Press Release: Rossignol introduces a more sustainable ski with the Essential

Philpug

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Rossignol introduces a more sustainable ski with the Essential

Developed with the fewest amount of raw materials, 75% of the Essential ski is recyclable

Park City, UT, April 22, 2022 – Currently celebrating its 115-year anniversary, Rossignol is highlighting its transformative commitment to more sustainable product development, eco-conscious design, product life-cycle and recycling solutions with the introduction of its all-new Rossignol Essential ski.

Available in limited quantities in Fall-Winter ‘22-23, the Rossignol Essential was developed using the simplest and fewest amount of raw materials, ensuring more than 75% of the ski is 100% recyclable.

“Improving end-of-life management for a product means better design right from the start,” said David Bouvier, Senior Marketing Director, Mountain Sports Equipment, Rossignol. “This has inspired us to design a ski made from as few materials as possible, all of which can be recycled and reused. In comparison with a conventional ski with a current average recyclability rate of just 10%, we’re excited to announce that over 75% of the Essential ski can be recycled. By 2028, our aim is to have one-third of our ski collection developed through this same approach and ethos.”

Rossignol is also applying this same spirit of simplicity and recyclability across other product collections currently in development including: ski boots, technical equipment, and apparel.

To address the current recycling challenges with winter sports equipment and the brand’s responsibility as a category leader, the Rossignol Group has also entered a partnership with MTB, a leading player in recycling and related manufacturing processes. MTB has recently developed of a new water-free process for improved recycling of conventional modern ski constructions. This development was synchronized with that of the Rossignol Essential ski to ensure maximum compatibility and the goal of contributing to a circular economy and product life cycle. Recycled materials can then be repurposed across automotive, garden, or construction industries, and in the future, within new Rossignol Group products. Operational in 2023, MTB’s Recycling Box is an innovative new tool enabling improved recycling of modern conventional ski, boot, and pole constructions.

After announcing its RESPECT program in 2020, a wide-reaching CSR initiative with targets to reduce its carbon footprint by 30% by 2030, and its industrial waste by 40% by 2025, the Rossignol Group continues to place its environmental and social commitments at the heart of all its major strategic initiatives. To that end, each of the Group’s manufacturing facilities will be operating on renewable energy by January 2023.

Learn more about the RESPECT program here as well as more on Rossignol’s all-new Essential ski here.
 

JWMN

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Rossignol introduces a more sustainable ski with the Essential

Developed with the fewest amount of raw materials, 75% of the Essential ski is recyclable

Park City, UT, April 22, 2022 – Currently celebrating its 115-year anniversary, Rossignol is highlighting its transformative commitment to more sustainable product development, eco-conscious design, product life-cycle and recycling solutions with the introduction of its all-new Rossignol Essential ski.

Available in limited quantities in Fall-Winter ‘22-23, the Rossignol Essential was developed using the simplest and fewest amount of raw materials, ensuring more than 75% of the ski is 100% recyclable.

“Improving end-of-life management for a product means better design right from the start,” said David Bouvier, Senior Marketing Director, Mountain Sports Equipment, Rossignol. “This has inspired us to design a ski made from as few materials as possible, all of which can be recycled and reused. In comparison with a conventional ski with a current average recyclability rate of just 10%, we’re excited to announce that over 75% of the Essential ski can be recycled. By
Great intentions, but how? Are we going to be able to bring the skis and boots back to the retailer for recycling? The curbside recycling sure won't take it.
 

dbostedo

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Great intentions, but how? Are we going to be able to bring the skis and boots back to the retailer for recycling? The curbside recycling sure won't take it.
Just from the press release it sounds like the partnership with MTB will provide some way to do it... send them in maybe? Guessing here, but that would seem to make the most sense.
 

neonorchid

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Interesting concept, even if nothing more than a publicity stunt (limited production).
Gotta say that great-looking retro top sheet would be a cool match for the bamboo poles set.
Only, 103 - 69 - 122 not for me thank you.
Besides, I'm pretty sure we already have sustainable recycling programs; Adirondack Chairs, Ski Fences, @Bill Talbot (skis and bindings), @Philpug (bindings), @mdf (boots), come to mind... ;)
 

Uncle-A

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Interesting concept, even if nothing more than a publicity stunt (limited production).
Gotta say that great-looking retro top sheet would be a cool match for the bamboo poles set.
Only, 103 - 69 - 122 not for me thank you.
Besides, I'm pretty sure we already have sustainable recycling programs; Adirondack Chairs, Ski Fences, @Bill Talbot (skis and bindings), @Philpug (bindings), @mdf (boots), come to mind... ;)
I was thinking about the same things chairs and fences. We should also add ski shop and ski house decorations. I look at it as art but I know not all will agree.
 

cantunamunch

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Just from the press release it sounds like the partnership with MTB will provide some way to do it... send them in maybe? Guessing here, but that would seem to make the most sense.

"Sending" anything in creates the same problem as glass recycling - huge transport footprint. FAR better to create a product that fits existing in situ recycling programs.

What materials are currently recycled, regardless of jurisdiction, regardless of consumer-side waste stream sorting?

Alu and steel. All remotely developed waste programs recycle these - post consumer if necessary.

Therefore it is more recycling-oriented to make a greater % of the product out of Alu or Steel - especially if you can point to your source streams and say "O LOOK : post-consumer!"

Now look at the ski again - 35% aluminum (by weight I presume) and 7% steel. Doesn't that strike you as somewhat high? Even granting that Alu density at 2.7g/cm^3 is more than 3x higher than most wood densities at ~0.8g/cm^3, 35% Alu by weight is ... quite high.

High Alu, High steel, wood -> you are making a ski that any incinerator would be glad to have in their waste stream, because the wood can fuel recovery of both the alu and the steel.

And notice that this kind of eco policy also makes complete sense if you plan to make price point MTBs out of Alu and steel instead of resins.

PS the RESPECT link here is to the french page. From the lack of complaints I suspect few have clicked through :D


Learn more about the RESPECT program here as well as more on Rossignol’s all-new Essential ski here.
 

cantunamunch

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Or Google translate built into browsers has gotten good. (It has.)

It may have done - but it's still an opt-in feature, no?

Anyway, I thought it was a bit of a joke, particularly as my brain wants to read the image text as bethechange.be
 

crgildart

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How about making products that work 100% as intended for 10-15 instead of 1-5 years and stop convincing the consumers that the next great thing is really all that much better than the 5 year old one?? :huh:
 

cantunamunch

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How about making products that work 100% as intended for 10-15 instead of 1-5 years and stop convincing the consumers that the next great thing is really all that much better than the 5 year old one?? :huh:

Reduce - Reuse - Recycle. There's no money in the first two :)
 

Tom K.

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Mr. Happy says "ooh, looks like it might be a fun carver!"

Mr. Grumpy Pants says "OK, a cheaper ski to build that they can charge extra for the halo".

I sure enjoy my Exp 86 tis!

That there is what we in management circles call a compliment sandwich!
 

cantunamunch

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It could be. Maybe Belgium is really into recycling?

^ you are beginning to see the number of levels on which that joke works :) Also, the head of the European Environmental Agency is ... Belgian. And his name ends in cx, just like Eddy.

#whylettheMasonsandTemplarshavealltheconspiracyfun


Mr. Happy says "ooh, looks like it might be a fun carver!"

Mr. Grumpy Pants says "OK, a cheaper ski to build that they can charge extra for the halo".

Is it easier though? I am thinking getting the thing to even stay together is going to be a sweaty drag-out fight if they spec low resin content and low VOCs.

This direction of environmentalism kind of reminds me of Swiss solid-wood construction.

That there is what we in management circles call a compliment sandwich!

*wonders if Rossi feel squeezed* :)
 

Uncle-A

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How about making products that work 100% as intended for 10-15 instead of 1-5 years and stop convincing the consumers that the next great thing is really all that much better than the 5 year old one?? :huh:
If they did that they would be out of business in no time.
 

fatbob

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If they did that they would be out of business in no time.
Exactly - which is why the greenwashing in lots on consumer products is just pious BS. I'd have a lot more respect for the ski industry if they acknowledged the true working life of hardgoods and maybe concentrated on softgoods which do wear out or whatever.
 

cantunamunch

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greenwashing in lots on consumer products is just pious BS.

Pretty much in line with most other environmentalism, then. Funny how silent the 'plant a tree' activists are when the forest fires hit.
 

Ken_R

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Skis can be reused. I would like a bunch for my fence. Dont throw skis away send them to me. :cool::ogbiggrin:
 

François Pugh

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"Sending" anything in creates the same problem as glass recycling - huge transport footprint. FAR better to create a product that fits existing in situ recycling programs.

What materials are currently recycled, regardless of jurisdiction, regardless of consumer-side waste stream sorting?

Alu and steel. All remotely developed waste programs recycle these - post consumer if necessary.

Therefore it is more recycling-oriented to make a greater % of the product out of Alu or Steel - especially if you can point to your source streams and say "O LOOK : post-consumer!"

Now look at the ski again - 35% aluminum (by weight I presume) and 7% steel. Doesn't that strike you as somewhat high? Even granting that Alu density at 2.7g/cm^3 is more than 3x higher than most wood densities at ~0.8g/cm^3, 35% Alu by weight is ... quite high.

High Alu, High steel, wood -> you are making a ski that any incinerator would be glad to have in their waste stream, because the wood can fuel recovery of both the alu and the steel.

And notice that this kind of eco policy also makes complete sense if you plan to make price point MTBs out of Alu and steel instead of resins.

PS the RESPECT link here is to the french page. From the lack of complaints I suspect few have clicked through :D
Mais, voyons donc!? C'est en anglais maintenant. :huh:
 
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