• For more information on how to avoid pop-up ads and still support SkiTalk click HERE.

Recommendation for ski's (and length/width/profile) for Tahoe, low intermediate getting back into skiing

sndraco

Booting up
Skier
Joined
Nov 27, 2023
Posts
28
Location
Sacramento, CA
Hi



I am a 53 year old male, 5'8" tall, 150 lbs. Skied last year once at Sugar Bowl (mainly greens and a couple of wider not too steep blues (moguls are difficult for me), and haven't skied for about 10 years prior to that. I used to ski 1-2 days every other year or so at Mt. Hood in the early to mid 2000s (first on rental gear, then with Salomon Evo boots, and Elan PSX Reactors that were hand me downs from a friend 173 cm or so), and after than 1-2 days every other year at Donner. I have taken 4-5 lessons over the years.

My wife is a good skier (cautious) and skis all blues and some blacks. Eventually would like to get good enough to ski with her on all runs.

This year I got a pass to Northstar (next year likely at Sugar Bowl), and bought some new K2 recon boots locally (100 flex) after trying boots at many places (have high instep/arch so lots of boots dig into my feet and K2's were the best).

I plan on skiing 10-12 times this year (snow gods willing) and will take a couple of lessons too. I ski cautiously and in control (I don't like to ski too fast, lose control and crash, as then I lose confidence).

Most of my turns are somewhat parallel though I think I push from my heels too much.

I want to learn to carve (turn better) and ski at a steady pace throughout my turns and slowly increase my speed as I get better, gain more confidence. I will be skiing groomed green and blue runs (and maybe if I get better closer to end of season, maybe some not too steep/not too narrow black runs)

My guess is ski's in the 160-170 cm length (chin to head height), and 70 something to 80 something mm in width. Profile wise, seems like camber with tip rocker/rise for sure, tail not sure

Any recommendations on ski's that would be good for me. ? (I prefer buying to renting for the season and find not many places do season rentals, as cost difference isn't too much and think can get better skis buying). I am fine with buying used (once I get some reco's will post a wtb post here too/demo skis. Bindings need to be Grip Walk compatible.

Hope to keep the skis for a season or two (or more), and then buy again as/if I get better.

From the web research I have done, seems like Head Shape (V6-V8), K2 Disruption 7xC, some of the Volkl deacon series (confused between the different ones esp the X series vs. the numbered ones), Kastle EX74, are possibly good ones. Blister seems to advise wider, longer and tip and tail rockers. (wider and longer isn't what most other sites say)

At curated they recommended Elan explore 80 (160 cm) or Faction Prodigy 1 164 cm.

Thanks much

S

Newbie here so pls let me know if I should have posted this question to the hardgoods forum
 

Alexzn

Ski Squaw
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Posts
1,950
Location
Bay Area and Truckee
Welcome to the community! Congratulations on buying your own boots, this is the most important decision you can make. Tahoe snow is heavy, so we tend to favor a slightly wider ski, but the 70-80 waist is definitely the right call. I will let others who are more familiar with this segment of skis chime in on an exact model. I would just caution about buying skis that are too short. It is better to have a longer ski that is more forgiving than to get a short, but stiff ski. So I would be leaning more to mid 160's lengths.

You do not need a tail rocker on a mid-70 mm ski, this design element does next to nothing for beginners (it is good for easier release in 3D snow and on steeps, which I suspect is not your primary terrain at this point). Better to get a nice solid tail to support you when you inevitably get into the back seat. Dont get a lot of tip rocker either, again it does not do very much in your target terrain. Have fun skiing!

Alex
 

BigSlick

Getting off the lift
Skier
Joined
Mar 12, 2020
Posts
200
Location
California
Rossignol Experience 82 or 86 Basalt might be a good all around option where you can find last years model new:


Ski Essentials has a nice overview of wider frontside skis here:


For something more versatile and fun, especially if you want to venture into bumps and off piste a little once you gain some confidence, the Ripstick 88 would be a good choice. Good comparison of mid 80s all mountain skis, which is the Tahoe sweet spot for a one ski quiver for an intermediate skier:

 
Last edited:

Tricia

The Velvet Hammer
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Posts
27,108
Location
Reno
I will agree with @Alexzn
IMHO you can do a lot with your own fitted boots and be fickle with your skis.
Get something in an intermediate range that will grow with you but don't be too disappointed if you excel enough to outgrow the skis.
Maybe somehting like the Rossignol Experience Basalt is a good direction.

Northstar has some really good learning terrain so you should progress well.

If you want instructor recomendations at northstar I have a few I now there.
 

Pat AKA mustski

I can keep a Secret
Ski Diva Tester
SkiTalk Supporter
Joined
Nov 15, 2015
Posts
4,752
Location
Big Bear, California
I agree on the Rossi Experience Basalt. I demoed the 82 in Taos and skied it in bumps, on groomers, in a few inches of fresh and it was a very friendly ski- forgiving and compliant. It would be helpful in your progression. I haven’t tried the 86.
 
Thread Starter
TS
S

sndraco

Booting up
Skier
Joined
Nov 27, 2023
Posts
28
Location
Sacramento, CA
Thanks I will go through the video and look for ski's like it too. Not seeing any of the last years on ski essentials (sold out) and one q, re size it only comes in 160 or 168 (Think nose height would be 165) so go up or go down?

And q re width range is 80mm ok, and 84 ok too? whats too narrow or too wide?

And similar know 165 is right size, whats too short/tall?

any other reco's similar to this, or different?

Thanks

S
 
Last edited:
Thread Starter
TS
S

sndraco

Booting up
Skier
Joined
Nov 27, 2023
Posts
28
Location
Sacramento, CA
I will agree with @Alexzn
IMHO you can do a lot with your own fitted boots and be fickle with your skis.
Get something in an intermediate range that will grow with you but don't be too disappointed if you excel enough to outgrow the skis.
Maybe somehting like the Rossignol Experience Basalt is a good direction.

Northstar has some really good learning terrain so you should progress well.

If you want instructor recomendations at northstar I have a few I now there.
Thanks much Sent pm.
 

Pat AKA mustski

I can keep a Secret
Ski Diva Tester
SkiTalk Supporter
Joined
Nov 15, 2015
Posts
4,752
Location
Big Bear, California
Thanks I will go through the video and look for ski's like it too. Not seeing any of the last years on ski essentials (sold out) and one q, re size it only comes in 160 or 168 (Think nose height would be 165) so go up or go down?

any other reco's similar to this, or different?

Thanks

S
168 is a better choice and will be more stable at speed. This is a REALLY friendly ski so it won't feel too long. I am 5'2" - 135 lbs - and demoed the 160 and liked the length just fine.
 

dbostedo

Asst. Gathermeister
Moderator
Contributor
SkiTalk Supporter
Joined
Feb 9, 2016
Posts
17,722
Location
75% Virginia, 25% Colorado
Thanks wouldn't 86 be too much ski for low intermediate (high beginner/low intermediate) skier? and also is width fine (asking as the reco was for a 82 width?
86 would be OK. The difference between 82 and 86, for the skis we're talking about, is not large. 86 is probably at the higher range for what you should be looking at - but still in range and fine IMO. If you could get the same or similar ski in 82, or even a bit narrower, I would recommend that though.
 
Thread Starter
TS
S

sndraco

Booting up
Skier
Joined
Nov 27, 2023
Posts
28
Location
Sacramento, CA
What do I loose/gain re narrower/wider width say between 76-86 (lets assume the skis are the same)? for length I think shorter sa6y 160 is easier to manage, easier to start turns, less tips crossing, and longer 168 or so is more stable at speed, though a little tougher to manage

PS since first time back skiing and bought new boots locally (ie not on sale), and also not working presently, would like to keep ski budget hopefully in the $3xx range or less (if thats reasonable) and I am fine buying demo/used as well.

Theres a pair of 2020 (I think) Rossignol Experience 84Ai 160 cm locally, how would they be? Presume 160 is shorter than ideal.
 
Last edited:

Tony Storaro

Glorified Tobogganer
Skier
SkiTalk Supporter
Joined
Mar 2, 2020
Posts
7,316
Location
Europe
What do I loose/gain re narrower/wider width say between 76-86 (lets assume the skis are the same)? for length I think shorter sa6y 160 is easier to manage, easier to start turns, less tips crossing, and longer 168 or so is more stable at speed, though a little tougher to manage

PS since first time back skiing and bought new boots locally would like to keep ski budget reasonable hopefully in the $3xx range or less (if thats reasonable).

I believe at this point stability at speed is the least of your concerns. Neither of these will be stable at speed but that’s OK, you need the ski that will give you the most confidence. Both 76 and 86 will work perfectly fine on groomers. Go 168, this initial period in which you are afraid of the bit longer ski will pass very quickly. Just my $0.02 of course.
 
Thread Starter
TS
S

sndraco

Booting up
Skier
Joined
Nov 27, 2023
Posts
28
Location
Sacramento, CA
I believe at this point stability at speed is the least of your concerns. Neither of these will be stable at speed but that’s OK, you need the ski that will give you the most confidence. Both 76 and 86 will work perfectly fine on groomers. Go 168, this initial period in which you are afraid of the bit longer ski will pass very quickly. Just my $0.02 of course.
Thanks and you are absolutely right, I am /will be unstable at speed as I get uncomfortable when speed gets a bit above where I feel in control and that leads me to bail out/skid turn etc or at the least become unstable as body tightens.
 

johnnyvw

Out on the slopes
Skier
Joined
Dec 20, 2016
Posts
1,633
Location
near RDU
Take a look at Nordica Navigator 85. No longer produced but you should be able to find them pretty easily. They have gotten very good reviews here on Skitalk https://www.skitalk.com/threads/2022-nordica-navigator-85.24082/
They are some of the easiest skiing skis I have been on (I own a pair, 172 length) and a ton of fun. They should be easy to ski at your current level and will be a good ski to progress on.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mdf

Tony Storaro

Glorified Tobogganer
Skier
SkiTalk Supporter
Joined
Mar 2, 2020
Posts
7,316
Location
Europe
Thanks and you are absolutely right, I am /will be unstable at speed as I get uncomfortable when speed gets a bit above where I feel in control and that leads me to bail out/skid turn etc or at the least become unstable as body tightens.

Yes, don’t worry about speed at this point. What is important is that you are on ski that wont go zig when you want them to go zag and will stop when you want them to stop. Nice and easy. And you should be smiling at the end of the day. There are lots of ski like this.
 

Sponsor

Staff online

Top