Dwight

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I used to carry a roll of sticky cling, but if you don't use it, it becomes unusable. I probably need to lighten up my vest for next year. In the Midwest, you really don't need much. True trauma packs are close by and anything super serious, you are loading and going fast.
 

Spam16v

Zac
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New to patrol, trained OEC with a NSP patrol pack, looking to also gear up a vest for flexibility. Any hints or tip into HOW to pack a NSP patrol uniform vest? IE: what & where given space and access limitations? Thank you.
 

pais alto

me encanta el país alto
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New to patrol, trained OEC with a NSP patrol pack, looking to also gear up a vest for flexibility. Any hints or tip into HOW to pack a NSP patrol uniform vest? IE: what & where given space and access limitations? Thank you.
As an EMT-B patroller (retired now) the medical stuff I carried was mostly ABC things - CPR mask (compatible with the O2 system), OPAs and NPAs (don’t know if those are in OEC protocols), tongue depressors, gauze pad assortment, abdominal pads, kerlix, triangle bandages, bandaids (Snoopy, Spider-Man, Wonder Woman), glutose, aspirin (for cardiac, again I’m unsure about OEC), vinyl gloves, etc. On cold days I’d sometimes carry chemical heating pads, but they either leaked or activated if I carried them too long. I think I posted a list here upthread.

But as to how to pack a vest, I grouped airway stuff in one pocket, bleeding stuff in two others, meds and such in one pocket, paperwork and manual in one, tools (vise grip/leatherman, zip ties, etc.) in one, rescue stuff (rope, webbing, ‘biners, brake, slings) in the back pocket. That way I could reach for what I needed from memory without having to paw through different things. In my system, bleeding stuff, tools, and PPE was in the left side pockets, meds and airway on the right side. If you develop a system based on your personal logic and associations then you can reach stuff quickly (and hopefully not look like an unprofessional goof).

Incidentally, I didn't carry splints or (much) other stuff that wasn’t ABC. We had trauma, airway, medication, and rescue response packs at the top stations full of all the possible stuff that could be delivered quickly enough - my focus was on assessment and stabilization, then radio for the cavalry. For some reports, if we dispatched from the top stations we’d carry the appropriate response pack.
 

Spam16v

Zac
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WNY
I bought a whole assortment of clear zippered bags reinforced with mesh off Amazon so I’ll be fumbling around tomorrow initially packing the vest. Got a second set of airways and cpr barriers also. Spent a few hours cutting and ironing my cravats too after a trip to JoAnns which I dread. Shadowing this past year, it appears we’ll be doing a lot more splinting tha anything. So cravats and Sams are a gotta have. Thank you, the insight helps.
As an EMT-B patroller (retired now) the medical stuff I carried was mostly ABC things - CPR mask (compatible with the O2 system), OPAs and NPAs (don’t know if those are in OEC protocols), tongue depressors, gauze pad assortment, abdominal pads, kerlix, triangle bandages, bandaids (Snoopy, Spider-Man, Wonder Woman), glutose, aspirin (for cardiac, again I’m unsure about OEC), vinyl gloves, etc. On cold days I’d sometimes carry chemical heating pads, but they either leaked or activated if I carried them too long. I think I posted a list here upthread.

But as to how to pack a vest, I grouped airway stuff in one pocket, bleeding stuff in two others, meds and such in one pocket, paperwork and manual in one, tools (vise grip/leatherman, zip ties, etc.) in one, rescue stuff (rope, webbing, ‘biners, brake, slings) in the back pocket. That way I could reach for what I needed from memory without having to paw through different things. In my system, bleeding stuff, tools, and PPE was in the left side pockets, meds and airway on the right side. If you develop a system based on your personal logic and associations then you can reach stuff quickly (and hopefully not look like an unprofessional goof).

Incidentally, I didn't carry splints or (much) other stuff that wasn’t ABC. We had trauma, airway, medication, and rescue response packs at the top stations full of all the possible stuff that could be delivered quickly enough - my focus was on assessment and stabilization, then radio for the cavalry. For some reports, if we dispatched from the top stations we’d carry the appropriate response pack.
 

Dwight

Practitioner of skiing, solid and liquid
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Great info @pais alto. I think as patrollers we carry too much at times. Abc is the key. Everything else is usually handled with trauma bag. NSP says no meds, but aspirin would be smart. Let common sense prevail. Definitely find out what the majority of incidents are at your hill and pack according. I do have a few SAMs, beacuse the are easy to carry and Israeli bandanges. Small and can be used for any thing major.
 

charlier

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My transceiver, with shovel and probe, trauma kit, cpr mask, sam splint, radio, skins, extra puffy, gloves, goggles, small notebook, and pen. SAM splints were helpful in the sidecountry.
 

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