Joining Patrol - The French way

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Idris

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Update. I know that France is the land of bureaucracy, I've lived here for 20 years and I have everything bar a French passport (future work in progress). But today we went over just the basic stuff for a ski resort, it's a wonder ANYTHING is allowed to function, there is a rule for everything! Although one interesting one, the Mayor of the community who is an elected politician, is Ultimatley responsible for safety and CAN go to jail when things go south! BUT suing isn't realy a thing here because if you do your I's and cross your T's and then plain and simple just fuck up by accident, your arse is covered and there will be no court case.
 

Après Skier

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Very interesting. Thank you for bringing us along on your journey. Comme on dit en français, Bon courage !
 
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Nobody

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Update. I know that France is the land of bureaucracy, I've lived here for 20 years and I have everything bar a French passport (future work in progress). But today we went over just the basic stuff for a ski resort, it's a wonder ANYTHING is allowed to function, there is a rule for everything! Although one interesting one, the Mayor of the community who is an elected politician, is Ultimatley responsible for safety and CAN go to jail when things go south! BUT suing isn't realy a thing here because if you do your I's and cross your T's and then plain and simple just fuck up by accident, your arse is covered and there will be no court case.
Welcome! Italy isn't any different. As an example a town mayor can order a ban (for a definite perido of time) on off-piste activities if and when it sees fit.
 
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Idris

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Survived the first week and my first written exam in French (my first aid courses all had practical exams).
I now have a CGMM BPS 1ere Degre (yes the french system loves its achronisms).
Onto next week, still (mostly) indoors but with more practical stuff, or so we have been prommised.
 
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Idris

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Comming to the end of week 2. A few things that may be different in other parts of the world.
There are quite specific about the difference between simple (knee, ankle, lower leg, forearm, wrist, elbow, ilness, shoulder (without deformation) none with serious pain/swelling) and serious rescues, all of which need medical intervention and or extraction, which means doctor and or helicopter. We are somewhat spoiled in that all the alpine departments have 2 or more medical helicopters and normaly 3 or more private ones that can also be called in.
Official text says simple needs 2 and serious requires 4-5 patrolers, but also our instructors are explaining that post exam reality is 1 and 3, but hitting the help/panic/advice (we have a sysytem in place to ask for direct medical advice) button is still set at the same level.
We did a whole day of psychology - what clients/management/patrol wants for their perspective, what definds a persons perspetive and dealing with emergency situations form a patroler and from a patient standpoint and the conflict advoidance/mitigation.
I think our day with an emergency room doctor giving us his view of our world (he is one of the mountain specialists that jumps in a heli and comes to help) should be familiar to alt least some others?
Now we are getting into Avie procedures, Beacons etc.....but for many, because of their background/age is quite unfamailiar ground.....luck for me I have tought this stuff, just not in French.
 

Rod9301

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Generally speaking (for Italy), yes, one can.
Either as an employee to one of the resort ski schools (which are not part nor usually associated to the "resort" aka the lift company) or as an indipendent. The only requirement is to be (legally) certified. A "small" caveat, one needs also be affiliated with the region of choice Ski Instructor's Council, and then will only be allowed to teach only in that regon. Despite the title being nationwide valid, to move from one region to another, it requires a bit of bueraucratic work As for patrolling...In Italy patrolling, either inbound or outbound is done by the army (mountain troops - the "Alpini") or law enforcement mountain branches (Police, Carabinieri, Guardia di Finanza). Outbound is also done by the CNAS (Corpo Nazionale Alpino e Spelologico - Alpine and "Cave" National Corp, its members are mostly Alpine guides, on a volunteer basis). Inbound some volunteer organizations are also starting to appear (as Idris explain, one need to pass the basic "first responder" volunteer coursee, 80 hours on first aid, procedures and standards, then the real patroller course starts)
Yes, same everywhere in Europe.
And because the resort doesn't have s monopoly on teaching, prices are a lot lower.
In my resort in France, a private hour is 45 euros and the instructor keeps 40 euros.
 
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