New skis for my wife - strong intermediate

charlier

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After reading 14 pages of comments on rocketed skis beginners and watching a few Deb Armstrong reviews, my wife suggested that she try new skis. She is 5’ 7 1/2” and weighs 135 lbs and is a strong athletic intermediate skier. She has Atomic Hawx Ultra 95 boots that were professionally fit. Currently, her daily all mountain skis is a Sheeva 9 or Ripstick 94 skis + powder skis. She has taken clinics, but skis >90mm are not helpful. After years of working on technique, she is on a plateau. She is interested in getting new skis and learn how to get on edge, and get more comfortable on bumps. We live in Rossland, B.C. and ski at Red Mountain. Suggestions for women’s skis focused on soft to figroomers that help her get on edge and move forward on her technique. Happy Thanksgiving to all. ❄️❄️❄️
 
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Tricia

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Hi @charlier
Fortunately for her there are some incredible options.
Obviously there are many main stream options but I would be remiss if I didn’t suggest @Premier Skis Blossom AM77

Other great choices include Head Powerjoy,

I’m on my mobile right now but will get back in here when I get back on my laptop
:popcorn:
 
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charlier

charlier

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Hi @charlier
Fortunately for her there are some incredible options.
Obviously there are many main stream options but I would be remiss if I didn’t suggest @Premier Skis Blossom AM77

Other great choices include Head Powerjoy,

I’m on my mobile right now but will get back in here when I get back on my laptop
:popcorn:
Thanks for the suggestions and I will try to eliminate my biased views. My first but not fully developed thoughts were Head V Shape 10, but the Head Powerjoy is a great suggestion. Are there appropriate skis from Fisher or Elan. Blossom Ski were not on my radar - I mostly ski tour in Canada or spring-summer in the Cascades, WA. Suggestions from women for my wife is super helpful.
 
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DanoT

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When I worked at an on mountain demo centre a couple of seasons ago, the Head Total Joy was by far our most popular women's ski. I think it is due to the ski being suitable for a wide range of abilities and experience from intermediate to advanced skiers. At 85mm wide under foot it was also capable in a variety of conditions and terrain.

I once put both a father and daughter on Head Total Joy skis, explaining that dad in his 70s and daughter in her 50s were both roughly the same size and ability and with the overall popularity of the Total Joy, I was confident that both would be comfortable on that ski....and they were.
 
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charlier

charlier

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When I worked at an on mountain demo centre a couple of seasons ago, the Head Total Joy was by far our most popular women's ski. I think it is due to the ski being suitable for a wide range of abilities and experience from intermediate to advanced skiers. At 85mm wide under foot it was also capable in a variety of conditions and terrain.

I once put both a father and daughter on Head Total Joy skis, explaining that dad in his 70s and daughter in her 50s were both roughly the same size and ability and with the overall popularity of the Total Joy, I was confident that both would be comfortable on that ski....and they were.
Surprised that @Tony S did not suggest skis, only some heckling. Thanks to @DanoT regarding Total Joy skis - I assume that a good skier can really rip on these ski on soft and super firm groomers.
My other ill-informed ideas were Fisher RC (based on Deb Armstrong’s video) or Elan Wildcat - these ski might be more of an “all mountain” ski, given what she is looking for. Or perhaps an appropriate woman’s non-race SL ski. Waiting for Tricia”s and other women’s comments.
 
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charlier

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If she’s a strong, athletic skier looking really to advance her technique get her on proper carving skis. A 155 slalom ski would be perfect. She isn’t looking for an “everywhere” ski - she’s looking to get better. Don’t bugger around with “all-mountain” junk.
It’s a ski that I thought about, but a real SL ski has a very small sweet spot. SL ski’s do not tolerate lapses in technique.
 

Mendieta

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It’s a ski that I thought about, but a real SL ski has a very small sweet spot. SL ski’s do not tolerate lapses in technique.
Yes, I would look for a civilian carver, i am sure @Tricia can recommend a few more (the ski selector here at Ski Talk can help you get a short list and then run it by others).

 
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HardDaysNight

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It’s a ski that I thought about, but a real SL ski has a very small sweet spot. SL ski’s do not tolerate lapses in technique.
The expression “small sweet spot” merely means that the performance of the ski is sensitive to fore-aft positioning. That’s a good thing if one is genuinely interested in improvement. Similarly, the feedback provided by the ski when technique lapses is actually important to making such lapses less frequent and less extreme. How else is one going to learn? It’s the absence of such feedback that allows hapless intermediates to spend many years slithering around without making any discernible progress. Don’t waste her time!
 
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charlier

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The expression “small sweet spot” merely means that the performance of the ski is sensitive to fore-aft positioning. That’s a good thing if one is genuinely interested in improvement. Similarly, the feedback provided by the ski when technique lapses is actually important to making such lapses less frequent and less extreme. How else is one going to learn? It’s the absence of such feedback that allows hapless intermediates to spend many years slithering around without making any discernible progress. Don’t waste her time!
Excellent post. Clearly, getting on edge needs to be combined with her for-aft positioning. Perhaps, we might consider a non-race SL ski or other carving skis. FYI, I am not going to coach her or make any suggestions regarding her on-piste technique, unless we are off-piste on wide skis.
 

DanoT

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FYI, I am not going to coach her or make any suggestions regarding her on-piste technique, unless we are off-piste on wide skis.
The above sounds like a good idea and reminds me of a sign that they have at Lake Louise: I am paraphrasing but basically it says that it is less costly to hire a ski instructor vs teaching a significant other and then having to pay divorce lawyer fees. :ogbiggrin:
 

Tony S

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If she’s a strong, athletic skier looking really to advance her technique get her on proper carving skis. A 155 slalom ski would be perfect. She isn’t looking for an “everywhere” ski - she’s looking to get better. Don’t bugger around with “all-mountain” junk.

The expression “small sweet spot” merely means that the performance of the ski is sensitive to fore-aft positioning. That’s a good thing if one is genuinely interested in improvement. Similarly, the feedback provided by the ski when technique lapses is actually important to making such lapses less frequent and less extreme. How else is one going to learn? It’s the absence of such feedback that allows hapless intermediates to spend many years slithering around without making any discernible progress. Don’t waste her time!

I wish that for once HDN would tell us how he really feels.
 

Tony S

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Surprised that @Tony S did not suggest skis, only some heckling.
Yeah. Sorry about that. Had to get the important stuff out there first before going back to the stove.

Are there appropriate skis from Fisher or Elan.
Sure. A Wildcat Black or Wingman 82 CTi in about a 166 would be good if she doesn't want to do the SL route (which would definitely be good, as others have pointed out). Fischer RCOne GT 82 in the same length - nice ski. These all fall into the "piste-oriented all-mountain ski" category, not the "technical trainer" category.

Obviously there are many main stream options but I would be remiss if I didn’t suggest @Premier Skis Blossom AM77
This would be even better than the above for the described goal, and a notch this side of a race ski in terms of ease of use. 164cm. I don't know of anyone who has skied this ski and not liked it a whole lot.

For what little it's worth I have never liked any of the Head Joys I've been on. (Ducks rotten tomatoes.) HMMV. She doesn't need a "women's" ski necessarily. She's not tiny. I'd go for the Rally if I were going with Head.

ANY ski to be used for technical development like this needs to have a first-class tune on it. Just saying.
 

ADKmel

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I'll suggest if $$ no object the Stockli laser CX-(69) is super carver- the Laser SC (72) felt stiffer to me and there is a ladies lazer MX (67 under foot) the demo was a 158cm too short (my skis are mostly 165) Stockli's are all very nice carvers and smoooth rides and forgiving. Since she likes the 'blizzard feel', the Blizzard Phoenix R14Pro= (69) under foot was not super aggressive and would be great for learning, I gave it +++ in my demo notes I was on a 160cm they felt short. The Atomic Cloud series for ladies are very good carvers too. The higher the # the smaller the sweet spot. I sold my Atomic 11's and now currently loving my Liberty 76w's they are super carvers. I wasn't disappointed when I went from Stockli's back to my Liberty's on demo day. So Many great skis, I hope she has fun demoing!
 
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charlier

charlier

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Yeah. Sorry about that. Had to get the important stuff out there first before going back to the stove.


Sure. A Wildcat Black or Wingman 82 CTi in about a 166 would be good if she doesn't want to do the SL route (which would definitely be good, as others have pointed out). Fischer RCOne GT 82 in the same length - nice ski. These all fall into the "piste-oriented all-mountain ski" category, not the "technical trainer" category.


This would be even better than the above for the described goal, and a notch this side of a race ski in terms of ease of use. 164cm. I don't know of anyone who has skied this ski and not liked it a whole lot.

For what little it's worth I have never liked any of the Head Joys I've been on. (Ducks rotten tomatoes.) HMMV. She doesn't need a "women's" ski necessarily. She's not tiny. I'd go for the Rally if I were going with Head.

ANY ski to be used for technical development like this needs to have a first-class tune on it. Just saying.
Thanks for the suggestions. Head, Fisher, et al., are super easy skis for me to purchase.
 

Jilly

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SL skis, now we're talking my language.

Atomic Cloud series
Rossi Hero MT
Rossi Hero SL Ti or I think I saw Ca was back.
Rossi Nova 10 or 14
Dynastar E lite series
Blizzard Phoenix R 14

I don't know much about Head skis I'm afraid. Do they still make the Elite Joy, I think it was called. It was a slalom skis.
 

Viking9

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I don’t agree with HDN , I get it but your slighting the ski companies abilities to make a strong all mountain front side ripper.
A professional skier can make solid slalom turns on an All Mountain ski and so can an intermediate skier.
A hard snow biased all mountain is a pretty solid ski ,,,no ??
 

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