Individual Review Moment Wildcat 108

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Ron

Ron

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From my reading of reviews, your guess that the Wildcat 108 is stiffer is likely correct. And in that regard, could conceivably be better through chopped up powder on the way down to the lift. However, I would be surprised that it is otherwise more "stable" than the Alchemist 100RP.

No wrongs, rights or betters here. No doubt they are both superb skis for their intended use. My application is more directed towards tight trees while yours may be more open trees and slopes.

How about this. You demo the DPS Alchemist Wailer 100RP and I will demo the Moment Wildcat 108. And we will compare notes?

if I ever get the chance, I certainly will.
 

Tom K.

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The tail is a twin with rocker which is great for those who ski or land switch.

I decided to mount the ski a little behind the line (factory mount point is -6cm from center) because I am a 100% directional skier and I don't do park laps.

A little twinning on the tail can offer some forgiveness in bumps. My old Firearrow 80s are the friendliest carving skis I've ever skied in the bumps.

Mount Point: My brother from another mother.......but minus 6 is bold. Glad it worked out!
 
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Ron

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Im obviously not the target audience of that video (and most Moment vids) as I dont think it really matters what ski you are on when you spend 90% of the day in the air. :).
 

Ecimmortal

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One of these days I would love to get on a WC108 and compare it to the Jeffery 108 due to the similarities.
 
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Ron

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I got a couple more powder days now on the Wildcats, simply fantastic ski. nothing to add as far as new thoughts just love this ski. so stable in the open while getting to the lifts and so much fun in trees and big bumps. so easy and flickable while supremely stable.
 

Flo

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I (5'9" - 160lbs, fairly aggressive early advanced skier) tested their big brothers (OG Wildcat 116mm) last week in Tahoe. Conditions ranged from 4 inches to 1 foot of fresh / chopped snow. I had a blast, they are very easy to pivot but can also hold an edge on firmer snow. What really impressed me is how they allow you to go through chopped snow at full speed like nothing has happened. This is something that I can't do with my Rustler 9. I hesitated a long time between these Wildcat and the Rustler 11. I ultimately decided to buy the Wildcat because I got a great deal but I think that I made the right choice and will keep them for a long time.
GOPR0287.png
 
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GregK

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What really impressed me is how they allow you to go through chopped snow at full speed like nothing has happened.

I told ya! Always floors me how easy crud or tracked snow is on them. Feels like you’re going slower than you as they are so stable at speed.

Very Glad to hear you’re happy with them!
 
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Ron

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even the 108's are super-eerily stable through chop! Stay centered on them and they just cruise. It must be the Lava Space-Goddess. :)
 

ejj

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My dusty rose Moment Hoody weighs about 10 pounds. It is a serious piece of cotton.
 

Pete in Idaho

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Moment Wildcat 108, 184. Skied at Steamboat.

I have been searching for a powder ski that was more on the stiff, burly side but was still fun and quick in the trees. I have tested quite a few excellent ski's lately but none were what I was personally looking for. @jmeb has been nudging me for the past couple of seasons to give the Moments a try. I took a look at the Wildcat 108 and it really seemed to be in-line with what I was looking for. It took some searching on line to find a shop that actually had a a 184 in stock but I eventually tracked a pair down and parted with my cash on a ski I was hoping would fit a rather long list of "wants". Upon arrival and inspection, the build quality was excellent and the ski looked very high-end. Most people love the Moment graphics, I personally would have loved the Astronaut top sheets from last year over this years versions but they are extremely popular and people love them. The matte finish on the top sheet is really nice though. As long as they are covered in powder, I'm good with them. :) The ski has considerable rocker in both the tips and tails but the genius in this ski is how Moment applied the rocker. It splays up at the furthest point of the tip but comes down and maintains a low splay, with a longer "run" of the rocker. I think this is why the ski pivots and is so quick in the trees but is so stable when put on edge. The ski feels longer than the just under 182cm actual length. The tail is a twin with rocker which is great for those who ski or land switch. My initial thoughts was that the tail would feel short or not be supportive, however, this simply isn't the case. Again , thoughtful design. The overall flex is: slightly softer at the furthest ends of the tips, then quickly stiffening at the mid-shovel and stiff just in front, under foot and behind the heel and then then softening up slightly in the tail. the end of the tail has a similar flex as the tip. When skiing, the ski feels firm and supportive but light.

I decided to mount the ski a little behind the line (factory mount point is -6cm from center) because I am a 100% directional skier and I don't do park laps. I decided after discussing this with Moment and a couple of folks here who ski Moments, and doing some mathematical calculations, I decided to go with -7mm back. Math is rarely wrong. I don't think those who are about my 5' 11+ and 175# could tell any difference with a full CM but I am very happy with the mount location. It's still super quick and responsive and I never felt the tips were too short. I never felt I needed more out front. And, the tail felt long enough providing good support. After 3 days of deep powder skiing, I am really happy right where they are. I love Warden bindings so the choice was easy. I had the ski's mounted up and prepped (note: during my day 1 testing, I noticed the bases were railed. I took them to EdgeWerks who does fantastic tuning who confirmed the bases were slightly off (no more than any other new ski) but somehow during the mounting, there were small undulations under the toe and heel on the bases of both skis, Ryan (the owner) was able to correct the issues easily but put a new base structure on the ski and tuned to 1:2.)

Day 1 I got up on the mountain and found some really good testing grounds for the Moment Wildcat 108; boot to mid-thigh light snow. Visibility was really tough, low clouds, 20mph winds and heavy snow. In the deep, the 184 Wildcat 108's are super fun, they were really agile, quick and flickable. I loved them here, you could feel the stiffness in the fore-body but the tips absorb and flex well and the tail felt perfect supporting me well when finishing turns on the steeper terrain, I honestly didn't even notice the tail which to me means its doing its job. They are really easy for fun slash turns, hanging your tails in the pow. Its not a super damp ski but has a good feel with a lot of energy and pop and the stiffness can be felt (in a good way). Although its not a light-weight touring ski, it skis quite light and easy. Skiing down from the top of the Ridge off the top of the Morningside chair, it's fairly steep with lots of small evergreens, rocks and wind loaded swales. It was "white out" conditions, allowing very limited visibility to what I was skiing into. I was skiing in giant wind loaded lips and pockets that were breaking on my thighs and then your feet would drop out from beneath you landing on wind-scoured, primary surface snow. It was a lot of fun and the Wildcat does a fantastic job here. The ski was dependable and made these conditions manageable. On abrupt drops and hitting wind lips straight on, the ski did and outstanding job of keeping things calm and not jolting me off balance. I credit that to the stiffer build that doesn't over-flex, bucking you forward. The heavily rockered tail is supportive and never felt too short. For a 184 ski, the Wildcat skis longer and more like most 186's.

I don't jump off anything more than 3-4' but love to pop off small features like snow-covered trees, downed trees and small rocks and the ski is very stable and even if you were a little back, it was easy to recover and pull the ski back under you. On the steeper faces, the ski pivoted very well, it doesn't pivot as quick as the Dynastar M-free 108 but I prefer how this ski responds to input, I like that it wasn't too "turny", meaning that when you pivot on the steeps in tight slots, you really just want it to rotate 180* and stop; some skis want to keep rotating Again, the stiffer build is solid and can be driven without folding. The Wildcats can be skied in a loose "surfy" manner though or more traditional, its quite amenable to either style. I attribute these traits to the Wildcats tapered tips and tails. The design isn't as dramatic as some, and the widest part of the skis (contact points) are located more towards the tops of the tips/tails which makes it a little less eager to pivot but the longer rocker profile and lightness makes the ski pivot just fine in tight trees. Here's where a factory mount (-6) would make the ski pivot a little quicker.

There's a section at the top of Morningside (bowl) where there's a small knoll and drops off significantly on the backside. Because of where/how its positioned, the snow loads at the top and on the backside, when I skied up on it and dropped in, the snow literally was at my crotch, the skis stiffer body just went through the snow unfazed and at the bottom where there is a small compression, it flexed very well and I flowed through. Not all powder skis do this, those with softer tips can flex too much bucking you. Skiing some lower angle pow through small evergreens and undulating terrain was pure joy, the ski's playful side showed though and I was zipping around making quick, abrupt direction changes, riding luge sections between trees, popping off little features. Redirecting the skis in the air was effortless by sucking your legs up and rotating your feet. This is where I think I enjoyed the Wildcat 108's the most. The ski responds to input very well and is smooth in the powder. Float is excellent. You could bury the tips but they never submarined or got bogged down. It handled 2 plus feet without any issues.

DAY 2: I had the skis tuned by EdgeWerks. They totally transformed the Wildcats! I didn't even detune the ski, they skied so perfectly. We woke up to 4-5" of really light powder. A "good enough" day to test the Moment a little more and to see how it would handle more open terrain and modest fresh snow skiing. With the ski now skiing as it should, I loved this ski even more. I started out on the Ridge area again, steeper faces, large bumps and small trees. The ski handles this terrain remarkably well. The Wildcat is a solid ski and I really appreciated the ability to push the tips into the bumps and swales and have it support me well. Its also solid underfoot so I trusted this ski when pushing it. I knew I loved this ski in powder and tight places but what I was truly blown away by how amazing this ski is on open terrain. I popped out of the trees onto "Buddys Run", a blue run with a nice pitch that was a mix of untracked and broken 5". The Wildcat eats this terrain up! Put it on edge and it will blast through tracked snow like it's fresh snow with an uncanny calmness and stability. The Wildcat is easy to ski here. I have never skied so fast with total confidence. The ski remains composed and quiet and releasing the edges in the transition is smooth and confidence inspiring.

DAY 3. I skied the Moment Wildcat 108's in Champagne Powder, knee deep and up to the crotch. The trees were wind loaded and untracked. I have never skied the trees with such ease and total confidence in a ski. I was skiing much faster but with more control through tight aspens. The Ski is so easy to pivot for tight turns and is stable when dropping down in bump-out troughs in the trees. You can charge on the Wildcat and blast through piles and depend on the tips and tails to support you when driving the ski.

For a 108 wide ski, the Wildcat is easy to get on edge and it arc'd far better than I expected. I was very confident carving on the groomers, It arc's smoothly and calmly and even with the heavily rockered tail, theres enough there to support you through the turn. It's quite quick and snappy here and I really had a lot of fun mixing up turn shapes; hitting patch of untracked, then arcing over for a few turns and hitting some pockets of fresh along the edges and then hitting a few powder bumps on my way to the lift. This was not "surviving" like you do on some powder ski's, this was all about fun.

To Summarize, The 184 Wildcat 108 is a really fun, nimble and solid ski that can be skied loose or more traditional in powder. The Wildcats have a nice blend of traits that favor deeper powder but are a blast in 4-5". The Wildcats thrive in playful terrain as well as steep faces and tight trees. It truly lives up to what Moment calls their "Playful Charger". I give this ski my "Best Powder and Tree Ski" award for ticking every box on the list of traits I was looking for. It may not be for everyone, and it will reward those with skills and some power and punish those who get behind the turn, too light or lack the strength to drive this ski. I can understand the excitement and enthusiasm around this ski (and Im sure other Moments) and add myself to the fan club.

Attached Pics are my testing grounds over the 3 days.
Thanks Ron, got a pair coming.
 

Tony Storaro

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Thanks Ron, got a pair coming.

You gonna love these. The only downside is hard groomers performance, in fact not a downside but a feature-they need to be brought to speed to perform. They truly come alive after 50km/h. Not a ski that pulls you into turn, need to be skied.
 

Tony Storaro

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The 190cm 118cm Wildcat makes 70km/hr through crud feel like you’re walking. :cool:Boring until 60km/hr plus on groomers with their 27m radius though.

My point exactly. Mine are 190 108 and they are asleep until 50 km/h. All the fun happens after that.
 

Pete in Idaho

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Moment Wildcat 108, 184. Skied at Steamboat.

I have been searching for a powder ski that was more on the stiff, burly side but was still fun and quick in the trees. I have tested quite a few excellent ski's lately but none were what I was personally looking for. @jmeb has been nudging me for the past couple of seasons to give the Moments a try. I took a look at the Wildcat 108 and it really seemed to be in-line with what I was looking for. It took some searching on line to find a shop that actually had a a 184 in stock but I eventually tracked a pair down and parted with my cash on a ski I was hoping would fit a rather long list of "wants". Upon arrival and inspection, the build quality was excellent and the ski looked very high-end. Most people love the Moment graphics, I personally would have loved the Astronaut top sheets from last year over this years versions but they are extremely popular and people love them. The matte finish on the top sheet is really nice though. As long as they are covered in powder, I'm good with them. :) The ski has considerable rocker in both the tips and tails but the genius in this ski is how Moment applied the rocker. It splays up at the furthest point of the tip but comes down and maintains a low splay, with a longer "run" of the rocker. I think this is why the ski pivots and is so quick in the trees but is so stable when put on edge. The ski feels longer than the just under 182cm actual length. The tail is a twin with rocker which is great for those who ski or land switch. My initial thoughts was that the tail would feel short or not be supportive, however, this simply isn't the case. Again , thoughtful design. The overall flex is: slightly softer at the furthest ends of the tips, then quickly stiffening at the mid-shovel and stiff just in front, under foot and behind the heel and then then softening up slightly in the tail. the end of the tail has a similar flex as the tip. When skiing, the ski feels firm and supportive but light.

I decided to mount the ski a little behind the line (factory mount point is -6cm from center) because I am a 100% directional skier and I don't do park laps. I decided after discussing this with Moment and a couple of folks here who ski Moments, and doing some mathematical calculations, I decided to go with -7mm back. Math is rarely wrong. I don't think those who are about my 5' 11+ and 175# could tell any difference with a full CM but I am very happy with the mount location. It's still super quick and responsive and I never felt the tips were too short. I never felt I needed more out front. And, the tail felt long enough providing good support. After 3 days of deep powder skiing, I am really happy right where they are. I love Warden bindings so the choice was easy. I had the ski's mounted up and prepped (note: during my day 1 testing, I noticed the bases were railed. I took them to EdgeWerks who does fantastic tuning who confirmed the bases were slightly off (no more than any other new ski) but somehow during the mounting, there were small undulations under the toe and heel on the bases of both skis, Ryan (the owner) was able to correct the issues easily but put a new base structure on the ski and tuned to 1:2.)

Day 1 I got up on the mountain and found some really good testing grounds for the Moment Wildcat 108; boot to mid-thigh light snow. Visibility was really tough, low clouds, 20mph winds and heavy snow. In the deep, the 184 Wildcat 108's are super fun, they were really agile, quick and flickable. I loved them here, you could feel the stiffness in the fore-body but the tips absorb and flex well and the tail felt perfect supporting me well when finishing turns on the steeper terrain, I honestly didn't even notice the tail which to me means its doing its job. They are really easy for fun slash turns, hanging your tails in the pow. Its not a super damp ski but has a good feel with a lot of energy and pop and the stiffness can be felt (in a good way). Although its not a light-weight touring ski, it skis quite light and easy. Skiing down from the top of the Ridge off the top of the Morningside chair, it's fairly steep with lots of small evergreens, rocks and wind loaded swales. It was "white out" conditions, allowing very limited visibility to what I was skiing into. I was skiing in giant wind loaded lips and pockets that were breaking on my thighs and then your feet would drop out from beneath you landing on wind-scoured, primary surface snow. It was a lot of fun and the Wildcat does a fantastic job here. The ski was dependable and made these conditions manageable. On abrupt drops and hitting wind lips straight on, the ski did and outstanding job of keeping things calm and not jolting me off balance. I credit that to the stiffer build that doesn't over-flex, bucking you forward. The heavily rockered tail is supportive and never felt too short. For a 184 ski, the Wildcat skis longer and more like most 186's.

I don't jump off anything more than 3-4' but love to pop off small features like snow-covered trees, downed trees and small rocks and the ski is very stable and even if you were a little back, it was easy to recover and pull the ski back under you. On the steeper faces, the ski pivoted very well, it doesn't pivot as quick as the Dynastar M-free 108 but I prefer how this ski responds to input, I like that it wasn't too "turny", meaning that when you pivot on the steeps in tight slots, you really just want it to rotate 180* and stop; some skis want to keep rotating Again, the stiffer build is solid and can be driven without folding. The Wildcats can be skied in a loose "surfy" manner though or more traditional, its quite amenable to either style. I attribute these traits to the Wildcats tapered tips and tails. The design isn't as dramatic as some, and the widest part of the skis (contact points) are located more towards the tops of the tips/tails which makes it a little less eager to pivot but the longer rocker profile and lightness makes the ski pivot just fine in tight trees. Here's where a factory mount (-6) would make the ski pivot a little quicker.

There's a section at the top of Morningside (bowl) where there's a small knoll and drops off significantly on the backside. Because of where/how its positioned, the snow loads at the top and on the backside, when I skied up on it and dropped in, the snow literally was at my crotch, the skis stiffer body just went through the snow unfazed and at the bottom where there is a small compression, it flexed very well and I flowed through. Not all powder skis do this, those with softer tips can flex too much bucking you. Skiing some lower angle pow through small evergreens and undulating terrain was pure joy, the ski's playful side showed though and I was zipping around making quick, abrupt direction changes, riding luge sections between trees, popping off little features. Redirecting the skis in the air was effortless by sucking your legs up and rotating your feet. This is where I think I enjoyed the Wildcat 108's the most. The ski responds to input very well and is smooth in the powder. Float is excellent. You could bury the tips but they never submarined or got bogged down. It handled 2 plus feet without any issues.

DAY 2: I had the skis tuned by EdgeWerks. They totally transformed the Wildcats! I didn't even detune the ski, they skied so perfectly. We woke up to 4-5" of really light powder. A "good enough" day to test the Moment a little more and to see how it would handle more open terrain and modest fresh snow skiing. With the ski now skiing as it should, I loved this ski even more. I started out on the Ridge area again, steeper faces, large bumps and small trees. The ski handles this terrain remarkably well. The Wildcat is a solid ski and I really appreciated the ability to push the tips into the bumps and swales and have it support me well. Its also solid underfoot so I trusted this ski when pushing it. I knew I loved this ski in powder and tight places but what I was truly blown away by how amazing this ski is on open terrain. I popped out of the trees onto "Buddys Run", a blue run with a nice pitch that was a mix of untracked and broken 5". The Wildcat eats this terrain up! Put it on edge and it will blast through tracked snow like it's fresh snow with an uncanny calmness and stability. The Wildcat is easy to ski here. I have never skied so fast with total confidence. The ski remains composed and quiet and releasing the edges in the transition is smooth and confidence inspiring.

DAY 3. I skied the Moment Wildcat 108's in Champagne Powder, knee deep and up to the crotch. The trees were wind loaded and untracked. I have never skied the trees with such ease and total confidence in a ski. I was skiing much faster but with more control through tight aspens. The Ski is so easy to pivot for tight turns and is stable when dropping down in bump-out troughs in the trees. You can charge on the Wildcat and blast through piles and depend on the tips and tails to support you when driving the ski.

For a 108 wide ski, the Wildcat is easy to get on edge and it arc'd far better than I expected. I was very confident carving on the groomers, It arc's smoothly and calmly and even with the heavily rockered tail, theres enough there to support you through the turn. It's quite quick and snappy here and I really had a lot of fun mixing up turn shapes; hitting patch of untracked, then arcing over for a few turns and hitting some pockets of fresh along the edges and then hitting a few powder bumps on my way to the lift. This was not "surviving" like you do on some powder ski's, this was all about fun.

To Summarize, The 184 Wildcat 108 is a really fun, nimble and solid ski that can be skied loose or more traditional in powder. The Wildcats have a nice blend of traits that favor deeper powder but are a blast in 4-5". The Wildcats thrive in playful terrain as well as steep faces and tight trees. It truly lives up to what Moment calls their "Playful Charger". I give this ski my "Best Powder and Tree Ski" award for ticking every box on the list of traits I was looking for. It may not be for everyone, and it will reward those with skills and some power and punish those who get behind the turn, too light or lack the strength to drive this ski. I can understand the excitement and enthusiasm around this ski (and Im sure other Moments) and add myself to the fan club.
w
Attached Pics are my testing groundsw over the 3 days.
I bought some 184's Ron, putting Warden Solomons on them, can't wait.
 

Andy Mink

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I know this isn't an "all Moment" thread but it looks like they're dropping a new deep, steep, powder ski.
 
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