• For more information on how to avoid pop-up ads and still support SkiTalk click HERE.

Ski instruction recommendations (Colorado)

asolo

Booting up
Skier
Joined
Dec 25, 2018
Posts
138
I am looking for recommendations for ski instruction in Colorado. I have been working on my skiing more an more obsessively for the last three seasons (this season I already have 23 days, many of these full 7 hours). I think at this point I am not going to make progress w/o somebody outside observing and suggesting corrections. I am considering finding a pro instructor, it would be great to have somebody really experienced.

On another note, I am not sure why I can not quite get skiing. It is super frustrating. I am a skater and on skates I feel as if I was born on them. I can still jump (well, singles) and glide, so my balance and athletic ability is there. I know how to use edges and how to store kinetic energy in a leg/boot and use it to propel body into a jump. But I can't. Ski. A damn. Sometimes I just want skates on those hard pack slopes. I know they would have worked better than those damn crippling long sticks that never bite.
 

Mendieta

Master of Snowplow
SkiTalk Tester
Contributor
Joined
Aug 17, 2016
Posts
4,988
Location
SF Bay Area, CA, USA
You are asking all the right questions. Where do you ski in Colorado? This would help narrow the search :thumb:

You may also want to modify the thread title to be more specific. Or PM me if you need help
 

Tricia

The Velvet Hammer
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Posts
28,395
Location
Reno
Glad to see you're not giving up on skiing.

As Mendieta said, where are you skiing? I have a handful of great suggestions, depending on where you're skiing.
 
Thread Starter
TS
asolo

asolo

Booting up
Skier
Joined
Dec 25, 2018
Posts
138
Glad to see you're not giving up on skiing.

As Mendieta said, where are you skiing? I have a handful of great suggestions, depending on where you're skiing.

I have IKON pass, which leads to Winter Park, Copper, Eldora, Steamboat. Recently, Steamboat has been my favorite, despite 3.5. hour drive. Eldora is easy and close by, but between storms gets very hard packed and frustrating.
 

Steve

SkiMangoJazz
Pass Pulled
Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Posts
2,338
If you skate so well you will be able to ski well, you just need some good coaching to help you transfer the skills over.
Take a private lesson with a recommended Instructor, it will be costly, but worth it. If you post your most convenient resort here I'm sure someone will be able to suggest someone to you.
 

karlo

Out on the slopes
Inactive
Joined
May 11, 2017
Posts
2,708
Location
NJ
I am looking for recommendations for ski instruction in Colorado. I have been working on my skiing more an more obsessively for the last three seasons (this season I already have 23 days, many of these full 7 hours). I think at this point I am not going to make progress w/o somebody outside observing and suggesting corrections. I am considering finding a pro instructor, it would be great to have somebody really experienced.

On another note, I am not sure why I can not quite get skiing. It is super frustrating. I am a skater and on skates I feel as if I was born on them. I can still jump (well, singles) and glide, so my balance and athletic ability is there. I know how to use edges and how to store kinetic energy in a leg/boot and use it to propel body into a jump. But I can't. Ski. A damn. Sometimes I just want skates on those hard pack slopes. I know they would have worked better than those damn crippling long sticks that never bite.

I am just guessing that there is a gap in what you see on the hill and what is actually there. I once rode with a very skilled surfer on his second day riding a snowboard. He kept losing balance and falling. I pointed out that, when surfing, the direction of a wave’s propulsive force and slope is highly correlated to the direction of its travel. Not so in skiing. I pointed out to him that the direction of the fall line ( the direction of gravity’s “propulsive” force, and the slope) is very typically not the same direction as the trail (the direction of travel). Once he noticed that and began riding the hill, not the trail, he rode beautifully, even down black trails. I couldn’t believe I was watching someone ride only the second time in his life.

You could have a problem with alignment of your boots. Nevertheless, whether or not the following is what’s affecting your ability to ski, they are well worth noting.

1. Be very observant as to where the fall line is. Before starting off, fix it in your mind. Imagine that fall line being the direction from one end of an ice rink to the other. Imagine the slope as the ice rink (or I like dance floor). Look up while skiing and train yourself to watch the ever changing fall line, changes that can happen between every turn. Want every turn to be perfect, especially at speed? One has better be aware of every perturbation in fall line.

2. In transition, the neutral point between turns, stand on that slope as if you were standing on an ice rink; stand on the flats of your skis as if you were standing on the flats of your blades. In an ice rink, that means an athletic stance with you center of mass directly and vertically over the blades. On a slope, exactly the same; just that your body is perpendicular/vertical to the slope, not to a level-to-gravity ice rink.

Good luck and have fun.
 

Tricia

The Velvet Hammer
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Posts
28,395
Location
Reno
I have IKON pass, which leads to Winter Park, Copper, Eldora, Steamboat. Recently, Steamboat has been my favorite, despite 3.5. hour drive. Eldora is easy and close by, but between storms gets very hard packed and frustrating.
Sadly, I don't have suggestions for those places, but there are many here who probably do.
@Ron for Steamboat
@dean_spirito @UGASkiDawg @coskigirl for Copper
We have a lot of members who are familiar with all of the resorts you mention.
 

martyg

Making fresh tracks
Industry Insider
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Posts
2,258
Jennifer Simpson. PSIA D-Team. Aspen.

Mike Porter. Legend. Vail.

Hit me up if you come to SW CO. We'll go to Purg. It will cost you lunch.

Enjoy.
 

Uncle Louie

The Original Gathermeister
Skier
Joined
Mar 19, 2017
Posts
499
I'm thinking if you are a good skater (assuming figure skating here) that when you get on skis you may be expecting the ski to respond like a skate given the same movements. Imagine how your skates would respond with a 6' blade on them:eek:

I've had hockey players in beginner classes pull off a really aggressive hockey stop out of frustration with the ski not responding they way they expected it to. I never tried to change them back to turning in a wedge but simply slowed their movements down and worked with them to "wait for the ski to respond". Also a lot of skating movements are done by rotating the upper body. In snow skiing that's usually a no-no. Could be you have multiple trained neuromuscular pathways that use skiing left over from skating that "feel right" but work wrong.

As somebody already mentioned have your alignment checked, assuming you own the boots you are in. I would strongly recommend the crew at A Racer's Edge on main street in Breckenridge. Call ahead

I think if you went to either Copper or Winter Park and got a Certified Level 3 Instructor it could open the door to some major changes. Be sure to tell the instructor about the ice skating history. Good luck !
 

martyg

Making fresh tracks
Industry Insider
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Posts
2,258
Forgot to add... And it may be a superb fit for you - Charlie MacArthur, Aspen. Charlie is PSIA L3 in alpine, tele, Nodic, and snowboard. If I remember correctly he was on the US National team for Nordic. Also a master's in psychology. With his command of Nordic and alpine he may be the best resource for you to bridge that gap.
 

Tricia

The Velvet Hammer
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Posts
28,395
Location
Reno
I think if you went to either Copper or Winter Park and got a Certified Level 3 Instructor it could open the door to some major changes. Be sure to tell the instructor about the ice skating history. Good luck !
Good advice.


I have IKON pass, which leads to Winter Park, Copper, Eldora, Steamboat. Recently, Steamboat has been my favorite, despite 3.5. hour drive. Eldora is easy and close by, but between storms gets very hard packed and frustrating.

Jennifer Simpson. PSIA D-Team. Aspen.

Mike Porter. Legend. Vail.

Hit me up if you come to SW CO. We'll go to Purg. It will cost you lunch.

Enjoy.
Marty, your suggestions are absolutely top notch, but not at the resorts where he is skiing.
Most of the instructors I know are at Aspen, Breck, Vail, etc.
 

Coach13

Making fresh tracks
Skier
Joined
Nov 15, 2015
Posts
2,091
Location
No. VA
I think Rusty Guy still teaches at Winter Park. He’s a solid level 3 instructor.
 

martyg

Making fresh tracks
Industry Insider
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Posts
2,258
Good advice.




Marty, your suggestions are absolutely top notch, but not at the resorts where he is skiing.
Most of the instructors I know are at Aspen, Breck, Vail, etc.

Agreed. However if you are going to spend the money on a full-day private lesson.... Might as well get the best and realize full value.

As I thought about it, Charlie at Aspen would be the man.
 

Tricia

The Velvet Hammer
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
Joined
Nov 1, 2015
Posts
28,395
Location
Reno

John J

Booting up
Skier
Joined
Feb 18, 2018
Posts
11
Since you have an Ikon pass, I'd suggest Copper. If you go up the mountain, all the greens are lookers right, or skiers left when you look at the mountain as a whole. It's unlikely you'll encounter terrain that's going to terrify you. Although it's not part of Ikon, Loveland is another excellent choice. If you confine yourself to one side of the mountain, the beginner/intermediate area, you will pay about 1/2 of what a normal lift ticket is. The beginner area, in my opinion, is quite vast. Remind yourself that you are trying to learn basics and fundamentals. I suggest fundamentals based on your last sentence, something about, "the skis won't bite." You're probably in the back seat. IMHO you don't need a PSIA level 3 to teach you fundamentals. If you can get an enthusiastic level 1 that will encourage you when you do things right, and perhaps hammer you when you're doing things wrong, that's all you really need. To any trained eye, what you're doing will be immediately apparent. The goal is to have fun and skill build. Expert skiers are not born, otherwise there would be many more of them. You mentioned you have 3 seasons under your belt. If you're still feeling uncomfortable, I'd suggest you need to ADD new movement and balance patterns to your skiing. What I mean by that statement is, whatever you've been doing, isn't working for you. It is totally awesome that you're exploring an alternative solution to what you've been doing, an you realize it. With that said, I'm just making generalizations. If you're really serious, consider a multi week training course. There are some excellent ones in Canada. Nonstop and Core are a couple that come to mind, among several others. Core operates in Whistler/Blackcomb, while Nonstop operates primarily in Fernie and Banff. In both courses, you will also get video analysis, so you can see what you're doing. I'm surprised there aren't more "improvement camps" in the States. There are "Steep and Deep" camps at Winter Park/MJ and Jackson Hole and plenty of other places, not to mention Bob Barne's "Bob's Mogul Camp," which are all excellent programs, but if you're not ready for it, they can be quite intimidating. That's not to say that the instructors aren't excellent and you won't learn anything or improve your skiing. If you go to a "Steep and Deep" camp, understand that that's the type of terrain you're going to ski. They will break you down into groups of similar ability levels.

Yeah...Boots are a big deal. If you're slopping around inside your boots, you're not going to be able to accurately transmit your movements to your skis. If your ski bases don't track across the snow evenly, you will be on one set of edges or the other due to being bull legged or knock kneed. This is a canting issue. Not all people encounter these issues, but if you happen to be one of them, you'll have a pretty bad day on the mountain, even if your fore/aft and lateral balance are excellent. Furthermore, if you don't know how to properly put your boots on and how to buckle them, this can have an effect on your skiing. I've rambled enough. Best wishes to you. Embrace your passion and never give up. Cheers.
 

Magi

Instructor
Instructor
Joined
Apr 8, 2017
Posts
404
Location
Winter Park, Colorado
On another note, I am not sure why I can not quite get skiing. It is super frustrating. I am a skater and on skates I feel as if I was born on them. I can still jump (well, singles) and glide, so my balance and athletic ability is there. I know how to use edges and how to store kinetic energy in a leg/boot and use it to propel body into a jump. But I can't. Ski. A damn. Sometimes I just want skates on those hard pack slopes. I know they would have worked better than those damn crippling long sticks that never bite.

How wide are your skis underfoot, do you own your boots, and who fitted them?
 

Sponsor

Staff online

Top