Now that you're retired...

SpikeDog

You want Big Air, kid?
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Resurrecting this thread.



I was never a super strong skier, but it's possible there has been a slight uptick since retirement. This is basically because of more slope time, but also skiing in the Rockies instead of the Mid-A tends to force you to raise your game or fall by the wayside.
O:)
I would disagree with that statement, Jim. You may have gotten better in the last few years, but it was from a solid base.

I look at my post from last December, and have to laugh at what's gone down since then. Made it to Maui, even though the state of Hawaii made it very difficult travelwise. Retired in July. Did lots more camping, even if the motorhome's engine is quite unreliable. My golf game got better, and I broke 80 for the first time. Sold the lot in Star Valley Ranch, WY for what I consider a great price; we'll see in hindsight whether this October was the top of the market there. And after 3 months of retirement it still seems like it was a good idea. And I have an IKON and Epic pass to burn this winter.

So far the hardest part has been adjusting eating patterns. I used to get up at 5 AM, and had breakfast, lunch, and dinner at roughly the same times. Now I get up at 8 or 9 AM, have breakfast, and then the next meal is . . . whenever. Only 2 meals a day about half the time.
 
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fatbob

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I thought I'd got the makings of a plan together during the Covid window with plenty of time to research and do spreadsheets and a vague target. Now huge inflation is making me wonder - all sorts of stuff skyrocketing but will investments keep pace? Essentially inflation usually ends up stealing from savers and everyone else stands still or benefits from having mortgage debt eroded.
 

Andy Mink

Airborne Andy
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Retirement is still going well. This past season I picked up Steamboat and Mt. Bachelor, plus some DV and Solitude time along with the regular, local places. Ann and I are looking forward to the Aspen gathering and checking off yet another new-to-me area.

Along the way I sucked into the mountain bike scene (again, thank you @Philpug and @Tricia). I am doing my best to stay away from golf but would like to get back into waterfowl hunting after several years off.

Reno really is a great jumping off point for so much. At least 15 ski areas within reasonable distance, great mountain biking right out my back door plus much more with a short drive, world class fishing at Tahoe and Pyramid, river and stream fishing all over the place, lots of golf, easy access to San Francisco/Sacramento if that's your thing, easy access to the wine country (YAY!), great local breweries, and almost unlimited camping/glamping within hours. Retirement certainly does make those things easier to access.
 

SSSdave

life is short precious ...don't waste it
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Enjoyed re-reading posts. Since the thread has run its course, I'll add something else that ought to resonate with our more gregarious single members living alone.

What one will read in media and senior forums is that many of us after retiring can end up rather alone more than is healthy. Many of us like this person have spent decades working in career environments with lots of other people we daily communicated with. Upon retirement or loss of significant others, that creates a vacuum, so not easily filled that one sometimes reads of people UN-retiring after getting tired of just watching the boob tube endlessly and other typical pursuits to fill that void. Of course, the minority of wealthy seniors can travel with a broader selection of activities.

Thus on forums one reads how many choose to engage in community services or church groups, take classes, join hobby and craft groups, visit senior centers, hiking groups, and a list of other activities. Also many people by retirement age have declined physically to the level they cannot entertain many outdoor sports and outdoor activities. Additionally in this Internet era, traditional ways seniors remained active in previous generations have evaporated leaving just online socializing that will always leave much to be desired. Humans over millennium lived in extended families within small communities where elders always had significant rolls helping raise and watch after children and run their villages. But that is all long gone.

Something I greatly value as a skier is casually socializing on lift rides. There are few other activities in life where one can interact with other nearby people from A to Z in life at all ages. Nicely, many people on ski days are enthusiastically enjoying themselves, thus more apt to be in good moods enjoying conversation. And am not suggesting most strangers riding lifts one may meet on lifts are eager to make conversation. I ride quietly plenty. But enough are in relaxed ways without being pushy, that a single person can fill that void in ways few other activities can. At one extreme, groups of kids riding quad lifts are often chatty between themselves. Not seeming to pay attention, I might listen awhile and at some point blurt out something I see below on a slope to make them all laugh. And then there are the many foreigners that quietly chat amongst themselves in whatever foreign language, that welcome actually conversing a bit with locals if given a chance. And much more of course.
 

Marker

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I saw this thread last year just before I retired at the end of 2020. I can now report that my skiing increased to 52 days from my normal 25 even with the pandemic. We didn't really start skiing until MLK Monday due to travel restrictions and finishing up work projects to hand off to the new guy. We stayed until the end of March and then made one last trip in April for true spring skiing, something I just haven't had the time for during working days. I hope to get more days this year, although there will be other distractions (daughter's wedding in late March). I will finally have enough time to attend the Taos Ski Week Mini-Gathering, which as a Texan displaced to Pennsylvania has always been attractive. Like someone said "You'll be another year older if you wait". I think I got that quote right. While I would like to relocate to ski country and my wife loves skiing as well, she sets other life matters equally or higher, so I don't see leaving the PA/DE border and Killington as my "home" mountain for some time.

I have been filling my days with more travel, gym work-outs, getting caught up on projects at home and our condo, serving as president of our church council, reading, cooking, and such. My wife convinced me to restart dance lessons to prepare for the wedding. I think these might help with footwork during skiing.
 
Thread Starter
TS
Jim Kenney

Jim Kenney

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Spikedog, I hear you on the change in meals and sleeping habits. I tend to gain weight in the off season and lose weight during ski season.
Fatbob are you one of those who involuntarily saved a nice sum for retirement when travel got shut down during the pandemic?
SSSDave, last winter I was still in social distance mode with wife at son's home in SLC. But I rode chairlifts all winter with strangers wearing a mask. Those chairlift rides were my primary socialization with the outside world and many discussions were fascinating. Those who could work remotely (many under age 50) were having the time of their lives, others were suffering through unemployment, still others (generally older folks) fearful of the continued threat of covid. Getting my doses of vax in Feb and Mar was a great relief.
Andy and Marker, you guys sound like you have the retirement thing all figured out:golfclap:
 

Jwrags

Aka pwdrhnd
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It is so appropriate that this thread popped up today. I am on the verge of retirement, at the end of the year. It is somewhat bittersweet but I fell like it is the right time. I have been a doctor(surgeon) for over 30 years, 40 if you want to count medical school and residency. I have enjoyed the work and loved the camaraderie in the OR during surgery. There are few things more gratifying than being able to "fix" someone. I have worked part time for the past 5 years so it has been a nice transition. I could probably keep doing what I am doing for a lot longer but at some point I need to stop. I notified my colleagues last December I was going to retire at the end of 2021 so they had a year to figure out how to live without me. Over the past several years people I know who are my age or younger have dropped dead or developed serious medical issues so that confirms my decision. My wife has some medical issues so if we are going to enjoy retirement it needs to start now. It will be a sad day to walk out of the OR the last time but I know it is the right decision.

So, what are plans in retirement. Lots of travel. Time to check or bucket list items. While not planned yet, there is skiing in the alps, a trip to Greece, Africa safari (photo), visiting China, Australia, the Galapagos, and who knows where else. Unfortunately, my wife does not ski but she is pretty accommodating. At the end of January I am planning a road trip, starting at Bachelor, then stopping in Sun Valley on our way to Jackson Hole to visit our son who will be there for the winter. Since I have both Ikon and Epic passes this year I have some flexibility.

It will be an interesting new stage of life.
 

Uncle-A

In the words of Paul Simon "You can call me Al"
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It is so appropriate that this thread popped up today. I am on the verge of retirement, at the end of the year. It is somewhat bittersweet but I fell like it is the right time. I have been a doctor(surgeon) for over 30 years, 40 if you want to count medical school and residency. I have enjoyed the work and loved the camaraderie in the OR during surgery. There are few things more gratifying than being able to "fix" someone. I have worked part time for the past 5 years so it has been a nice transition. I could probably keep doing what I am doing for a lot longer but at some point I need to stop. I notified my colleagues last December I was going to retire at the end of 2021 so they had a year to figure out how to live without me. Over the past several years people I know who are my age or younger have dropped dead or developed serious medical issues so that confirms my decision. My wife has some medical issues so if we are going to enjoy retirement it needs to start now. It will be a sad day to walk out of the OR the last time but I know it is the right decision.

So, what are plans in retirement. Lots of travel. Time to check or bucket list items. While not planned yet, there is skiing in the alps, a trip to Greece, Africa safari (photo), visiting China, Australia, the Galapagos, and who knows where else. Unfortunately, my wife does not ski but she is pretty accommodating. At the end of January I am planning a road trip, starting at Bachelor, then stopping in Sun Valley on our way to Jackson Hole to visit our son who will be there for the winter. Since I have both Ikon and Epic passes this year I have some flexibility.

It will be an interesting new stage of life.
Sounds like you have good plans for travel, Greece should be wonderful, Photo Safari make sure you get ALL your shots, and be careful what you eat in China, my sister got sick from the food on her visit to China. If you like to go on a cruise, the Panama Canal trip was interesting we went west to east but either way would be a good trip. Congratulations on the retirement and enjoy your future life.
 

Marker

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Spikedog, I hear you on the change in meals and sleeping habits. I tend to gain weight in the off season and lose weight during ski season.
Fatbob are you one of those who involuntarily saved a nice sum for retirement when travel got shut down during the pandemic?
SSSDave, last winter I was still in social distance mode with wife at son's home in SLC. But I rode chairlifts all winter with strangers wearing a mask. Those chairlift rides were my primary socialization with the outside world and many discussions were fascinating. Those who could work remotely (many under age 50) were having the time of their lives, others were suffering through unemployment, still others (generally older folks) fearful of the continued threat of covid. Getting my doses of vax in Feb and Mar was a great relief.
Andy and Marker, you guys sound like you have the retirement thing all figured out:golfclap:
From my March trip to Killington until the end of the year, I was easily working from home, but it depended on my associates working in the labs. Some were glad to get back while others were very hesitant. I had my plans in place to retire, but my management could have made that decision more difficult as we commercialized my last product. As it was I went out on a high note.
 

Bill Miles

Old Man Groomer Zoomer
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It is so appropriate that this thread popped up today. I am on the verge of retirement, at the end of the year. It is somewhat bittersweet but I fell like it is the right time. I have been a doctor(surgeon) for over 30 years, 40 if you want to count medical school and residency. I have enjoyed the work and loved the camaraderie in the OR during surgery. There are few things more gratifying than being able to "fix" someone. I have worked part time for the past 5 years so it has been a nice transition. I could probably keep doing what I am doing for a lot longer but at some point I need to stop. I notified my colleagues last December I was going to retire at the end of 2021 so they had a year to figure out how to live without me. Over the past several years people I know who are my age or younger have dropped dead or developed serious medical issues so that confirms my decision. My wife has some medical issues so if we are going to enjoy retirement it needs to start now. It will be a sad day to walk out of the OR the last time but I know it is the right decision.

So, what are plans in retirement. Lots of travel. Time to check or bucket list items. While not planned yet, there is skiing in the alps, a trip to Greece, Africa safari (photo), visiting China, Australia, the Galapagos, and who knows where else. Unfortunately, my wife does not ski but she is pretty accommodating. At the end of January I am planning a road trip, starting at Bachelor, then stopping in Sun Valley on our way to Jackson Hole to visit our son who will be there for the winter. Since I have both Ikon and Epic passes this year I have some flexibility.

It will be an interesting new stage of life.
Same thing with me either right before or right after I took early retirement in 2002. Just reinforced my decision. No sense working until you keel over dead unless you have to.
 

scott43

Skiing the powder
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It is so appropriate that this thread popped up today. I am on the verge of retirement, at the end of the year. It is somewhat bittersweet but I fell like it is the right time. I have been a doctor(surgeon) for over 30 years, 40 if you want to count medical school and residency. I have enjoyed the work and loved the camaraderie in the OR during surgery. There are few things more gratifying than being able to "fix" someone. I have worked part time for the past 5 years so it has been a nice transition. I could probably keep doing what I am doing for a lot longer but at some point I need to stop. I notified my colleagues last December I was going to retire at the end of 2021 so they had a year to figure out how to live without me. Over the past several years people I know who are my age or younger have dropped dead or developed serious medical issues so that confirms my decision. My wife has some medical issues so if we are going to enjoy retirement it needs to start now. It will be a sad day to walk out of the OR the last time but I know it is the right decision.

So, what are plans in retirement. Lots of travel. Time to check or bucket list items. While not planned yet, there is skiing in the alps, a trip to Greece, Africa safari (photo), visiting China, Australia, the Galapagos, and who knows where else. Unfortunately, my wife does not ski but she is pretty accommodating. At the end of January I am planning a road trip, starting at Bachelor, then stopping in Sun Valley on our way to Jackson Hole to visit our son who will be there for the winter. Since I have both Ikon and Epic passes this year I have some flexibility.

It will be an interesting new stage of life.
And most importantly, you got a plan. :golfclap:
 

ZionPow

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Wahsnatch
I had always planned to retire from the defense industry when I turned 60. I knew that I needed something to do and to be part of a team once I retired. While I was still working in the defense industry I earned my medical certification and became a volunteer ski patroller in Utah. A few years before I turned 60 the resort I was working for offered me a full-time paid patrol position for the following season. I decided to take that position even though I was still working in the defense industry and I negotiated seven months working for the defense industry and five months working on the mountain. When I turned 60 I retired from the defense industry and now work five months a year on the mountain. I have earned an ATF blaster certification and I am a lead avalanche gunner and hand route leader at the resort. I completed the National Avalanche School Pro avalanche certification courses. I am a student of the science of snow and what makes avalanches happen. I’ve completed many medical conferences and training to enhance my medical skills. I work close to 100 days every season on the mountain and I enjoy it very much. I hope to be doing it for a long time. During the off-season I travel and put way too many miles on my mountain bike and spend a lot of time outdoors with family. I like to say that I am seasonally retired.
 

pais alto

me encanta el país alto
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Might as well throw in here. I retired from the wildfire game on my 54th birthday, then started working in an outdoor gear/ski shop and on the local patrol. REI put the mom-and-pop store under, but I was getting over 100 days/year skiing until I retired from patrolling.

Now I get old-f#&k passes at two nearby hills (Taos & Santa Fe) and it seems I’ll pretty much only ski on good mid-week days and in the backcountry. Life is too short to ski with crowds or on hardpack.

When people ask me what I do, I say “whatever I want.”

Andrew McLean once told me, “Day jobs suck.“ There have been some setbacks, but I have to say that things could be worse for me.
 
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