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surfsnowgirl

Instructor
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May 12, 2016
Posts
5,945
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Magic Mountain, Vermont
Here's the whole blog post.

They say the SR is lighter, turns easier and has different sizing.


The Stormrider 95 recieves the same new core as the 88, with a tweaked shape and mount point. The mount point moves a bit further towards the tips (we haven’t gotten an exact measurement yet), for a slightly more progressive feel. Knowing Stockli, this won’t be as centered as your Faction Mana or Armada ARV, but it’s safe to assume the skis will feel a bit more intuitive and easier to intiate turns than the more traditional mount point they’ve kept historically. Stockli changes the size run on the 95, with 6cm increments compared to the 9cm seen on the 88 and 102.

My 95s are a couple years old and turn ridiculously easy. Mine are 166cm so I guess 170 it is.

I wanted to buy another SR 95 to keep at Bromley. Ski essentials has a '23 demo layout for sale. Think that's my plan.
 

Jim McDonald

愛スキー
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Joined
Nov 15, 2015
Posts
2,101
Location
Tokyo
I speak very little Japanese but what this gentleman said at 1:30 in my ears sounded like: You'd be a damn idiot not to buy these for the coming season.

Yeah,Tony, you don't speak much Japanese, at all. :(
 

Tony Storaro

Glorified Tobogganer
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Mar 2, 2020
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Europe
I speak very little Japanese but what this gentleman said at 1:30 in my ears sounded like: You'd be a damn idiot not to buy these for the coming season.

Yeah,Tony, you don't speak much Japanese, at all. :(

Ohayo gozaymasu to you too… :roflmao:
 

LindseyB

Stöckli
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Joined
Jan 14, 2019
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404
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SLC
Here's the whole blog post.

They say the SR is lighter, turns easier and has different sizing.


The Stormrider 95 recieves the same new core as the 88, with a tweaked shape and mount point. The mount point moves a bit further towards the tips (we haven’t gotten an exact measurement yet), for a slightly more progressive feel. Knowing Stockli, this won’t be as centered as your Faction Mana or Armada ARV, but it’s safe to assume the skis will feel a bit more intuitive and easier to intiate turns than the more traditional mount point they’ve kept historically. Stockli changes the size run on the 95, with 6cm increments compared to the 9cm seen on the 88 and 102.

My 95s are a couple years old and turn ridiculously easy. Mine are 166cm so I guess 170 it is.

I wanted to buy another SR 95 to keep at Bromley. Ski essentials has a '23 demo layout for sale. Think that's my plan.
The core is the same.

The new SR 95 is not lighter. The new SR88 is.

The SR95 in 175 was 1780 grams with a metal tail insert.
The New SR95 in 176 is 1776 grams with a none metal tail insert.

Same core as before and same effective weight.

The core height of the SR88 is lowered and that is why the SR88 is 100 grams lighter for next year. (23/24)
SR88 in 175 was 1775
SR88 in 17 is now 1675
 

LindseyB

Stöckli
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In comparison to the old SR95s, the new SR95s ski 2cm shorter.

Since the tail is lengthened by 2cm, the running length of the 176 is actually equivalent to a 174 in comparison to the old SR95 @ 175.

So the
170 skis like 168
176 skis like 174
182 skis like 180
188 skis like 186

The lengthened tail helps release the turn in 3D snow without interfering with the ski in 2D snow.
 

TheArchitect

Working to improve all the time
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Dec 4, 2016
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3,435
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Metrowest Boston
THE SR 95 is not "more lighterer". The weight of the 95 is the same as previous iterations. The size run is different though.

Sizing
170,176,182,188.
Is the size run of the SR88 the same as last year? Also, has the mount point been moved forward on the 88 as well (and by how much)?
 

surfsnowgirl

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Posts
5,945
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Magic Mountain, Vermont
In comparison to the old SR95s, the new SR95s ski 2cm shorter.

Since the tail is lengthened by 2cm, the running length of the 176 is actually equivalent to a 174 in comparison to the old SR95 @ 175.

So the
170 skis like 168
176 skis like 174
182 skis like 180
188 skis like 186

The lengthened tail helps release the turn in 3D snow without interfering with the ski in 2D snow.

I know the Nela 88 is the "new" model of my SR motion 85s but based on our email's should I still be looking at the SR 88. Feel free and email me if that's easier.
 

Peter P

Booting up
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Nov 9, 2019
Posts
74
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Park City, UT
Some thoughts on the FIS SL after skiing them this season as a major part of the quiver…

For context, I am a recovering Atomic race room ski junkie (summertime raids on WC athlete quivers / wintertime recreational skiing of said bounty with the occasional run at glory in the local Masters scene).

My primary point of reference is the 165 cm FIS Redster S9. Set-up: X20 binding / solid plate / running .5/4 bevels. I have >1M vertical ft on this set-up over the past 3 seasons.

My initial reaction to the Stöckli FIS SL in early season skiing was pure unadulterated enthusiasm. I had never skied a ski that blended so much power with so much playfulness. I stand by this impression, although as I have spent more time on the ski, there are some important nuances.

Side-cut - this ski is 2.0 mm wider in the tip, 1.5mm narrower in the waist, and 2.5 mm wider in the tail than it’s S9 counterpart. On paper, the differential in turn radius is minute at (.1m); but experientially the Stöckli’s preferred radius is MUCH shorter than the Redster. The Stöckli can snap off turns that radius-wise are unthinkable on the Redster. On the other-hand, the Stöckli is quite resistant to being skied at the occasional GS-radius turn length, which the Redster does with aplomb. This smaller radius of the Stockli is very confidence-inspiring when skiing gates, as one can arc through even the most desperate of recovery-turns.

Longitudinal Stiffness - this ski shares some heritage with the other Stöckli skis that I have sampled with regards to longitudinal stiffness, as there is a distinct differential between tip and tail stiffness with the tips being softer than the tail. This leads to an ease of turn initiation that is unique in this class of ski. This aspect makes pre-fall line engagement a breeze at surprisingly low speeds, and allows a level of precision/control in the Redster requires higher speeds and higher edge angles to replicate.

The Stöckli tails are not only comparatively stiff in relation to the tips, but on an absolute scale seem much stiffer than the Redster’s. In turn, the Stöckli delivers an extraordinary amount of power coming out of a turn, but need to be fully and rather intentionally flexed in order to work their magic. (I skied two full days until I first accessed the full strength of the tail quite by accident, and had to stop to take my heart out of my throat) In combination, this fore-aft differential in longitudinal stiffness invites a pronounced “fore-to-aft” migration of the optimal balance point on the ski during a turn. This takes some adaptation when transitioning from a ski like the Redster that seems to have a comparatively narrow and more neutral balance point; but once mastered opens up a FUN game of nuance between pressure strength and timing. This wider range of balance makes it delightful in variable snow conditions, or during ‘recovery-mode’ after badly mis-judging a cross-rut on a race course. It is particularly delightful in full-crud conditions with a firm base. The edges will hold for days underneath the crud, while the wide balance range will allows you to work though the ‘potato-sack thud’ sensation of incoming crud-chunks.

Torsional-Stiffness - If the fore-foot of the SL “lacks” comparative longitudinal-stiffness to the Redster, it is clearly “superior” in the category of torsional stiffness. In fact, it is the combination of a certain longitudinal suppleness and torsional rigidity in the fore-foot that is the hallmark of this ski, and it’s most subtle nuance. The ease of turn initiation, followed by a ‘dagger-on-ice’ edge hold that doesn’t deteriorate with pressure or speed, and is equal parts counterintuitive and mind-blowing. Something that flexes so easily shouldn’t possibly be able to hold so firmly, but it does it VERY WELL. This translates into an experience that builds confidence in high edge angles on steep terrain, and likewise in ripping lightening-fast transitions on ice. That outside- edge will be there sooner than you expect and cannot be overpowered torsionally. This aspect of the ski develops quite a “hero-complex” over time and is highly addicting.

The nuance here is that the ski rewards ‘good’ technique and punishes ‘bad’ technique. Edge engagement on the new turning ski above the fall-line is what these skis seem to be built for, while turn initiation in or after the fall-line generates a distinct ‘pumping-the-brakes’ sensation and has the tendency to scrub ALOT of speed very quickly. For me, this tendency is more pronounced in steep/icy terrain when technique begins to fall apart.

Rebound/Feedback - In sharing the heritage of the rest of the Stockli line, there is a secret in the core of the ski that is hard to describe but is evident in a certain feeling underfoot; particularly in the sensations felt when flexing and unflexing the ski. The Stöckli responds to nuances in the pressure phase of a turn (timing, speed, & angle) that are unobservable in the Redster. The active feedback from the ski during each phase of the turn creates a form of sensory-driven situational awareness that borders on black magic. The Redsters feel blunt in comparison, and when transitioning from the Stöckli to the Redster, I find myself grasping for supplemental visual and auditory cues to compensate for the lack of sensory input from the the ski.

In totality, I absolutely love the SL, and see many more pairs being added to the quiver; albeit there are rare applications where I may still occasionally reach for the Redsters.
Thanks for the great post. I need some advice. I am 5'11" 180lbs. I love Nastar and race at Deer Valley where the course is a hybrid between SL and GS ... significantly tilting toward SL ... I had been using Stockli WRT 172 and doing fairly well but a friend gave me a pair of Stockli FIS SL 165 and I fell in love and my results improved significantly ... BUT I always wondered if I had the 160cm SL would I be even better because I cannot always bend the 165s - unless I am super super focused? or should I take a totally different step forward and get Atomic S9 FIS 165 or 157? Please help!
 

Tony S

I have a confusion to make ...
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Team Gathermeister
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Anyone been on or know more about the Montero AS?
@Andy Mink has. He keeps teasing with little hints but Phil has told him to hold off on the big reveal, I'm thinking.

I'm interested but not impatient because I know there wouldn't be any available in my price range until next March at the earliest.
 

BLiP

Out on the slopes
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Feb 12, 2020
Posts
1,118
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New York
The New SR95 in 176 is 1776 grams with a none metal tail insert.
I thought the metal tail insert was a high quality touch that showed attention to the small details. Sorry to see it go. I’m assuming there’s a reason? Better performance? Looking forward to reading more about new SR88 and 95 and probably picking up one of them in the fall.
 

Jeronimo

Out on the slopes
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Joined
Mar 31, 2020
Posts
1,086
Location
Maine
@Andy Mink has. He keeps teasing with little hints but Phil has told him to hold off on the big reveal, I'm thinking.

I'm interested but not impatient because I know there wouldn't be any available in my price range until next March at the earliest.
Preach. I get excited about the new stuff too but I won't let myself buy it till end of season lol
 

BmbrMcGnrly

Putting on skis
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Joined
Jan 17, 2022
Posts
106
Location
PA
I thought the metal tail insert was a high quality touch that showed attention to the small details. Sorry to see it go. I’m assuming there’s a reason? Better performance? Looking forward to reading more about new SR88 and 95 and probably picking up one of them in the fall.
Also interested in the 95 but was a bit preplexed to see the metal tail go. The strong tail from my SR105 is my favorite part of the ski - very confidence inspiring in a carve on piste and in tight/challenging terrain.

I'm thinking about picking up a 95 to supplement my 105 - debating waiting for the new model or finding a 2022-2023 on sale.
 

Zirbl

Out on the slopes
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Joined
Dec 22, 2021
Posts
1,069
Location
Austria, Italy
Some thoughts on the FIS SL after skiing them this season as a major part of the quiver…

For context, I am a recovering Atomic race room ski junkie (summertime raids on WC athlete quivers / wintertime recreational skiing of said bounty with the occasional run at glory in the local Masters scene).

My primary point of reference is the 165 cm FIS Redster S9. Set-up: X20 binding / solid plate / running .5/4 bevels. I have >1M vertical ft on this set-up over the past 3 seasons.

My initial reaction to the Stöckli FIS SL in early season skiing was pure unadulterated enthusiasm. I had never skied a ski that blended so much power with so much playfulness. I stand by this impression, although as I have spent more time on the ski, there are some important nuances.

Side-cut - this ski is 2.0 mm wider in the tip, 1.5mm narrower in the waist, and 2.5 mm wider in the tail than it’s S9 counterpart. On paper, the differential in turn radius is minute at (.1m); but experientially the Stöckli’s preferred radius is MUCH shorter than the Redster. The Stöckli can snap off turns that radius-wise are unthinkable on the Redster. On the other-hand, the Stöckli is quite resistant to being skied at the occasional GS-radius turn length, which the Redster does with aplomb. This smaller radius of the Stockli is very confidence-inspiring when skiing gates, as one can arc through even the most desperate of recovery-turns.

Longitudinal Stiffness - this ski shares some heritage with the other Stöckli skis that I have sampled with regards to longitudinal stiffness, as there is a distinct differential between tip and tail stiffness with the tips being softer than the tail. This leads to an ease of turn initiation that is unique in this class of ski. This aspect makes pre-fall line engagement a breeze at surprisingly low speeds, and allows a level of precision/control in the Redster requires higher speeds and higher edge angles to replicate.

The Stöckli tails are not only comparatively stiff in relation to the tips, but on an absolute scale seem much stiffer than the Redster’s. In turn, the Stöckli delivers an extraordinary amount of power coming out of a turn, but need to be fully and rather intentionally flexed in order to work their magic. (I skied two full days until I first accessed the full strength of the tail quite by accident, and had to stop to take my heart out of my throat) In combination, this fore-aft differential in longitudinal stiffness invites a pronounced “fore-to-aft” migration of the optimal balance point on the ski during a turn. This takes some adaptation when transitioning from a ski like the Redster that seems to have a comparatively narrow and more neutral balance point; but once mastered opens up a FUN game of nuance between pressure strength and timing. This wider range of balance makes it delightful in variable snow conditions, or during ‘recovery-mode’ after badly mis-judging a cross-rut on a race course. It is particularly delightful in full-crud conditions with a firm base. The edges will hold for days underneath the crud, while the wide balance range will allows you to work though the ‘potato-sack thud’ sensation of incoming crud-chunks.

Torsional-Stiffness - If the fore-foot of the SL “lacks” comparative longitudinal-stiffness to the Redster, it is clearly “superior” in the category of torsional stiffness. In fact, it is the combination of a certain longitudinal suppleness and torsional rigidity in the fore-foot that is the hallmark of this ski, and it’s most subtle nuance. The ease of turn initiation, followed by a ‘dagger-on-ice’ edge hold that doesn’t deteriorate with pressure or speed, and is equal parts counterintuitive and mind-blowing. Something that flexes so easily shouldn’t possibly be able to hold so firmly, but it does it VERY WELL. This translates into an experience that builds confidence in high edge angles on steep terrain, and likewise in ripping lightening-fast transitions on ice. That outside- edge will be there sooner than you expect and cannot be overpowered torsionally. This aspect of the ski develops quite a “hero-complex” over time and is highly addicting.

The nuance here is that the ski rewards ‘good’ technique and punishes ‘bad’ technique. Edge engagement on the new turning ski above the fall-line is what these skis seem to be built for, while turn initiation in or after the fall-line generates a distinct ‘pumping-the-brakes’ sensation and has the tendency to scrub ALOT of speed very quickly. For me, this tendency is more pronounced in steep/icy terrain when technique begins to fall apart.

Rebound/Feedback - In sharing the heritage of the rest of the Stockli line, there is a secret in the core of the ski that is hard to describe but is evident in a certain feeling underfoot; particularly in the sensations felt when flexing and unflexing the ski. The Stöckli responds to nuances in the pressure phase of a turn (timing, speed, & angle) that are unobservable in the Redster. The active feedback from the ski during each phase of the turn creates a form of sensory-driven situational awareness that borders on black magic. The Redsters feel blunt in comparison, and when transitioning from the Stöckli to the Redster, I find myself grasping for supplemental visual and auditory cues to compensate for the lack of sensory input from the the ski.

In totality, I absolutely love the SL, and see many more pairs being added to the quiver; albeit there are rare applications where I may still occasionally reach for the Redsters.
Sorry to dig this up after so long, but what were you comparing please - a genuine race room Atomic and a retail FIS Stöckli, or a race room Atomic and a race room Stöckli?
 

bisikaufmann

Putting on skis
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Sep 7, 2021
Posts
22
Location
Utah
Sorry to dig this up after so long, but what were you comparing please - a genuine race room Atomic and a retail FIS Stöckli, or a race room Atomic and a race room Stöckli?
Great question. Redster observations referenced are across a combination of race room and consumer FIS SL’s; Stöckli’s are consumer FIS SL’s.
 

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