying the price issue. You could post a dozen shirts made from a bucket of oil in Vietnam that cost the same.
Btw, Vermont once was the sheep capital of the world in the mid 19th century. There were far fewer trees then as they were cut for wood and grazing.

You can blame the spreading of Merino Sheep on Napoleon. Before he invaded Spain the sheep were really only in Spain apparently. Then they were allowed to be exported by the Spanish. Brought to the US by William Jarvis of VT. “Merino Mania” ensued.

View attachment 170052
Vermont the sheep capital on the world, who would have quests. I would have thought it was Australia but maybe it just because of the timing, a mid 19th century thing.
 

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