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International (Europe/Japan/Southern Hemisphere) Skiing the Alps - advice wanted

Rod9301

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If you're in Europe for less than three months, no need for international driving permit
 

Swiss Toni

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mdf

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Its quick and east to get an IDP at AAA. When I rented a car for a day the agency didn't want to see it, though.
 

BLiP

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If you're in Europe for less than three months, no need for international driving permit
I believe many, if not most, countries require that you carry a local translation of your driver's license. This is what an IDP accomplishes. They are very easy to get from AAA in the US and cost $20. No reason not to get one. Car rental companies don't usually require you to show one at the time of rental, but the local police very well might if you are pulled over or are in an accident. That is what I would be more concerned about. $20 for some piece of mind is money well spent in my opinion.
 

Tony S

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Its quick and east to get an IDP at AAA. When I rented a car for a day the agency didn't want to see it, though.
That's because you had it. ;)
 

Rod MacDonald

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If you do opt for kitzbühel, don't neglect the Jochberg area, all the same qualities but 1/5 of the people.

Oh, and blue run 26 at kitz has a wee surprise half way down.
 

Cheizz

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Go to Alta Badia if you want stellar interconnected carving runs, great food, and views. If you have a (rental) car at your disposal, stay in La Villa or San Cassiano with easy and short drives to Cortina or Kronplatz. The Sella Ronda connects Alta Badia to Aramma/Marmolada, Val di Fassa and Val Gardena.

1696681347085.png

I'm not sure what's unreadable about this trail map...
 

Tony S

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I'm not sure what's unreadable about this trail map...
I think the OP is looking for something at this level of detail - I.e., an actual turn-by-turn navigational aid with lots of metadata, not a high-level overview. Yes, I understand the challenges of scale. Don't shoot the messenger.
Screenshot_20231007-091059.png
 

Zirbl

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Tony S

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Agree that it's not easy to decide where you want to be or see what the layout of the slopes is with the Dolomit Superski map. Other large areas seem to be able to pull it off:

Another one that I have found very useful - though it probably won't help you on the slope in real time - is OpenSkiMap. Check this out, @Mister Tea
 

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Cheizz

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Turn-by-turn navigation using a trail map? Trails run top to bottom and beside it are posts showing the piste name or number, corresponding with the trail map. The big turns in the run that you see on the map actually correspond with reality on the mountain, as do the treeline and other landmarks. Opensnowmap is also very nice and great for preparation, though not ideal on your phone for navigating while skiing.

In other words: trail maps (print) won't get more detailed than the one I posted. I have never known them to be, not even for the smallest mountain that would actually fit every individual tree on the hill drawn out on a map.
 

Tony S

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Turn-by-turn navigation using a trail map? Trails run top to bottom and beside it are posts showing the piste name or number, corresponding with the trail map. The big turns in the run that you see on the map actually correspond with reality on the mountain, as do the treeline and other landmarks. Opensnowmap is also very nice and great for preparation, though not ideal on your phone for navigating while skiing.

In other words: trail maps (print) won't get more detailed than the one I posted. I have never known them to be, not even for the smallest mountain that would actually fit every individual tree on the hill drawn out on a map.
Annnnd ... messenger shot.

That the OP isn't going to get what he's looking for doesn't mean he's not looking for it.
 

Zirbl

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Turn-by-turn navigation using a trail map? Trails run top to bottom
I rather had the impression he's not so much looking for a resort with a good map so much as trying to use the map to establish which resort might be best for him.
 

fatbob

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In other words: trail maps (print) won't get more detailed than the one I posted. I have never known them to be, not even for the smallest mountain that would actually fit every individual tree on the hill drawn out on a map.

I'm sorry this is absolute garbage. Look at any of the quoted Nieheus maps of US or Canadian resorts ( or indeed any N American map) even for "big" areas ( actually unremarkable compared to Euro linked resorts) like Vail or WB.

Entirely different level of detail.

Sure you can navigate ( except round Val Gardena) with that map but it really tells you sod all about terrain or merits of alternates. Now that doesn't really matter in the DS because everything is a broadish man-made groomer.

Really need to look at each resort independently to have a decent preview.

It's not a continental thing. 3V has a complete view on one side of the paper map and a blow up of the relevant valley on the back ( with inserts for other aspects e.g. Orelle on the VT / Les Men sheet).
 

Cheizz

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Chill.
I meant to say "trail maps in EUROPE..."
The trail maps of the 4 Sella Ronda areas also have their own resort on one side and the entire Sella Ronda on the back.

I just hope the trail maps are not the reason to pick one destination over another.
 

Primoz

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Thing is, both maps that @Cheizz and @Tony S posted are actually exactly same. Difference is in ski place. In Europe we don't have let's say 2 runs going down the hill parallel with 100 passages between them and each of this passage and each of million options how to get down from top to bottom station counts as ski run. Normally you have 1 or two runs next to lift, and these two runs (and all connecting runs between them) are actually marked on that map that @Cheizz posted. Same number as on map is marked also next to ski run and on every possible crossing, so in reality, it's basically same map as the one @Tony S posted. Only difference is, ski resort on map that Tony S posted has realistically 5km of ski runs, at most, (I know with all variants they probably market it as area with 500km of ski runs) while Sella Ronda area on map Cheizz posted has some 500+km of ski runs so scale is slightly different.
PS: As for food I definitely disagree with Cheizz... Alta Badia is worse place, probably in whole Italy, for food. Any other valley around there is way better option and have great food, but Alta Badia is really worse possible place to eat.
 

fatbob

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Chill.
I meant to say "trail maps in EUROPE..."
The trail maps of the 4 Sella Ronda areas also have their own resort on one side and the entire Sella Ronda on the back.

I just hope the trail maps are not the reason to pick one destination over another.


So they do get more detailed than the one you posted despite your assertion. Just out of curiosity I looked at the online individual "interactive" maps for DS and they looked utter garbage too.

I'd go fatmap if I was a less confident skier looking to learn about the area because they don't really do a good official job IMV.
 

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