Skis for maximizing your bump skiing practice time?

cantunamunch

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That's what the wax tallow iron is for.

FIFY :)

Your poles are too long.

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Skating pikes...I like it, but it means you have to get KG on what's effectively a groomer.
 
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Dougb

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Aren't you on Vists or Blossoms now? Were you looking for something softer?

I’m always window shopping! Good memory though. I’ve been on Vists the last couple of seasons. I lost weight though and this season I’m dropping down to a shorter AM77.

I’ve been keeping my eyes out for a cheap pair of used SL skis, or something like a Rossi Hero Elite ST or MT Ti. The Harts caught my eye, although they obviously are narrower in the tips and I think have a longer side cut than a SL ski. I think the Javelin was Hart’s SL.

Anyway, the F17 caught my eye. I don’t want to hijack the thread away from mogul skiing.
 

Tony S

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I’ve been keeping my eyes out for a cheap pair of used SL skis, or something like a Rossi Hero Elite ST or MT Ti. The Harts caught my eye, although they obviously are narrower in the tips and I think have a longer side cut than a SL ski. I think the Javelin was Hart’s SL.
Apples and oranges.
 

Seldomski

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Different skis will ski bumps in different ways. You can also ski the same ski different ways in the same set of bumps. There are a few universal-ish things though that can make things easier.

Narrower skis are easier somewhat because you can roll them faster edge to edge, but I think it has more to do with stance width. Very narrow stance in bumps makes the bumps much easier to ski. A narrower ski lets you move your feet close together without the tails/tips banging together. So it has more to do with the width of the tails/tips than the under foot width IMO. So check dimensions on what you ski now and try to get narrower, especially in the tails, than whatever is your preferred bump ski today. I don't like wide tailed skis in bumps because I end up stepping on the tails of my own skis.

Skiing moguls is really hard on skis. I'd suggest something with more metal and more durable and topsheets that can survive skis crossing each other and skis banging together sideways. The terrain will force them to clap together. It does for me anyway because I am still learning.

Stiffness- I have skied softer flexing skis in bumps but I don't like them. They feel unstable to me. I prefer a stiffer ski. The bumps will bend them, don't worry about that... Maybe if you are really just now tiptoeing into learning bumps a soft ski is good, but I find them to be boring in bumps and actually better on groomers.

Final opinion is you want a ski that can do drills on groomers but isn't super fun to ski on groomers. So a ski with tip/tail rocker and smidge of camber that is easy to smear and not always wanting to carve. Larger turn radius helps a bit. Helping more is taper in the tips and in the tails This ski can carve a groomer with the right input, but you will not really want to do a lot of it because it's not very fun to ski on a groomer and they are somewhat reluctant to hook up and willing to let go of turns. Basically I am describing my old kendos which were fabulous in bumps but a bit boring on groomers (still fun, just they were much funner in bumps). As a result, I naturally wanted to ski bumps more often because it was the most engaging thing to do with them.

As a counterpoint to the Kendos, I have been skiing mostly on the Fischer RC One 86 and these are very engaging to ski on groomers and in crud/chop on steeps. They are not as fun in bumps, but certainly competent there. They can ski them, but bumps feel like I am avoiding using the best attributes of the ski (ie easy to hook up and rail, fantastic edge hold, stability) since they are sort of detrimental things in skiing a direct line in bumps. So I find myself skiing fewer bumps simply because the ski is more thrilling in other terrain. They can do a direct line in bumps, but the skis are sort of asking, why are you doing this and not something else?
 

Dougb

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As a counterpoint to the Kendos, I have been skiing mostly on the Fischer RC One 86 and these are very engaging to ski on groomers and in crud/chop on steeps. They are not as fun in bumps, but certainly competent there. They can ski them, but bumps feel like I am avoiding using the best attributes of the ski (ie easy to hook up and rail, fantastic edge hold, stability) since they are sort of detrimental things in skiing a direct line in bumps. So I find myself skiing fewer bumps simply because the ski is more thrilling in other terrain. They can do a direct line in bumps, but the skis are sort of asking, why are you doing this and not something else?

Exactly my experience on the Fischers in the bumps. I was reminded of it this week at North Star.
 

Seldomski

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Begs the question ... did you find a bump line for them other than direct?
In steeps that are less skied (and usually skied with all mountain charger skis), the more widely spaced moguls where you can do some more GS like lines and pop off a bump and do more of a bank line, they are definitely fun in that type of terrain. Other strategy that plays more to the ski's strength is skiing only the tops with larger radius. So these are a good bank line ski.

Direct line, I feel like I have to get so far forward to purposely mute the performance of the tail of the ski. The tail has a lot of fun in this ski and it feels wrong to try to make the ski submit to a direct line.

YMMV, my2c,signed some dude on the internet, etc.
 
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