• For more information on how to avoid pop-up ads and still support SkiTalk click HERE.

mostly wine stuff

JCF

Out on the slopes
Skier
Joined
Mar 12, 2022
Posts
671
Location
ME
It was quite nice. I’m not much for flavor comparisons. It was still fresh, a little young even at 7 years old - Barolo on the lighter end of the scale, which can be a good thing (and not so expensive my sister said). 2017 was good year and this one would be even better if held a bit longer.
I don’t know anything about the estate other than it is one of those Albeisa association wines .

“Albeisa, officially called the Unione Produttori Vini Albesi, is a non-profit organization established in 1973. The association was founded by Renato Ratti and 15 other producers in the Langhe, which covers Barolo, Barbaresco, Roero, Dogliani, and Alba and includes seven DOCGs and seven DOCs.”
 
Last edited:

Mendieta

Master of Snowplow
SkiTalk Tester
Contributor
Joined
Aug 17, 2016
Posts
4,857
Location
SF Bay Area, CA, USA
Thank you, @skibob , for the info on Beaujolais the other day. I found this beautiful Morgon, and it's absolutely gorgeous. It seems like it's worth letting these age a bit - it is great at 4 years. The most complex and intense Gamay I ever had (not like I drink a lot of it). Like a good Barolo, it's light bodied and very flavorful. Complex red fruit flavors, beautiful, fruit forward nose, and a lot of acidity at first and some sweetness first, evolving into a more mature, darker, slightly more bitter taste later. A bit of minerality, too. Definitely interesting, and ever evolving. Mouth watering!

1700627474545.png
 

skibob

Skiing the powder
Skier
Joined
Jan 5, 2016
Posts
4,252
Location
Santa Rosa Fire Belt
Thank you, @skibob , for the info on Beaujolais the other day. I found this beautiful Morgon, and it's absolutely gorgeous. It seems like it's worth letting these age a bit - it is great at 4 years. The most complex and intense Gamay I ever had (not like I drink a lot of it). Like a good Barolo, it's light bodied and very flavorful. Complex red fruit flavors, beautiful, fruit forward nose, and a lot of acidity at first and some sweetness first, evolving into a more mature, darker, slightly more bitter taste later. A bit of minerality, too. Definitely interesting, and ever evolving. Mouth watering!

View attachment 216257
As jmeb suggested, that is a classic. Gamay definitely doesn't age like Barolo or Bordeaux, but it absolutely does age. Morgon is one of the "bigger" styles. 4-10 years for a high quality one like Descombes typically. I love getting people excited about Beaujolais, just be sure to leave me some ;-)
 

jmeb

Enjoys skiing.
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Posts
4,483
Location
Colorado
I love getting people excited about Beaujolais, just be sure to leave me some ;-)

I take solace in knowing my personal influence is so small that as much as blather on about why I drink way more Cru Beaujolais than almost any other one area (maybe $15 CdR...) -- that I ain't moving the price or availability of it.

Still...even when I started paying attention to wine more seriously 7-8 years ago, Gang of Four producers were at least $15 or 20 cheaper.
 

JCF

Out on the slopes
Skier
Joined
Mar 12, 2022
Posts
671
Location
ME
At that tasting where I got those bottles they also had a Morgan.
All were from Nuges, all 2021’s
The Nouveau - Villages - Fleurie - Morgon
There was distinctive step up in character between them and clearly the Morgan was the bigger of them.
But all had a family resemblance that was striking.
A great way to re- discover Beaujolais.
 

locknload

Out on the slopes
Skier
SkiTalk Supporter
Joined
Feb 3, 2016
Posts
1,539
Location
Carlsbad
Nothing amazing in the article but seems to cover all bases ...

Question on this...since Costco is the largest retailer of wine..it can push back on prices with the large distributors.....seems like this still makes Costco a good play? They can only mark up 13.9% and they have really good selection at my Costco in Carlsbad which is the largest seller of alcohol of all the Costcos (yes...we are thirsty here).....
 

pete

not peace but 2 Beers!
Skier
SkiTalk Supporter
Joined
Nov 14, 2015
Posts
2,506
Location
Iowa
Question on this...since Costco is the largest retailer of wine..it can push back on prices with the large distributors.....seems like this still makes Costco a good play? They can only mark up 13.9% and they have really good selection at my Costco in Carlsbad which is the largest seller of alcohol of all the Costcos (yes...we are thirsty here).....
I have no doubt that Costco negotiates what makes them happy, better price but they need not drop their pricing other to draw customers. They I'm sure are fine with higher margins.

Brick and mortar is still a tough market
 

pete

not peace but 2 Beers!
Skier
SkiTalk Supporter
Joined
Nov 14, 2015
Posts
2,506
Location
Iowa
Suspiciously young-looking corks. Have others seen this?

They're is nothing about the wine itself to suggest it's not what's on the label.

How long between the vintage and bottling for cru Beaujolais? A year? Two at very most. Right? So, at least three years in the bottle.

And yet. This cork. I suppose the pale color on the end could be from upright storage in the warehouse. But what about the rest of it? To my eye it looks more like three months than three years.

Thoughts?
View attachment 215803
Fyi

2016 cork from wine direct from the winery, stored in my "cellar".

Cork showing age, cracked

20231123_151540.jpg 20231123_151525.jpg 20231123_151517.jpg
 

pete

not peace but 2 Beers!
Skier
SkiTalk Supporter
Joined
Nov 14, 2015
Posts
2,506
Location
Iowa
Here's a 2013, cork a bit nicer condition.

It's Thanksgiving, so a splurge

20231123_194410.jpg 20231123_194419.jpg
 

cantunamunch

Meh
Skier
Joined
Nov 17, 2015
Posts
21,616
Location
Behavioral sink
Question on this...since Costco is the largest retailer of wine..it can push back on prices with the large distributors.....seems like this still makes Costco a good play? They can only mark up 13.9% and they have really good selection at my Costco in Carlsbad which is the largest seller of alcohol of all the Costcos (yes...we are thirsty here).....

Eh, maybe but then there has to be incentive for them to push back; the easy way for a distributor to circumvent push back is to simply allocate a different product mix to large retailers.

Also, does Costco actually spec the product? Or do they allocate shelf space per distributor and whatever mix is supplied goes, so long as there's price tiers and sales volume?

Also 3-tier hell is mostly an East-of-Mississippi thing. I doubt I can find half the labels you have in any Costco near me.
 

skibob

Skiing the powder
Skier
Joined
Jan 5, 2016
Posts
4,252
Location
Santa Rosa Fire Belt
Eh, maybe but then there has to be incentive for them to push back; the easy way for a distributor to circumvent push back is to simply allocate a different product mix to large retailers.

Also, does Costco actually spec the product? Or do they allocate shelf space per distributor and whatever mix is supplied goes, so long as there's price tiers and sales volume?

Also 3-tier hell is mostly an East-of-Mississippi thing. I doubt I can find half the labels you have in any Costco near me.
Costco's buyers are notoriously well educated and picky. I am sure they "play ball" with the big guys. But they deal with suppliers directly in many cases. Distributors can make a pitch and I am sure they do. But if Costco buyers want a distributor to supply them with Chateau XYZ in [state name] and nobody does, they have a standing arrangement with one or more distributors who will say "yes mam, how many cases and when?"

The funny thing is the one thing they don't seem to throw their weight around on is pricing. Their main competitive edge there remains markup. I guarantee you that quantity matters, but they are not known for playing games or strong arming. Those are the tactics of distributors. No doubt learned from their forebears who converted their illegal prohibition era businesses into "legal" distribution businesses.
 

locknload

Out on the slopes
Skier
SkiTalk Supporter
Joined
Feb 3, 2016
Posts
1,539
Location
Carlsbad
Costco's buyers are notoriously well educated and picky. I am sure they "play ball" with the big guys. But they deal with suppliers directly in many cases. Distributors can make a pitch and I am sure they do. But if Costco buyers want a distributor to supply them with Chateau XYZ in [state name] and nobody does, they have a standing arrangement with one or more distributors who will say "yes mam, how many cases and when?"

The funny thing is the one thing they don't seem to throw their weight around on is pricing. Their main competitive edge there remains markup. I guarantee you that quantity matters, but they are not known for playing games or strong arming. Those are the tactics of distributors. No doubt learned from their forebears who converted their illegal prohibition era businesses into "legal" distribution businesses.
I'm just amazed at how Costco's wine section has evolved over the years. The selection is huge at mine and they have a couple really knowledge people there to help you peruse the selections. They know exactly when some interesting options are coming into the store and just run a really good operation. It feels so boutique compared to the bulk buying that the rest of the Costco experience seems to be. So you are saying, they demand volume discounts from the distributors but otherwise let them set their price knowing that they won't mark up more than the 13.9 %?
 

skibob

Skiing the powder
Skier
Joined
Jan 5, 2016
Posts
4,252
Location
Santa Rosa Fire Belt
I'm just amazed at how Costco's wine section has evolved over the years. The selection is huge at mine and they have a couple really knowledge people there to help you peruse the selections. They know exactly when some interesting options are coming into the store and just run a really good operation. It feels so boutique compared to the bulk buying that the rest of the Costco experience seems to be. So you are saying, they demand volume discounts from the distributors but otherwise let them set their price knowing that they won't mark up more than the 13.9 %?
Yes. Price fixing is illegal. Which doesn't stop it from happening. NY even has a bizarrely complicated legal scheme of setting minimum pricing, but Costco can't even sell wine there anyway.

But, again, if a supplier or distributor tried to tell Costco what they should sell for, they would probably get laughed out of the room. BTW, I have no idea if 13.9% holds for alcohol pricing. But I do know their markups are very modest.

But boutique is hardly the way I look at it. Pretty much everything there is very large volume. You will find some occasional local gems, especially in Northern California. But the vast majority of what is available there is mass produced. Which doesn't mean it is bad necessarily. Most of what I call "boutique" producers just aren't big enough to get a call back from a Costco buyer.

EDIT: I want to emphasize that Costco is mostly dealing with suppliers rather than distributors. Obviously the distributor, due to our stupid and corrupt laws around "states' rights" has to make it happen. And many, many shops are at the mercy of distributors. But they just can't tell costco what to do. If you want to move thousands of cases, even tens of thousands of cases per state, the distributor isn't going to hold you hostage. There is someone else ready to play. Even in the states with few large distributors. Many of the big states have "self-serve" distributors who are merely paper pushers and shipping facilitators. They are terrible, horrible, stupid laws which limit your power as a consumer and should be completely and finally discarded once and for all.
 

Sponsor

Staff online

Top