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Uncle-A

In the words of Paul Simon "You can call me Al"
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When it comes to chainsaws, and other yard tools I prefer electric. because I rarely have more than 15-20 minutes of work from a chainsaw, string trimmer, etc. per month. A gallon of pre mixed gas would go bad long before I use it all.
Agreed, all my lawn tools have been electric, including my chainsaw. For years I even had an electric lawnmower before going back to gasoline powered for the last 5 years. Now my 55 and over community cuts the lawn and edges the sidewalk, the bushes close to the house are my responsibility and I use my electric hedge trimmer. It is the easiest way to get the job done and less maintenance on the tools, all you need is a good 100 ft. outdoor electric cord.
 

Uncle-A

In the words of Paul Simon "You can call me Al"
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you appear to have missed this part:





Those are so cheap and ubiquitous that trucks and SUVs often come with them standard now. In other words, I don't need to go buy one; there's one built into the back of the Jeep.



*shrug* they also have to be sharpened, that hasn't gotten easier.
I didn't miss the point and yes some vehicles come with an electric outlet including my own jeep, but the vehicle has to be reasonably new and running. BTW sharpening my chainsaw is not any different than sharpening my friends gas one, he uses the same hand file I use and mine is lighter in weight and doesn't spill any gas when doing it.
 

cantunamunch

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I didn't miss the point and yes some vehicles come with an electric outlet including my own jeep, but the vehicle has to be reasonably new

Or, one can blow $40 at a DIY box store/Auto parts store...

and running.


BTW sharpening my chainsaw is not any different than sharpening my friends gas one, he uses the same hand file I use and mine is lighter in weight and doesn't spill any gas when doing it.

I know. That's my point. Charging a cordless chainsaw is as little or less fuss than sharpening it.
 

Uncle-A

In the words of Paul Simon "You can call me Al"
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I know. That's my point. Charging a cordless chainsaw is as little or less fuss than sharpening it.
You missed my point, charging is not the type of maintenance I was referring. Charging is the powering of the tool and you still need a plug but there is extra steps of removing the battery from the tool and placing it in the charger, plugging the charger in is the same as plugging the tool in. Maintenance on a gas tool is much more detailed especially at the end of the season, draining the fuel, winterizing the tool etc.. With the electric lawnmower I only had to install new brushes in the motor once after about 10 years.
 

crgildart

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Agreed, all my lawn tools have been electric, including my chainsaw. For years I even had an electric lawnmower before going back to gasoline powered for the last 5 years. Now my 55 and over community cuts the lawn and edges the sidewalk, the bushes close to the house are my responsibility and I use my electric hedge trimmer. It is the easiest way to get the job done and less maintenance on the tools, all you need is a good 100 ft. outdoor electric cord.
This is the third multi day power outage in as many years here.. One lasted 10 days. Would need a LOT of batteries go have gotten to this point.. along with others. Of course I was just gonna wait and get to it when the power comes back.. Or, run a cord from the generator if 2-3 quick cuts were urgently needed..

The BEST tools are the ones someone else uses and doesn't charge me for.. I did bring them some cold water though.. Have to save my cash to pay for more propane.. They might be running a shoe box operation while their power and internet are down..

1692282721418.png
 

David Chaus

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FWLIW all my outdoor power toys are electric, using the same battery system. Chain saw, pole chain saw, string trimmer hedge trimmer, and my non-riding lawnmower (though they now make a battery powered riding mower). I still have a gas John Deere riding mower/tractor.

Oh wait, my wood chipper is gas as well. My point was my chain saws work great, don’t sit around idling using up gas, so the batteries actually as long or longer than my old gas chain saw. Also no oil changes, though still refilling bar chain oil reservoir, along with normal maintenance like sharpening chain and replacing chain and bar every so often.

I use this stuff quite a bit, living on 10 acres with a gardener-aholic.
 

wiread

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I'm a big fan of electric handheld tools. Blower, trimmers, Edger and chainsaw. Of course I can't have one battery platform LOL. But yes, my battery saw failed me after a storm. Not because of power, but a simple washer popped off and the retaining ring that kept the chain on the drive gear and our local ACE was closed because of no power so no new little $*%^(# ring available for me to purchase and keep going. Otherwise I can cut a full pick up load of wood with 1 battery. Very impressed.
 

pete

not peace but 2 Beers!
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They are pretty decent nowadays.

E.g. Makita XCU04PT. View attachment 209395

I highly recommend the Makita as an option, but Stile did release a nice tool and hear it's a good compliment to their fuel versions.

There's some good youtube reviews, "Projectfarm" has a nice one. I have the XCU03 and only differs from the 04 with the 14 inch bar verses 16inch. I'll get ~40 min of use and have cut plenty of wood with it buying spare blade and bar. Read going with a wider blade .05 verse .035 actually cuts better but I haven't tried this.

Home Depot has regular specials with 4 batteries, use their 10% off to stack savings.

This and their little LTX 10" version and I am comfy doing most any tree and clean up that my 16" gas chainsaw can do. Trick seems to be chain speed it near same as the gas versions.

I taut the electric as you just grab and go, i keep batteries charged up and since I have other Makita hand tools, it made sense to pick up.


When it comes to chainsaws, and other yard tools I prefer electric. because I rarely have more than 15-20 minutes of work from a chainsaw, string trimmer, etc. per month. A gallon of pre mixed gas would go bad long before I use it all.
I really love electric tools as having mix fuel to me while easy is one thing I just don't care about. But I will say, I've had good luck with old old fuel that has ran just fine after 2yrs .. I was going to mix with newer stuff, but got lazy.
 

neonorchid

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I highly recommend the Makita as an option, but Stile did release a nice tool and hear it's a good compliment to their fuel versions.

There's some good youtube reviews, "Projectfarm" has a nice one. I have the XCU03 and only differs from the 04 with the 14 inch bar verses 16inch. I'll get ~40 min of use and have cut plenty of wood with it buying spare blade and bar. Read going with a wider blade .05 verse .035 actually cuts better but I haven't tried this.

Home Depot has regular specials with 4 batteries, use their 10% off to stack savings.

This and their little LTX 10" version and I am comfy doing most any tree and clean up that my 16" gas chainsaw can do. Trick seems to be chain speed it near same as the gas versions.

I taut the electric as you just grab and go, i keep batteries charged up and since I have other Makita hand tools, it made sense to pick up.



I really love electric tools as having mix fuel to me while easy is one thing I just don't care about. But I will say, I've had good luck with old old fuel that has ran just fine after 2yrs .. I was going to mix with newer stuff, but got lazy.
I have a pin oak with lots of dead branches and dead ends that look like the suckers took over the lower to mid section of the branch.
It's not just my pin oak. Someone in the neighborhood told me she had an arborist look at her two pin oaks in not quite as bad shape but similar along with her weeping willow that wasn't doing well. They were told it was something in the soli and the two pin oaks would require supplements with an antibiotic in the mix at a cost of $2,000! Her physician husband declined because the trees are on the banks of a creek and he didn't want the antibiotic ending up in the creek water.
After hearing that. I'm inclined to take my sickly pin oak down. I'll need a larger chainsaw than my 8" pole chainsaw.
The lower trunk is 17" diameter, wondering if I can get away with an 18" chainsaw or if I need to go to a 20"? I'd prefer the 18" because 20" gats too unwieldy to handle for me.

So we have the Mikita recommendation, what do you think about Husqvarna Power Axe 350i 40-volt 18-in Brushless Battery Chainsaw 7.5 Ah?

Alternately I was thinking perhaps a cheep corded 18" Worx to fell the tree and a better quality cordless brushless 14" or 16" to deal with the branches?

What does the minyan think?
 

pete

not peace but 2 Beers!
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I have a pin oak with lots of dead branches and dead ends that look like the suckers took over the lower to mid section of the branch.
It's not just my pin oak. Someone in the neighborhood told me she had an arborist look at her two pin oaks in not quite as bad shape but similar along with her weeping willow that wasn't doing well. They were told it was something in the soli and the two pin oaks would require supplements with an antibiotic in the mix at a cost of $2,000! Her physician husband declined because the trees are on the banks of a creek and he didn't want the antibiotic ending up in the creek water.
After hearing that. I'm inclined to take my sickly pin oak down. I'll need a larger chainsaw than my 8" pole chainsaw.
The lower trunk is 17" diameter, wondering if I can get away with an 18" chainsaw or if I need to go to a 20"? I'd prefer the 18" because 20" gats too unwieldy to handle for me.

So we have the Mikita recommendation, what do you think about Husqvarna Power Axe 350i 40-volt 18-in Brushless Battery Chainsaw 7.5 Ah?

Alternately I was thinking perhaps a cheep corded 18" Worx to fell the tree and a better quality cordless brushless 14" or 16" to deal with the branches?

What does the minyan think?
If you have an existing ecosystem of battery tools or planning a migration, that may be main choice driver. I choose the Makita as I had their driver, drill, angle grinder, circular saw already and my kid has them too. picked up a larger impact driver I now use for swapping out seasonal tires and love them all. However it also rated very well in reviews.

That said, another consideration in this case is whether you can borrow or rent one (typ rental 20 inch around $50 to $70 for 4hrs to all day).

Borrowing would allow you to pick up a nice battery unit but then if you seldom cut stuff up, and a cord works, then this a much less costly option. In either case I'd aim for one that spins up to the 10K to 14K rpm and consider the usable bar length is typically an 1inch to 1 1/2 inch shorter.

Theory wise you can cut a tree ~2x the width of the available bar but i'd ponder the desire if you haven't used one much.

Another option that has worked well for me, to save cash for tree trimming is hiring the job out but you doing clean up. Not always a big saver but I've paid 1/2 to 1/3 the full cost at times. For me it's not a big deal as I stack and burn wood, and can bin up or drive to landfill cuttings.

If you haven't done much cutting, don't forget safety equip especially if you're not comfortable with using saws .. If not, I'd definitely consider subbing out the main take down and then do clean up and smaller cuts oneself. Saw can be deadly very quickly and too, a falling tree.

In terms of the Husqvarna Power Axe 350i, I really haven't a feel. I suspect it's decent where online, the one review I looked at noted it takes some time to recharge but overall good. I don't know how long it lasts for for example, the Makita and some similar ones recharge in the 45 min range so if you have 2 sets of batteries, you can work stuff continuous. If you don't cut often or take a few breaks or plan to clean after cutting, then it's a nit.
 

neonorchid

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If you have an existing ecosystem of battery tools or planning a migration, that may be main choice driver. I choose the Makita as I had their driver, drill, angle grinder, circular saw already and my kid has them too. picked up a larger impact driver I now use for swapping out seasonal tires and love them all. However it also rated very well in reviews.

That said, another consideration in this case is whether you can borrow or rent one (typ rental 20 inch around $50 to $70 for 4hrs to all day).

Borrowing would allow you to pick up a nice battery unit but then if you seldom cut stuff up, and a cord works, then this a much less costly option. In either case I'd aim for one that spins up to the 10K to 14K rpm and consider the usable bar length is typically an 1inch to 1 1/2 inch shorter.

Theory wise you can cut a tree ~2x the width of the available bar but i'd ponder the desire if you haven't used one much.

Another option that has worked well for me, to save cash for tree trimming is hiring the job out but you doing clean up. Not always a big saver but I've paid 1/2 to 1/3 the full cost at times. For me it's not a big deal as I stack and burn wood, and can bin up or drive to landfill cuttings.

If you haven't done much cutting, don't forget safety equip especially if you're not comfortable with using saws .. If not, I'd definitely consider subbing out the main take down and then do clean up and smaller cuts oneself. Saw can be deadly very quickly and too, a falling tree.

In terms of the Husqvarna Power Axe 350i, I really haven't a feel. I suspect it's decent where online, the one review I looked at noted it takes some time to recharge but overall good. I don't know how long it lasts for for example, the Makita and some similar ones recharge in the 45 min range so if you have 2 sets of batteries, you can work stuff continuous. If you don't cut often or take a few breaks or plan to clean after cutting, then it's a nit.
Actually, would like to find a tree guy with a large chipper shredder to do the clean up, A lot of work but I could bundle branches and put them out on trash day. No fireplace but I could put the logs down the hill out back, out of sight out of mind for the termites to do their thing.
I would have the friend who worked for a tree outfit in his younger years do the felling cuts, after which the two of us would chip away at the rest of it.
I don't have much need for a 20" chainsaw, probably makes more sense to rent one. A quality battery powered 14"'er would be ok to own. Remarkable how much use I get out of the 8" chainsaw on a pole.
I haven't entirely ruled out getting estimates from the professionals.
The woman who showed me her two sickly pin oaks warned that her brother in law, a smart guy, researched felling trees to do it himself and when the thing dropped it hit his house!
Two years ago I watched the guy down the street do the block and tackle thing with ropes attached to his heavy truck to drop an old mature Ash tree he was taking down. He had a guy do the final cut as he drove the truck pulling the falling tree in the direction he was trying to get it to fall. It was a sight to see. I was amazed that the thing came down with razor precision parallel to and just missing his neighbors post and beam "ok corral" fence.
My friend seems confident in his own abilities to drop the pin oak across the width of my back yard without it swinging around hitting the house ... yes I do have a decent homeowners policy:\
 

pete

not peace but 2 Beers!
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Doing project for our local humane society.

Didn't get pic of old shed, but disassembled yesterday and this am started assembling new one and then chopped up base of old one.

next is building new base and then full assembly. The metal pc part sheds are a royal pain. just those handfuls of pcs took a good deal of time given one has to read cryptic instructions and install/tighten 200 screws/bolts/nuts ... wish they just charged $10 more for full length parts in a separate box.

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DesmoDog

Getting off the lift
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I took this little beastie out for a ride today after more carb work. It finally starts from cold and idles like a real bike. A year and a half in and I've now put 90 miles on it... but that should increase now that it's a useable bike again. Who knows, it may even hit 8000 miles in the next year or so. (It sat in a garage for 20 years before I got it...)

IMG_6340.JPG
 

Andy Mink

Everyone loves spring skiing but not in January
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Today was trim the trees and rake up all the pine cones/dead branches/etc.
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pete

not peace but 2 Beers!
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Hung Drywall in kids garage. Had to move host of features in the way .. Garage door opener, conduit, brackets. I'm not great at mudding but good at sanding.

Shelves repurposed and will need to come down later when finish sanding and painting but jobs worst part is done.

We got to finish up front 18" by door but need to do some framing work on door.


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pete

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time for a bump ....

Here's one I did years ago when I splurged and bought a Dyson .. which I highly recommend.

simply a 12x48" shelf, an Ironing board hanger (with sides bent in a wee), organizer bins. They all came with screws and I only needed a few to screw into studs (I did put Felt furniture leg slids in back to give some wall venting)

Total even today <$20

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