Skis for maximizing your bump skiing practice time?

MissySki

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I’m a big fan of Deb Armstrong videos. I’m also a big fan of bump skiing.. though I’m not very good at it. I can get down most terrain, but continuous flow or looking good doing it? Not so much.. I enjoy figuring out how to get down technical terrain, more than zooming on groomers all day. Though some fun groomers to warm up in the morning are appreciated too. I mostly ski at Sunday River in Maine, get ~50 days per season, and spend as much time as I can in bumps and trees.

So I was watching this Deb Armstrong video, and they specifically call out that you can’t learn bumps well on 92 underfoot skis. And that’s me lol, I most often ski my beloved Blizzard Sheeva 9 which are in fact 92 underfoot. And while I do feel I’ve made some good strides (for me) in bumps the last handful of years, it just feels like I should have improved more by now. So I’m interested in demoing some narrower skis that might work better for bump skiing practice in New England. I also take lessons, I actually do the adult seasonal program at Sunday River so I ski with instructors much of the season.

Does anyone have recommendations for skis to add to this sort of demo list? And should I go shorter than my normal length as well? I’m 5’4”, 125lbs and usually like skis in the mid 160s for all mountain use.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts or ideas!

Video I’m referencing:
 

Zrxman01

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I love The Deb Armstrong videos!

Here are some close out Blizzards Cheyennes in 156 and 163cm for $250.00.
78 mm waist with a little tip and tail rise.
Similar to the much loved (I own a pair) Latigo but without the two sheets of metal).


These might be worth your consideration. One heck of a price!
 
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MissySki

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Can you just list what those are, for those of us exasperated with video as a quick way to convey basic factual info?
70s-low 80s underfoot, but not ridiculously stiff, and good for bumps not just groomers.

Sorry, I was just showing the video to reference the comments of 90s underfoot being too wide to learn bump skiing. They both say they are on 70 something underfoot skis in the video, but then don’t get into what characteristics to look for in a skinnier ski beyond the waist width. That’s why I’m hoping for some crowdsourcing help on what to check out. It’s not a category of ski that I’ve paid much attention to, so I don’t really know where to start.
 
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GregK

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Tony S

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70s-low 80s underfoot, but not ridiculously stiff, and good for bumps not just groomers.

Sorry, I was just showing the video to reference the comments of 90s underfoot being too wide to learn bump skiing. They both say they are on 70 something underfoot skis in the video, but then don’t get into what characteristics to look for in a skinnier ski beyond the waist width.
Ah. Got it. I thought you had a list of specific models.

Something around 160 would be good if you're normally on a 165+.

The Cheyennes were a good suggestion.

Several of us here are fans of the older Kästle FX 85 as an "easy button" bump ski. They can still be found cheap if you search hard. The 157 would probably be the right size. Just avoid the "HP" variant.

Another super easy bump ski from a couple years ago is the K2 Mindbender 88 Ti Alliance. (Yes, I tried it.)

People with experience on the longer lengths of the Fischer RC One 82 GT may know it as a fairly stiff ski, but my experience on the 166 was not that at all. I suspect that Fischer is making this ski with a huge variation in flex based on length. So probably my top suggestion for current (I think) model skis would be that one. See my thumbnail here.
 

François Pugh

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What I, as a long time carvaholic, have found works best in bumps is a ski that is much softer in longitudinal flex. A little less torsional strength is more forgiving, as is shorter, but as skill improves less torsion and shorter don't seem to benefit; softer longitudinal flex still does. Also find wider does NOT help. A 1 base 2 side tune helps. All above with reference to 68 mm race and near race skis tuned at 0.5, 3.
 
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LiquidFeet

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Dedicated bump skis are made for bump skiers who want to compete. The skis are made specifically to help them go fast and win races when they are skiing a direct line straight down a seeded bump run. Are you interested in skiing this way?

If you are, I have a pair I'd like to get rid of. They are old, but newly tuned with new bindings and plenty of edge left. Very shiny. Dragons on the topsheet. If you are interested I will go look at the specs.
 
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Philpug

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We talk about wide narrow skis and narrow wide skis, I would suggest a very narrow wide ski here. A ki that has elongated gradual early rise in the tip, this will help you get that tip up on top of the bump with ease, a softer balanced flex and a tail that can release, tapered, rounded but not a twin. Skis that come to mind are the fore mentioned Cheyenne/Black Pearl 78, IMHO one of the best for this, the Nordica Astral 78 is another.
 

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People with experience on the longer lengths of the Fischer RC One 82 GT may know it as a fairly stiff ski, but my experience on the 166 was not that at all. I suspect that Fischer is making this ski with a huge variation in flex based on length.
I like this suggestion too, while it is slightly stiffer, the shape is optimal.
 

silverback

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Brings back memories of how hard it was to sell these. Maybe they were “before their time”. 88s or 98s (black pearl) would have sold for double in no time. I guess people didn’t ski moguls back then. :huh:

 
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MissySki

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I love The Deb Armstrong videos!

Here are some close out Blizzards Cheyennes in 156 and 163cm for $250.00.
78 mm waist with a little tip and tail rise.
Similar to the much loved (I own a pair) Latigo but without the two sheets of metal).


These might be worth your consideration. One heck of a price!
Thank you, these actually sound like a really solid option for my purposes reading past overviews! I remember the name of this ski, but never got on them to demo. Does anyone know if they have morphed into one of the other skis in the lineup now out of curiosity? Definitely a great price here to try out without worry of not being able to demo.

Which size would I target here though? Most of my skis are somewhere in the mid 160s depending on the size offering of a model. The 156 sounds so short, but would that be the correct direction to go in for this type of ski and my intention for them?
 
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MissySki

MissySki

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We talk about wide narrow skis and narrow wide skis, I would suggest a very narrow wide ski here. A ki that has elongated gradual early rise in the tip, this will help you get that tip up on top of the bump with ease, a softer balanced flex and a tail that can release, tapered, rounded but not a twin. Skis that come to mind are the fore mentioned Cheyenne/Black Pearl 78, IMHO one of the best for this, the Nordica Astral 78 is another.

Would it now be the Nordica Wild Belle 78? I was looking at those recently because I went to a women’s ski night event at Wachusett on Friday and they had a female Nordica rep from Utah to give a talk. She went through the whole lineup, but she was in marketing and specifically said she wasn’t as up on the soecific technology and build of each ski. So I didn’t get into it, but was trying to decipher the differences in the 3 widths for the current lineup. I assume I will have access to demoing these at the early December demo day at Sunday River since Nordica is always there.
Thoughts on size between the 156 and 162 for me?
 

Zrxman01

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If you are used to mid 160s then a 163 with tip and tail rise. (And a 1 base 2 side tube) would be a good fit. If you can find the value Tyrolia AM 12 bindings you are money. Lastly get a pair of 2-4” poles to go with this set up.
 
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MissySki

MissySki

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Dedicated bump skis are made for bump skiers who want to compete. The skis are made specifically to help them go fast and win races when they are skiing a direct line straight down a seeded bump run. Are you interested in skiing this way?

If you are, I have a pair I'd like to get rid of. They are old, but newly tuned with new bindings and plenty of edge left. Very shiny. Dragons on the topsheet. If you are interested I will go look at the specs.
Haha oh lord no.. At 39 I don’t think I’m suddenly going to be speeding down the zipperline, especially with my pretty slow progress in bumps over the past handful of years. :ogbiggrin:

My goal is to develop more flow and some more speed by being able to keep going longer without shopping so much in bumps.. and I ski often in icy and questionable coverage bumps so I want that to apply to all trail conditions.
 

KingGrump

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Which size would I target here though? Most of my skis are somewhere in the mid 160s depending on the size offering of a model. The 156 sounds so short, but would that be the correct direction to go in for this type of ski and my intention for them?

Go with something mid to high 150.

We ski Taos. Tons of bumps. Most women here with your stats are on 157- 161. In that length, it is more sensitive to fore and aft balance adjustments. It will be less stable on the groomers at first. Until you get your fore and aft balance dialed in. Then it will be just as stable. Indian, not arrow.

My goal is to develop more flow and some more speed by being able to keep going longer without shopping so much in bumps.. and I ski often in icy and questionable coverage bumps so I want that to apply to all trail conditions.

If that is your goal. Come to the Taos gathering. A ski week will do wonders.
 

cantunamunch

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Dedicated bump skis are made for bump skiers who want to compete. The skis are made specifically to help them go fast and win races when they are skiing a direct line straight down a seeded bump run. Are you interested in skiing this way?

If you are, I have a pair I'd like to get rid of. They are old, but newly tuned with new bindings and plenty of edge left. Very shiny. Dragons on the topsheet. If you are interested I will go look at the specs.

Dragons? You mean like Volkl Dragonslayers? Ooooo

Or do you mean the lot-newer Kendos with the dragon topsheet?
 
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Zrxman01

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The more I think about it you being 5 ft 4”.
go with the shorter size (like king grump said).
163 cm is head height.
 

ilovepugs

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Haha oh lord no.. At 39 I don’t think I’m suddenly going to be speeding down the zipperline, especially with my pretty slow progress in bumps over the past handful of years. :ogbiggrin:

My goal is to develop more flow and some more speed by being able to keep going longer without shopping so much in bumps.. and I ski often in icy and questionable coverage bumps so I want that to apply to all trail conditions.
You should come ski the mogul clinic with me and @LiquidFeet at MRG — we’ve earmarked 2/17 for the clinic. Will call them about it soon to confirm. There’s one more pet-friendly guest room in my house available so Sookie can come.
 
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