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Texas couple sue Jackson Hole Mountain resort…

dovski

Waxing my skis and praying for snow
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Whenever I see a claim for loss of consortium, I automatically assume the suit is BS, regardless of any other merits.
In theory anyone who has a spouse who makes good use of their Ikon or EPIC pass without them in theory could sue for loss of consortium lol :roflmao:

Joking aside how you fall as opposed to how fast you fall makes all the difference in terms of injuries. During my trip to Jackson Hole I was skiing down a groomer (at exactly 36.7 MPH according to my slopes app) and got torpedoed from behind by another skier. I went down pretty hard but slid a few hundred feet in a way where my skis did not release and my legs did not twist. All I had to show for the fall were a couple bruises on my chest and a soar shoulder the next day. Was up and skiing within a minute or two with no pain or issues - super lucky. Had another instance where a beginner snowboard crashed into me on a more advanced hill. I was standing still and he was not going that fast. I fell slowly in a weird way and tore a calf muscle. My buddies wife just tore her ACL while stopping to enter a lift line.

My only point in sharing all this is that we do not know what caused the binding to fail or how she fell. If the binding was faulty then the rental shop has some liability. If the skier damaged the binding and then it failed that's a different story. Details like how far they slid and how high the binding flew in the air don't really matter much, the only things that really do are why the binding failed and if that binding failure caused the plaintiffs injuries.
 

Philpug

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No, the binding did according to the report. The accuracy of the report is certainly questionable.
Thank you, I now see that, re reading it multiple times. Not sure how I missed that part. I am still not sure how it had that momentum on the second turn.
 

Itinerant skier

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One of the worst slides I’ve ever taken was when I wasn’t going that fast, although the trail was fairly steep.

I was skiing Cannon’s Avalanche trail and my skis just stopped. No clue what happened, but I double ejected, landed on my tush and slid a few hundred vertical feet. Conditions were probably standard New England - ie, firm.

Point being…. You don’t have to be skiing that fast to go for a long slide. However, getting something - a ski, a human - 10-15 feet vertically off the ground seems implausible. Even 10-15 feet horizontally seems difficult to achieve. I’ve witnessed a lot of crashes…. Can’t say I’ve ever seen “air time” like they’re insinuating.

But a long slide even at moderate speed I can believe.
I've seen such air time. Just a couple weeks ago in fact. True Grit at Waterville, which is a Double Black but it's Waterville, so like a single black at Cannon. Guy ahead of me caught an edge and bit it hard. One ski flew straight up into the air , easily 10 feet. and came down so hard that it stuck straight up out of the snow. The guy just kept rolling and rolling.
 

jt10000

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Don't rely on someone else for your safety. Check your equipment. I do an inspection of my gear every time I go. Still shit happens.
Not clear to me how someone new to the sport could inspect equipment effectively other than perhaps spotting blatant cranks or disconnected stuff. I'm not even sure that I could.

So I'm curious what your inspection entails. Do you have a checklist or something you can share?
 

François Pugh

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Not clear to me how someone new to the sport could inspect equipment effectively other than perhaps spotting blatant cranks or disconnected stuff. I'm not even sure that I could.

So I'm curious what your inspection entails. Do you have a checklist or something you can share?
They were not new to the sport, though they may have been new to easily removable bindings on a rental track.
 

givethepigeye

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Thank you, I now see that, re reading it multiple times. Not sure how I missed that part. I am still not sure how it had that momentum on the second turn.
People sometimes actually go straight for a while to build speed before putting their skis up on edge. That run is the perfect place to do so.
 

skix

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...

Again, knowing that trail, sliding 300-400 feet from ski releasing on the second turn?

Just trying to be a internet detective.
My guess that it was a demo ski and the demo binding came off of the track.

That's how mine failed. Atomic demo binding. The heel piece sat in a metal track but the heel piece itself had plastic flanges that slid in the track. I was in a turn and hit a bare patch which caused a lateral force that caused the plastic to break and send the heel piece flying out of the track. I turned onto my belly to self arrest but still ended up a long way from the initial crash. Vid available on request. Here is the binding heel piece with broken side facing the camera...

IMG_20230319_094957988.jpg
 

Wendy

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I had a system binding fail many years ago, while skiing at a slow to moderate speed on a blue run at Killington. The binding just shattered; blew apart (on a 2-year-old ski). I came out of the ski, landed head first, and ended up with a nasty concussion that kept me out of work for a few days. The binding was in shards all over the hill. When I took the skis and pieces of broken binding into the shop when I got home, no one could ascertain what happened to make it blow apart like that. Ski was a K2 One Luv with Marker system binding.
 

scott43

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Not clear to me how someone new to the sport could inspect equipment effectively other than perhaps spotting blatant cranks or disconnected stuff. I'm not even sure that I could.

So I'm curious what your inspection entails. Do you have a checklist or something you can share?
it's interesting, truckers here are responsible for their rig. They may have a clue but tell me how many fleet truckers can figure out if their rig needs front end with from a walk around. Where is the line between paying for professional work and doing it yourself? You guys DIN checking your bindings after the shop does it?
 

slowrider

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A professional driver can see worn/ damaged suspension. Tire wear also is a sign of problems. Driving the truck is another way. That said. You can not see internal damage as this happened after a VI.

071200_082001.jpg
 
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bbinder

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I fell the other day while putting on my skis after a break. Fell down so fast and hard that I bruised my shoulder badly. Now it has been two days without skiing. I maintain that the snow was too slippery. Searching for a lawyer to take my case.
 

scott43

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A professional driver can see worn/ damaged suspension. Tire wear also is a sign of problems. Driving the truck is another way. That said. You can not see internal damage as this happened after a VI. View attachment 197326
Yeah and they're professional drivers. Also, they flip so many different trailers, I think it's a bit much for most drivers to be honest.
 

slowrider

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The industry went in the toilet sometime ago. If you can't keep the shiny side up you have no business behind the wheel.
 

Wilhelmson

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This is what juries are for.
Since we are assuming, I would assume that these were demo skis, not crappy rentals.
My kid broke an demo binding when he was 11. Pull the toe off a demo and look at the tiny pawl. All it takes is a 100 lb person to jump a cliff and land on a stump. Those demos probably had seen 100 days at JH. I think demo bindings are safe. My kids ski them. Things break. Maybe better yet take up knitting and btw don’t run a ski resort if you don’t like being sued.
 

Pat AKA mustski

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You guys DIN checking your bindings after the shop does it?
Yes. Because once the tech turned it the wrong way and set me up at 9. I usually set at 5.
I fell the other day while putting on my skis after a break. Fell down so fast and hard that I bruised my shoulder badly. Now it has been two days without skiing. I maintain that the snow was too slippery. Searching for a lawyer to take my case.
I have no doubt that you can find one to take the case! If you have a problem in Massachusetts, come to California.
 

Wilhelmson

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I fell the other day while putting on my skis after a break. Fell down so fast and hard that I bruised my shoulder badly. Now it has been two days without skiing. I maintain that the snow was too slippery. Searching for a lawyer to take my case.
Otoh if you had been hit by a 7 year old while taking a selfie we would all have your back. Make that a 7 year old wearing a Cowboys jersey. Omfg you would be rich.
 

Wilhelmson

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Of being American
One thing is for sure you can’t make this stuff up.

Quite the story here.

Sex lies and ski chalets worthy of a Netflix series

This one is actually very sad.

The lawsuit said the exchange program and the Vanhorns were negligent "in safeguarding Niclas by exposing Niclas to unnecessary and unreasonably risky behavior such as permitting him to ski in inclement weather alone."
 

silverback

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Thank you, I now see that, re reading it multiple times. Not sure how I missed that part. I am still not sure how it had that momentum on the second turn.
Read it one more time. ;)
It was her 4th turn, not her 2nd. It was her second left-footer. On a slope firm enough for that long slide, you can build plenty of speed by your 4th turn.
 

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