Slalom carving skis for a carving learner

Seldomski

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Lessons would be good. One thing that stuck out to me was the absence of pole plants. Do you normally ski without pole plants? They are a useful tool for providing rhythm and cue to get forward in the turn at the right time.

Is that slope you filmed on a blue or green? It looks a bit steep as a starting point. Speed hides a multitude of sins. The fore/aft balance adjustments and timing requirements are much reduced on flatter vs steeper terrain, so carving will be more attainable on a flatter pitch.
 

Tony S

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I'm going to assume that if the OP wants technique advice he will post in the Ski School forum.
 
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Grizz111

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Sorry, this is going to sound harsh.

I do like your mental attitude. :thumb: After looking at the video, I would say you need a more complete understanding of turn dynamics.
A lesson with a good instructor would move you much further along in your quest.
Skis are your least worries at this time.
Second this. The advice you need can sound more harsh than this post from Mr. Grump. People may step up and give it. With your grit and ambitious energy, you'll get there.

In short: you need some coaching on how to initiate a carved turn, and some help getting centered over your skis. You could probably also use a list of "do not do's". These are hard to get on your own. Most skiers need good eyes watching and providing immediate feedback until they "get it."
No no, this is exactly what I wanted in the first place. To somehow find the propper skis for the level that I'm skiing at right now. No hard feelings taken at all :)
But yeah, I'm a complete begginer in carving at the moment. I managed to get a feel for it, but I'm definitely lacking in proper form and technique.
Do you guys have a suggestion for the level or type of training that is best suited for me? Last time I had a coach was while I was still learning pizza skiing :ogbiggrin:
Rest of the stuff I'm mostly self learned, and now I'm usually moslty watching videos about carving with tips that I try to focus on when I go skiing. But the issue is that I can't see myself, so I agree, good coaching would help a lot!

Sensible posts above.

The good news here is that the OP will probably be thrilled with any of a number of narrow-ish groomer-ish ski models, provided they are full of life and frequently tuned - i.e., not 15 years old. They all ski basic carved turns reasonably well.

@Grizz111 what is your current "daily driver" ski? Make, model, year, length, most recent full tune-up?
Don't have any skiis or boots that I own currently. Like I said, I haven't skied for the last 10-11 years at all. After that long pause, the first time I skied was last year in march for 2 days and after that this year in December for 2 days and now last weekend for 3 days. The plan is to continue with skiing every or every other weekend. Basically whenever I manage to go.
All the skis and boots that I used after the pause were from rental. Since I'm planning to go skiing much more often now I want to buy both skis and the boots in the next few days.

Lessons would be good. One thing that stuck out to me was the absence of pole plants. Do you normally ski without pole plants? They are a useful tool for providing rhythm and cue to get forward in the turn at the right time.

Is that slope you filmed on a blue or green? It looks a bit steep as a starting point. Speed hides a multitude of sins. The fore/aft balance adjustments and timing requirements are much reduced on flatter vs steeper terrain, so carving will be more attainable on a flatter pitch.
It's a short red run in the video. I haven't really used poles that much sadly :/
 

Seldomski

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All the skis and boots that I used after the pause were from rental. Since I'm planning to go skiing much more often now I want to buy both skis and the boots in the next few days.
Getting proper fitting ski boots will definitely help tremendously and likely be transformative for your skiing. So I'd suggest finding a good 'boot fitter' be top of your priority list. I have no idea who is good in your profile location 'Croatia.'

With a good boot, you will be able to make the fine motions required for carving and ski pain free. With a sloppy fit boot, it will be hard to control the ski well enough. Edit to add: And that sloppy fit may cause you pain as well.
 
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Grizz111

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Getting proper fitting ski boots will definitely help tremendously and likely be transformative for your skiing. So I'd suggest finding a good 'boot fitter' be top of your priority list. I have no idea who is good in your profile location 'Croatia.'

With a good boot, you will be able to make the fine motions required for carving and ski pain free. With a sloppy fit boot, it will be hard to control the ski well enough.
Yup, no issue there, I've got great ski shop near me that does custom fit boots. From the comments in the thread I should be looking for 120-130 flex index? I'm open to suggestions regarding both skis and shoes ogsmile
 

Jilly

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I concur with the rest about a good lesson(s). The Redster's will reward a better stance. Their sweet spot is small.

I will give you what one of my instructors told me....learn to trust your edges!
 

dbostedo

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From the comments in the thread I should be looking for 120-130 flex index?
No... you should get the flex that a good boot fitter says is appropriate. Try to go in with no preconceived notions, and be very upfront about your current skiing and goals. Don't worry about brand or flex or color or anything else except fit and fit for your skiing. Boots are inordinately more important than skis, for carving and any other type of skiing.
 

Seldomski

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No... you should get the flex that a good boot fitter says is appropriate. Try to go in with no preconceived notions, and be very upfront about your current skiing and goals. Don't worry about brand or flex or color or anything else except fit and fit for your skiing. Boots are inordinately more important than skis, for carving and any other type of skiing.
Agree with all of this.

You can show him/her your current skiing videos from this thread. Also, write down now what boots you had rented for that skiing - brand, model, flex #, and size, as well as any notes on where they were loose or too tight. All of that info may be useful to the fitter.

Tell the fitter how many days a season you plan to ski going forward and your goals.
 

LiquidFeet

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Getting proper fitting ski boots will definitely help tremendously and likely be transformative for your skiing. So I'd suggest finding a good 'boot fitter' be top of your priority list. I have no idea who is good in your profile location 'Croatia.'

With a good boot, you will be able to make the fine motions required for carving and ski pain free. With a sloppy fit boot, it will be hard to control the ski well enough.
@Grizz111, as you start shopping, BOOTS come first. Boots are your connection to the skis. If the boot fit is sloppy, your control over your skis will be sloppy. Sloppy control over skis means sloppy turns. Everyone here will tell you this. See the posts above.

We know boots are not exciting to buy, and skis are, but boots are the most important purchase you will make. Not skis. Sorry, but boots are incredibly easy to get wrong, and the wasted money spent on badly fitted boots and time wasted in them is painful. Many of us have gone through this in the past. Listen to the hive.

You may be like most and have to learn the hard way (buying boots that don't fit and skiing in them for years, frustrated with your lack of progress, then buying more boots (that don't fit) and skiing in them for years, before figuring out poor fitting boots are the reason you are not improving your skiing and that you are unqualified to figure out what boot-fit should feel like.

Find a great bootfitter and do what the bootfitter says to do. Go with absolutely no preconceptions. Show your videos. Make sure you are working with a real bootfitter with experience and brains, not a hack.

Ask here in a separate thread for recommendations for a bootfitter near you. Someone will know. Bring your money when you go. And don't look back. Just plunk down the money and reserve looking for bargains for when you buy skis, not boots. Spend your savings on your boots, if you care about your skiing.

** DO NOT call ski boots "shoes." No.
 
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oldschoolskier

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Boots are important, very snug yet comfortable fit is likely the best way to describe it, a good fitter will get you there. Unless you have some serious medical deformities, start with a basic set up, ski a bit and with a good instructor determine if further boot tuning is needed.

That said, a SL ski (particularly a race SL, is extremely predicable). No matter what you do if you put it on edge it will turn, give it correct input with authority hang on. As for tune a 1/3 or 0.7/3 should be fine (no more, no less)

Now for learning to ski, balance is important, start with side slips and the various 360 drills, while you learn your other skills. The drills are strictly for balance and edge feel (I still do about a minute or two each and every time out and about 5-10 minutes first day of the season to remind my brain of skiing balance vs walking balance).

Skills....these are the technique you use to ski, the better you get the more skills you have, the difference between good and great skills is balance (the simple drills).
 

Ogg

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@LiquidFeet when English is not your native language...have a heart..
I just figured the word for boot and shoe in his native language was probably the same or very close. I've seen the same thing posted by others from Europe who were experienced skiers who I assumed knew the proper terminology in their native language.
 
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Grizz111

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Yup, shoe is more like a general footwear term over here and a boot is a subset of shoes. All boots are shoes, but not all shoes are boots :ogbiggrin:
But for ski boots we have a specific word "Pancerica". I'm guessing it's similar case with other European languages.

Anyways, thanks a lot for the help everyone! I'll try to get appointment with a fitter during the week. The shop I'm planning to go to seems really professional. The process includes consultations, talking about skill, previous experience, previous boots etc. After that they put you on some ski simulator for a while to see if there are some pressure points. Then they do custom fitting if needed (vacuum fit, heat moulding etc. depending on the boot manufacturer).

I'll handle the skis after that, those are still a mystery what to actually pick. I'm definitely certain I want something that will help with learning carving and that seems to be some variation of pure slalom ski. But I'm not sure what stiffness and expertise level to go for. Judging from the comments, skis that I used in last couple of weeks redster s9, fischer SC and SL might be advanced for me?
 

LiquidFeet

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Yup, shoe is more like a general footwear term over here and a boot is a subset of shoes. All boots are shoes, but not all shoes are boots :ogbiggrin:
But for ski boots we have a specific word "Pancerica". I'm guessing it's similar case with other European languages.

Anyways, thanks a lot for the help everyone! I'll try to get appointment with a fitter during the week. The shop I'm planning to go to seems really professional. The process includes consultations, talking about skill, previous experience, previous boots etc. After that they put you on some ski simulator for a while to see if there are some pressure points. Then they do custom fitting if needed (vacuum fit, heat moulding etc. depending on the boot manufacturer).

I'll handle the skis after that, those are still a mystery what to actually pick. I'm definitely certain I want something that will help with learning carving and that seems to be some variation of pure slalom ski. But I'm not sure what stiffness and expertise level to go for. Judging from the comments, skis that I used in last couple of weeks redster s9, fischer SC and SL might be advanced for me?
Sounds like a good plan. Report back!
 

oldschoolskier

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Yup, shoe is more like a general footwear term over here and a boot is a subset of shoes. All boots are shoes, but not all shoes are boots :ogbiggrin:
But for ski boots we have a specific word "Pancerica". I'm guessing it's similar case with other European languages.

Anyways, thanks a lot for the help everyone! I'll try to get appointment with a fitter during the week. The shop I'm planning to go to seems really professional. The process includes consultations, talking about skill, previous experience, previous boots etc. After that they put you on some ski simulator for a while to see if there are some pressure points. Then they do custom fitting if needed (vacuum fit, heat moulding etc. depending on the boot manufacturer).

I'll handle the skis after that, those are still a mystery what to actually pick. I'm definitely certain I want something that will help with learning carving and that seems to be some variation of pure slalom ski. But I'm not sure what stiffness and expertise level to go for. Judging from the comments, skis that I used in last couple of weeks redster s9, fischer SC and SL might be advanced for me?
SL's are a funny beast, the civilian rated version tend to be harder to ski because they are/cabln be less consistent. The hardcore race versions are very predictable, for mere mortals (specially those learning) ensure you select on the softer side, Stiff SL race skis could be a little daunting. Read some of @ScotsSkier older posts about this or give him a shout out. @Primoz would be another good choice to follow. Years ago Rossi/Dynastar had more forgiving feel, don't know currently as it does change depending on what manufacturers aim for.
 

KingGrump

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A good carved turn is more about bending the ski rather than just riding the side cut.

I usually ski Southern Vermont (SVT) during early season before heading out west in search of softer snow and bigger hills. SVT is known for their world famous New England pack powder, aka ice. We have a decent collection of hard snow oriented skis. Mainly Atomic FIS SLs and GS skis. This is what one of our typical group outing looks like.

1641863606369.png

That is 5 pairs of Atomic FIS SLs and a pair of Blossom AM85. The presence of the Blossom was intentional rather than due to a dearth of SLs at the house.
One of the ladies in the group was experiencing a plateau in her technical advancement. She was having issues bending her FIS SL ski during low speed maneuvers. I suggested she tried a softer pair of skis in order to break through the wall in front of her. It worked well for the intended purposes. She turns were much rounder at low speed. She was able to translate that experience to her SLs.

Moral of the story is don't need the baddest ski on the hill to learn to carve. Sometimes a softer ski will more than suffice. Often it is actually a better learning tool.

Learning to carve is not about going fast. Speed hides all sorts of sins.

Think slow, ski slower.
When you can do that. Take the next step.
Ski fast, feel slow.

Good luck with your journey.
 

GB_Ski

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Try Head I-magnum or E-magnum. They are one of the best technical skis out there and don’t require speed to come alive.
 
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Grizz111

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Alright, boots are done, it was definitely fun. Went to a shop, got feet measurement and custom insoles. The boots are Fischer RC4 The Curv GT 120 flex index.
After the next skiing in case there are some pressure points or loos spots, they will get fitted. In general they are both tighter, more comfortable and a lot lighter compared to rental ones.

So what remains are the skis. I talked a bit with the dude in the shop, his rough recommendation was Fischer Curv DTX 164 cm.

Some pics of the process and measurements in case anyone is interested :ogbiggrin:
IMG_4533 (1).jpeg

IMG_4534 (1).jpeg

IMG_4536 (1).jpeg
 
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