Slide With Respect Survey Launch

Jerez

Making fresh tracks
Skier
Joined
Nov 25, 2015
Posts
2,399
Location
New Mexico
I had difficulty with this question too. I put Not Sure.

I have definitely been reckless by pushing the edge if my ability and hope to again. Riding that edge in the flow is one of the joys of skiing. I have suffered the consequences of having misjudged that fine line too. :philgoat:

But I have only been reckless in pushing it when I have a clear path and am only a danger to myself.
 

scott43

So much better than a pro
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
10,326
Location
Great White North
As ridiculous as this sounds, it's not an unreasonable thought. I mean, we go as fast as a vehicle out there. Throw in the chaos of no lanes, no stop signs, and a lot of egos and adrenalin, and it's no wonder people collide and even die.
By the grace of God... Or spaghetti Monster.. whatever..
 

Tricia

The Velvet Hammer
Admin
SkiTalk Tester
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Nov 1, 2015
Posts
23,282
Location
Tahoe
Done!
 

James

Out There
Instructor
Joined
Dec 2, 2015
Posts
19,269
… I mean, we go as fast as a vehicle out there. Throw in the chaos of no lanes, no stop signs, and a lot of egos and adrenalin, and it's no wonder people collide and even die.
And people talk about having flying cars as if it’s nirvana…
 

kayco53

Getting on the lift
Skier
Joined
Jul 12, 2017
Posts
157
Location
BC Canada
Most people are decent and considerate of others to the extent they will self-sacrifice often when someone has screwed up or mitigate another's poor decision making themselves. Probably the stats of people on this board when it comes to serious injury collisions bears it out. Of course the amount of ski days people here collectively have under their belts unfortunately means some of those collisions will have been injury causing.

I think the point is the aggregate of collisions (or very near misses) is still too high for anyone in the industry to be complacent. You're only as safe as the clown coming down the slope next no matter how skilled you are so if you slow for traffic........
I could not agree more. Somebody ripping down a slope and not realizing that the new skier is crossing back and forth or unpredictable in their turns plows into them. I have felt people almost brush me and we stick out. Most avoid us. That is one of the reasons I don't like earbuds. I want to ear them coming.
 

robertc3

Getting off the lift
Skier
Joined
Sep 12, 2017
Posts
301
Location
Kenmore, WA
I have definitely been reckless by pushing the edge if my ability and hope to again. Riding that edge in the flow is one of the joys of skiing. I have suffered the consequences of having misjudged that fine line too. :philgoat:

But I have only been reckless in pushing it when I have a clear path and am only a danger to myself.
I don't view pushing your abilities in the correct location and situation as reckless. Reckless means doing something with little or no regard for the consequences of the action. Hitting a big jump with a landing you have scouted which is clear of skier traffic is fine, hitting a big jump with a blind landing, no spotter, on an active trail is reckless. Ripping groomers at 50+mph when you have the hill to yourself is fine, doing the same on the runout of a blue/black run into a beginner area is reckless.
Push your limits @Jerez.
 

mikel

Out on the slopes
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Joined
Jul 3, 2016
Posts
1,578

Slemers

Getting off the lift
Skier
Joined
Jan 31, 2021
Posts
249
Location
PNW
Who hasn't been reckless? Plenty of hold my beer stuff since age 12.. but even that "just one more run" when your legs are toast could be considered reckless.
The only time I fell and required medical attention afterwards was after "Just one more run"
 

crgildart

Gravity Slave
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
13,711
Location
The Bull City
How much of The Skier's Code is learned from formal ski lessons and reading resort signage versus tribal knowledge of friends and family.. and perhaps a couple strangers calling us out??
 

tch

What do I know; I'm just some guy on the internet.
Skier
Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Posts
1,258
Location
New England
Ummm…actually I’d ask how much of the Code should be already be internalized via common frickin’ sense and a healthy respect for others….
 

fatbob

Not responding
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
5,060
Ummm…actually I’d ask how much of the Code should be already be internalized via common frickin’ sense and a healthy respect for others….
Unpossible.

Even here where you have a relatively large proportion of experienced and safe skiers you'll get violent disagreement over application of the code in any Red v Gray analysis. Last time around we seemed to have all sorts of esoteric interpretation of what "ahead" meant which made absolutely no sense to me as a practical means of ensuring safety.

If you left it to common sense then you'd have lots of people trying to apply traffic rules re lanes as that's the environment in which most people are used to multi-object collision avoidance at speed. Then there's the kinda rule of the jungle which would basically give the alphas priority over the betas by virtue of their assertiveness and less giving a damn about others.
 

4ster

Just because you can doesn’t mean you should!
Instructor
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
5,487
Location
Sierra & Wasatch
How much of The Skier's Code is learned from formal ski lessons and reading resort signage versus tribal knowledge of friends and family.. and perhaps a couple strangers calling us out??
Considering only about 10% of people take lessons, I would say it’s probably less than that since not every instructor specifically covers the responsibility code even though they are trained to, and should.
I always felt the most effective campaign was when the code was printed on recyclable napkins at resorts.
 

Posaune

sliding
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Joined
Mar 26, 2016
Posts
1,696
Location
Bellingham, WA
I always felt the most effective campaign was when the code was printed on recyclable napkins at resorts.
The most effective campaign for me was when they put one of the points of the code on a sign attached to each chair pole of a lift, as long as there were enough poles to get to each point. You saw them again and again during your ski day, reinforcing the code. I saw this at several places in the 60s and 70s but have not noticed it in years since.
 

fatbob

Not responding
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
5,060
@Posaune

That's valuable ad space the resort would be wasting on something as trivial as skier safety! Though I had to laugh at Fernie where I rode a lift where the lead ins were so long and ponderous I wasn't even looking when I got the the final sign where the brand did its big reveal.
 

Posaune

sliding
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Joined
Mar 26, 2016
Posts
1,696
Location
Bellingham, WA
@Posaune

That's valuable ad space the resort would be wasting on something as trivial as skier safety! Though I had to laugh at Fernie where I rode a lift where the lead ins were so long and ponderous I wasn't even looking when I got the the final sign where the brand did its big reveal.
I don't recall ever seeing ads either. The poles around here are bare.
 

crgildart

Gravity Slave
Skier
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
13,711
Location
The Bull City
Considering only about 10% of people take lessons, I would say it’s probably less than that since not every instructor specifically covers the responsibility code even though they are trained to, and should.
I always felt the most effective campaign was when the code was printed on recyclable napkins at resorts.
I can remember my first day at a real ski resort in awe of the infrastructure and happenings. I already mostly knew how to ski well enough to navigate the tiny place.. Yet, still I was kind of in shock.

When I taught beginners they were mostly similar deer in the headlights only they didn't have the back yard and farm hill skiing I had on my first day. Most of them were looking all around, some worried about getting hurt but also wanting to learn to keep up with family. friends, significant other, etc.. Beyond the basic survival of hot to turn, stop, and ride the lift, the aesthetics of skiers code and other etiquette went right past them with little chance of sinking in.

Now, if they were told there would be a test on those rules BEFORE they were allowed to ride lifts to blue or black terrain where collisions are more devastating it would probably get more attention..
 

Sibhusky

Whitefish, MT
Skier
Joined
Oct 26, 2016
Posts
4,036
Location
Whitefish, MT
The most effective campaign for me was when they put one of the points of the code on a sign attached to each chair pole of a lift, as long as there were enough poles to get to each point. You saw them again and again during your ski day, reinforcing the code. I saw this at several places in the 60s and 70s but have not noticed it in years since.
I know they have some of that here on chair 6. (Sort of a beginners lift, but most people ride it at some point.) I think it may also be on chair 1? Not a ton of ads here, thank goodness.
 

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