Long and heavy charger skis

tromano

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I’m extremely skeptical that any of the recent, relatively light Stormriders are going to feel anything like a Head Monster or Legend Pro Rider even if the Stockli’s might be impressively damp and well constructed on their own terms. I believe the Stockli’s people thought of as being chargers are substantially older than 2020.

Have you looked at Heritage Lab? I really think their race room series is probably the best bet you can still buy new for the old school wide GS style skis. If you’re open to more modern wider shapes the Rossi squad is probably in there too.

Heritage link:
They don't feel like a head monster. Sr88 vs monster 88 The weight and flex pattern are different. Stockli have a lot of their stiffness and power in the tail and are pretty subtle in the tip. If you try to apply lots of early bof pressure at the top of the turn the stockli don't respond seems like they are over powered before they can hook up. But I you take a more centered stance patience in transition, they respond really well.

Head monster 88/98 are stiff tip to tail and have a pretty engaging and supportive tip. They hook up early like a carving ski and reward agression early.

Kastle mx99 have the same subtle tip as the stocklis, but a bit more balanced.
 
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chris_the_wrench

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AngryAnalyst

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They don't feel like a head monster. Sr88 vs monster 88 The weight and flex pattern are different. Stockli have a lot of their stiffness and power in the tail and are pretty subtle in the tip. If you try to apply lots of early bof pressure at the top of the turn the stockli don't respond seems like they are over powered before they can hook up. But I you take a more centered stance patience in transition, they respond really well.

This is super interesting, as I said I haven’t been on a Stormrider ever. Thank you for the info. It doesn’t abstractly make a ton of sense to me that a ski would be very stable at high speeds while having the performance attributes you mention later in this comment. If I get the chance to try them sometime I’ll try a more patient turn initiation. Is that true of the Laser AX too? I have demoed the longest length a few times and tended to feel a bit underwhelmed vs. the consensus here, but I could easily believe I jam into the shovels reflexively.

The only ski I have been on that sounds anything like that was probably a Renoun Endurance and there I was pretty sure it was because the special polymer stuff was actually adjusting the ski flex a bit.
 

tomahawkins

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Rebound VibeStop, Stockli TurtleShell, Head Energy Management Circuit. All claim to block the bad vibrations and let the good vibes through. Is it technology? Is it marketing? Wish I knew what really works and what’s BS…
 

ski otter 2

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This is super interesting, as I said I haven’t been on a Stormrider ever. Thank you for the info. It doesn’t abstractly make a ton of sense to me that a ski would be very stable at high speeds while having the performance attributes you mention later in this comment. If I get the chance to try them sometime I’ll try a more patient turn initiation. Is that true of the Laser AX too? I have demoed the longest length a few times and tended to feel a bit underwhelmed vs. the consensus here, but I could easily believe I jam into the shovels reflexively.

The only ski I have been on that sounds anything like that was probably a Renoun Endurance and there I was pretty sure it was because the special polymer stuff was actually adjusting the ski flex a bit.
The longer AX (and the Laser/& Montero series in general) has a different set of objectives than the current Stormriders, seems like: it is frontside biased, maximum target focus being its rebound/carves, while the Stormriders are for "all mountain," in both terrain and snow conditions.

The 88 and 95 Stormriders, going back a few years, have settled on a construction that results in what @tromano accurately described, but the purpose of that construction centers in how it handles soft snow, and soft snow off piste: that tip is designed to rise a bit for powder/crud, so that it remains smooth and non-hooky, while still charging/carving well - top in class for such a ski. Yes, it still carves through anything, but that slight bit of lift to the tip creates a very smooth carve in up to, say, half a foot of powder (more or less depending on the skier). To me, even this bit of float/lift means the ski is too far under the snow, rather than being lifted enough for maximum fun in such conditions; but those two stormriders are, to me, like dependable metronomes in mixed and soft conditions because of that tip that is so "subtle."

Since I'm not so big a skier, I don't have to worry about overpowering that tip, as long as I don't drive it hard, but instead get on the uphill ski early, feel where the edges like to be, how they like to flex, etc. But a bigger skier would have that problem.

For example, I have a bigger friend (former good racer) who skis both the SR 105 and the SR 88 depending on the snow and terrain. He "handicaps" himself by using telemark tech bindings, and that way, he is forever "platforming" the ski, instead of driving it forward into the tips - just goes with what telemarking requires. He charges.

But on more charger, race-like skis myself, I have to be careful not to drive too hard with him, to not go past him with little effort, because he wants to be ahead at all times, as if in a contest, and his "platforming" those SR skis is slower than charging/flexing on edge with a ski made for that more specifically.
 
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Brian Finch

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PSA - $179 w/ code

 

tromano

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This is super interesting, as I said I haven’t been on a Stormrider ever. Thank you for the info. It doesn’t abstractly make a ton of sense to me that a ski would be very stable at high speeds while having the performance attributes you mention later in this comment. If I get the chance to try them sometime I’ll try a more patient turn initiation. Is that true of the Laser AX too? I have demoed the longest length a few times and tended to feel a bit underwhelmed vs. the consensus here, but I could easily believe I jam into the shovels reflexively.

The only ski I have been on that sounds anything like that was probably a Renoun Endurance and there I was pretty sure it was because the special polymer stuff was actually adjusting the ski flex a bit.
I tend to agree with you. The way the Sr88 skis didn't really appeal to me.
 

tromano

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Makes it an OK beginner-bumper ski tho.
My experience on sr88 is just one demo. Given that, bumps were where me and the Sr88 got along the least. The tails felt pretty locked in most of the time. So the steering on the backside of bump didn't work very well for me. Bascily it's the last ski I would put a newbie bump skier on. Ymmv
 

cantunamunch

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My experience on sr88 is just one demo. Given that, bumps were where me and the Sr88 got along the least. The tails felt pretty locked in most of the time. So the steering on the backside of bump didn't work very well for me. Bascily it's the last ski I would put a newbie bump skier on. Ymmv
...for people who steer from the front ;)
 

silverback

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Good PSA but not sure this is the right thread.
 

ski otter 2

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I found this to be a good reality check to the part of this thread messing with SR 88s, etc.
I have not skied that new Experience ski, but folks have liked the 86ti a lot,
as being more practical and versatile, and less narrowly focused, than the SRs in question.

Heck, maybe that new 88HD Experience, in its longest length, might actually be a fairly good charger, dunno.
 

silverback

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Not a long heavy charger?
Is it an under-the-radar charger?

2100g
19m radius
No metal
Under 190cm
From Phil’s review:
  • Who is it for? Groomer zoomers. The E88 with its aggressive shape loves to be up on edge.
  • Who is it not for? Skiers who spend more time off piste.
 

GregK

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It’s the shorter radius(17m in 180cm) in the older 88 HD along with the blunt/catchy tip design that holds it back as far as high speed cruising goes. Actually a pretty stiff ski with good weight but it’s not a fan of heavy afternoon crud.
Think I’ve sold about 3 or 4 pairs of previous skis to owners of Experience skis around that vintage as they were so much work in catchy snow.

That’s why the new Experience line are a revelation in comparison as they have the long effective edge like these yet the tip design easily glides through crud. Still too light with a shorter radius for a true charger but a great option for others.
 

Tom K.

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That’s why the new Experience line are a revelation in comparison as they have the long effective edge like these yet the tip design easily glides through crud.

QFT
 

tromano

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Probably posted this up thread a few years ago. But bears repeating. I think there alot more stout am skis that can be charged on, than there are purpose built as chargers - well suited for charging in "all" conditions. Sometimes a good am ski is all you really need.

Another point is that to me charging is really an open terrain thing. If the lines get smaller the skis I want for charging changes - a lot. Want a much slarvier ski for the chutes than in the bowls.
 
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