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mostly wine stuff

mdf

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After the pour? Or corked on its side?
After the pour. The glass goes in if it's stemless, or warm it in a water glass and then transfer.
If it's a partial glass, I'll do 5 seconds and check the temperature, then add 3 more if needed.
 

skibob

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Open bottle preservation!

Ok, I almost started a thread on this because this post will get lost in a long thread. But this is a ski site in the end, so I'll post here.

After trying different vacuum systems, I settled for re-corking my (red) wines for preservation. My typical use case is drinking a bottle over three days. Once I open it, it moves from the wine fridge to the groceries fridge, so oxidation and other processes slow down. For many years I used inert gas as well, to insulate the top layer of wine inside the bottle. However, at some point I realize that I always give plenty of air to my wines to open up, even in day 3.

So, I started corking it without any addition of inert gas, and putting it back in the fridge (at 5C) until the next evening. I have observed no negative effects, at all! If anything, it feels like the wine is going through slow pace decanting with the little oxygen inside the bottle, and at very low temps. So, it kind of evolves in a good way.

Of course, if I planned to keep the wine for a week or longer, I would use the inert gas. But even then, I wonder whether the ratio of oxygen to wine in a bottle either 2/3 or 1/3 full would ever ruin a wine, if tightly corked. Mmm ... I might need to run that experiment!

Thoughts, my dearest wine geeks?
This is exactly what I do and came to it by pretty much the exact same route.

I definitely would use inert gas if planning on keeping it for more than 3 days.

As for bringing it back to temperature, I generally only have a bottle two nights max. I'll try to remember to get it out of the fridge. But, otherwise I just use my hands on the glass to warm it up, which is suprisingly effective. I have used a water bath if I am serving it to others.
 

mdf

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I used to put the bottle under a trickle of hot water, but it is too easy to accidentally get it too warm. The sudden transition from "nothing's happening" to "oops, too much."
 

skibob

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I used to put the bottle under a trickle of hot water, but it is too easy to accidentally get it too warm. The sudden transition from "nothing's happening" to "oops, too much."
Yeah, that is why I prefer a water bath. Usually ambient tap temperature is about "cellar" temperature for me. It is usually still a little cool, but not COLD.

I'll even do it with whites, just not as long. I don't like ice cold white wine and I HATE hot red wine. I'll stop going to a restaurant that serves wine too hot.
 

mdf

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my hands on the glass to warm it up
I often have to do that in a restaurant. (While we are on the subject of restaurants, a had to send the wine glasses back at a fancy restaurant again over the weekend.)
water bath
What do you use for the container? A big pot? I'm thinking ahead to ski trips where improvising in the rental kitchen is often required.
 

skibob

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I often have to do that in a restaurant. (While we are on the subject of restaurants, a had to send the wine glasses back at a fancy restaurant again over the weekend.)

What do you use for the container? A big pot? I'm thinking ahead to ski trips where improvising in the rental kitchen is often required.
Yes, I've used a stock pot for exactly that situation. Or a flower vase if there is one big enough
 

Mendieta

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. I'll stop going to a restaurant that serves wine too hot.

I pretty much stopped ordering wine at restaurants (let alone bars) for the same reason. A beer is typically just fine, less expensive and less stressful. Restaurants that serve wine at the right temperature price food at the wrong price around here :roflmao:
 

locknload

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The easiest answer to this problem is to never NOT finish the bottle in a sitting.... :roflmao: I actually do appreciate some of the tactics presented for that rare occasion when the bottle doesn't get drank.
 

Jilly

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I often have to do that in a restaurant. (While we are on the subject of restaurants, a had to send the wine glasses back at a fancy restaurant again over the weekend.)

What do you use for the container? A big pot? I'm thinking ahead to ski trips where improvising in the rental kitchen is often required.

Nothing like a little chlorine with your red!!
 

JCF

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Had this beauty last night. It was excellent. I find the flavor comparisons too subjective though I do get that it is a useful way to describe a wine. I just haven’t developed the official, trained sensitivity.
I tend to the bulkier terms, like bad, good, very good, excellent, sweet, dry, delicious, balanced, etc.
This one was deliciously balanced. And a bit more expensive than my usual choices but it was an another Thanksgiving gathering.
No chance this bottle would not be emptied. IMG_7784.jpeg
 

cantunamunch

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In the direct-import-does-not-mean-good I present IMG_20231126_192339.jpg

barely pizza or ski-tuning grade: fruit, sour, tannic. You couldn't tell it was a Ribera del Duero at all.

The rest of the chat was spent over an 1865 Carmenere, a much better bottle.
 
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Tony S

Tony S

I have a confusion to make ...
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Had this beauty last night. It was excellent. I find the flavor comparisons too subjective though I do get that it is a useful way to describe a wine. I just haven’t developed the official, trained sensitivity.
I tend to the bulkier terms, like bad, good, very good, excellent, sweet, dry, delicious, balanced, etc.
This one was deliciously balanced. And a bit more expensive than my usual choices but it was an another Thanksgiving gathering.
No chance this bottle would not be emptied. View attachment 216880
I had no idea what this was. Had to Google. So I guess this is basically the Barbera version of what they have done with Dolcetto, no? Piemonte Dolcetto is now "Dogliano" and Barbera is now "Nizza." Do I have that right?
 

JCF

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I'd never seen it before. It was recommended to me by the merchant.
Damn fine wine (the 2014) especially considering that that was the first year of production.
I read the best barbera come from Nizza Monferrato and is referred to as the "filet mignon of barbera.
At 10 years old it was perfectly balanced and juicy. I'd be curious to try a younger one and maybe get another bottle of that Bava to try in a couple years - but I doubt I would be able to resist drinking it for very long.
 

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