Most Iconic Skiing Photo?

Bad Bob

old n' slow
Skier
Joined
Dec 2, 2015
Posts
3,880
Location
West of CDA South of Canada
The Durance picture is that it is 85 years old and still so relatable. It caught a timeless moment.
He is proving the same physics there we are trying to relearn every year.
Have not seen the old Hans Schneider pic of him jumping off a ridge
 

noobski

Getting on the lift
Skier
Joined
Dec 29, 2020
Posts
186
Location
Midwest
The Alf Alta shot is one of my favorites.

1635442504899.png
 

LiquidFeet

lurking
Instructor
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
5,123
Location
New England
When I moved to New England and started skiing some years back, my local ski shop had an enormous framed print of this iconic New England photo of a race held on Tuckerman Ravine in 1937. They had it hanging over the check-out counter. I'd stare at it as I stood waiting my turn to pay, so it's deeply etched into my memory. More than any other photo it captures for me what makes skiing sublime.

Two years ago it was gone. I couldn't believe they sold it.

"On this day, ski history was being made, and Orne [the photographer] was there. A ski race named in honor of Franklin Edson, who had died a year earlier in a downhill race in Massachusetts, would for the first time feature carefully placed poles at strategic points to force skiers to control their speed: It was the first giant slalom race in America. “Tucks” had already been the scene of a daredevil race named “The Inferno,” and its steep, imposing walls tested even the most skilled skiers of the time."
Spring-Slalom.jpg

Franklin Edson Memorial Race, 1937. Photo by Harold Orne. New England Ski Museum collection.
 
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Muleski

Skiing the powder
Industry Insider
Joined
Nov 14, 2015
Posts
4,754
Location
North of Boston
When I moved to New England and started skiing some years back, my local ski shop had an enormous framed print of this iconic New England photo of a race held on Tuckerman Ravine in 1937. They had it hanging over the check-out counter. I'd stare at it as I stood waiting my turn to pay, so it's deeply etched into my memory. More than any other photo it captures for me what makes skiing sublime.

Two years ago it was gone. I couldn't believe they sold it.

"On this day, ski history was being made, and Orne [the photographer] was there. A ski race named in honor of Franklin Edson, who had died a year earlier in a downhill race in Massachusetts, would for the first time feature carefully placed poles at strategic points to force skiers to control their speed: It was the first giant slalom race in America. “Tucks” had already been the scene of a daredevil race named “The Inferno,” and its steep, imposing walls tested even the most skilled skiers of the time."
Spring-Slalom.jpg

Franklin Edson Memorial Race, 1937. Photo by Harold Orne. New England Ski Museum collection.

My older brother has a copy of that Harold Orne picture in his ski home. Reason being that our dad raced that day. It came from our parents. Absolutely true that it was the first time saplings were inserted in the snow to turn around and control speed. Can remember learning that.

As a kid I was fascinated to hear stories of the early days of ski racing in New
England, when you raced the trail. No gates. Legendary trails. Our dad was pretty solid. WWII Cut his racing short.

It was not unusual to be taken out by breaking a ski. Nor was it unusual for the fastest skiers to PASS the slower{est} ones.

And they also attracted some big crowds. Men in suits with ties, felt hats and long coats. Women in long dresses, warm long coats….often fur. I remember seeing a picture and asking my mom who the couple was. “Your Grandparents, watching Dad race the Thunderbolt on Mt. Greylock.”

What?? Dressed like THAT??? Also 1930’s. Very cool that they brought back the race.

Thanks for posting the pic.
 

Bill Talbot

Vintage Gear Curator
Industry Insider
Joined
Nov 9, 2015
Posts
2,650
Location
New England
My older brother has a copy of that Harold Orne picture in his ski home. Reason being that our dad raced that day. It came from our parents. Absolutely true that it was the first time saplings were inserted in the snow to turn around and control speed. Can remember learning that.

As a kid I was fascinated to hear stories of the early days of ski racing in New
England, when you raced the trail. No gates. Legendary trails. Our dad was pretty solid. WWII Cut his racing short.

It was not unusual to be taken out by breaking a ski. Nor was it unusual for the fastest skiers to PASS the slower{est} ones.

And they also attracted some big crowds. Men in suits with ties, felt hats and long coats. Women in long dresses, warm long coats….often fur. I remember seeing a picture and asking my mom who the couple was. “Your Grandparents, watching Dad race the Thunderbolt on Mt. Greylock.”

What?? Dressed like THAT??? Also 1930’s. Very cool that they brought back the race.

Thanks for posting the pic.
@Muleski

Thunderbolt still lives on (when the conditions allow). This was taken the day before the race in 2010. They were there stomping and putting up gates. The snow was fantastic that year! See also the banner I have hanging in my ski shop.

Thunderbolt on Mt Greylock.JPG


Thunderbolt.JPG
 
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