Gear Light weight AT ski and binding for NE backcountry

charlier

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-@Pequenita mentioned non removable brakes, and I am most familiar with the ATK line regarding removing brakes, so that why I answered about those. I am sure there are other brands and models where they are removable as well.
@Slim thanks for the post. One comment on removable brakes. In my limited experience (two seasons) with G3 Zed bindings with removable brakes, Zed brakes are flimsy, deploy unexpected, and feel like they are made in a toy factory. Similar experiences with other brands that offer removable brakes as well. For relatively light and metal bindings, the AmerSports brakes are solid and are not prone to breakage. Same with Dynafit. My advice is to either purchase binding with solid, non-removable brakes or bindings with leaches.
 
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ScottB

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I could go either way on the brakes. I am curious where you attach the ski leash to? I would guess the toe piece of the binding and maybe a lower boot buckle?

I took a look at the Pyrenees site, good prices. I think I like the 2023 ATK Crest bindings since they have a moveable heel and some elastic travel.

I am not sure about DIN numbers. On an alpine binding I ski at 9.5 usually, so will need at least a 10 setting if the DIN setting on an AT binding corresponds to alpine DIN's. I suspect it is not a crossover. I am also 108 kg's, so I might need a higher rated binding. I will say I am not hard on bindings and don't stress them much since I don't blast through mogul fields anymore. With AT gear, I certainly won't be doing that ever.
 
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ScottB

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Then not the Rise Above, it is similar to zero G 95. Skis rounder, but the tail performs when pressured - very directional.

That's not what I have been reading about the Volkl Rise, its more like the MTN Explore, meaning more forgiving. It is still on the directional side of the fence, but a step towards the middle compared to the Zero G.

Volkl claims this ski is the "most versatile ski" in its line of touring skis for the 21/22 season, and we find it quite hard to disagree. While some skis are good at everything but great at nothing, the Rise Above 88 excels across the board. Tip rocker and a floaty 131mm tip make skiing through anything even resembling powder a playful and jubilant time. Full-length sidewalls and just the right amount of underfoot camber provide stability and edge power that will get you down the nastiest of spring couloirs without a slip - a critical consideration for mountaineering but is also appreciated by skiers of all breeds. Three different turn radii along the length of the ski comprise the laudable 3D Radius Sidecut. The tip and tail prefer long arcing turns and high speeds while underfoot the ski is agile and fast-reacting allowing you to change your turn shape on a dime (just in time to dodge that tree).

After reading this again, not so sure about my impression of the ski. It might be very similar to the Zero G??? Not many reviews on this ski out yet. They don't have it in my size at Corbetts, so looking seriously at the MTN Explore 88.
 
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ScottB

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Found this on ATK:

1663696317034.png
 

slow-line-fast

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That's not what I have been reading about the Volkl Rise, its more like the MTN Explore, meaning more forgiving. It is still on the directional side of the fence, but a step towards the middle compared to the Zero G.

Volkl claims this ski is the "most versatile ski" in its line of touring skis for the 21/22 season, and we find it quite hard to disagree. While some skis are good at everything but great at nothing, the Rise Above 88 excels across the board. Tip rocker and a floaty 131mm tip make skiing through anything even resembling powder a playful and jubilant time. Full-length sidewalls and just the right amount of underfoot camber provide stability and edge power that will get you down the nastiest of spring couloirs without a slip - a critical consideration for mountaineering but is also appreciated by skiers of all breeds. Three different turn radii along the length of the ski comprise the laudable 3D Radius Sidecut. The tip and tail prefer long arcing turns and high speeds while underfoot the ski is agile and fast-reacting allowing you to change your turn shape on a dime (just in time to dodge that tree).

After reading this again, not so sure about my impression of the ski. It might be very similar to the Zero G??? Not many reviews on this ski out yet. They don't have it in my size at Corbetts, so looking seriously at the MTN Explore 88.
I've skied both zero G 95, 17/18 season, and rise above 88, 21/22 season. In comparison the rise above has all the kick of the zero G without the jitteriness, so more round skiing. But it for sure is a directional ski, like the zero G if you get a little backseat, it won't let you out of that turn. It's playful as a slalom ski is playful, gives a lot back but you have to be on it. It's what I look for in a ski and I like it. I don't do spinning/switch stuff so can't comment on that, but assume there would be other skis much better for that.
 
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charlier

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I have skied ZeroG skis for years. The skis are not playful, and the stiff tail can be punishing. Similarly, I have used the MTN Explore for two seasons and the ski is more forgiving than the ZeroG, but it is not a playful ski.

DIN setting in touring bindings, let’s not get started on this topic. My personal feeling is that the Tech binding DIN is merely a suggestion and do not believe the marketing hype. FYI, leaches attach from the toe piece to the lower buckle of your boot. You might not need leaches while you tour near to your house. Sorry for my slightly grumpy post.
 
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ScottB

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I've skied both zero G 95, 17/18 season, and rise above 88, 21/22 season. In comparison the rise above has all the kick of the zero G without the jitteriness, so more round skiing. But it for sure is a directional ski, like the zero G if you get a little backseat, it won't let you out of that turn. It's playful as a slalom ski is playful, gives a lot back but you have to be on it. It's what I look for in a ski and I like it. I don't do spinning/switch stuff so can't comment on that, but assume there would be other skis much better for that.
Thanks for this feedback. Good to hear from someone who has skied them. Sounds like I would prefer the MTN, but I would be OK with the Volkl as well.

Seems like the MTN explore from Corbits for $325 and a Crest binding from Pyrenees for $330 is a good deal.
 

Slim

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@ScottB , like @charlier says, release values for most tech bindings are not certified, still I would consider that all the more reason to get a binding where you have enough ’leeway’ to either side, so the Crest 10 (aka Hagan Pure) might not be a good choice if you normally run your RV at 9.5.

Granted, if you selected ’type III’ and you ski more like ‘type II’ in the backcountry (certainly my behavior), you’d drop down one , to end at 8.5, so maybe a ‘fantasy tech‘ release value of 10 would be sufficient. My resort ski (type II) is set for RV 8, and I dialed that same number in my Crests, and so far, so good, but I have not fallen very often in them. But also no unwanted releases, even when hop turning.
 
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