Tyrolia Protector Series of Bindings

Philpug

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This thread is for the general discussion of the Article Tyrolia Protector Series of Bindings. Please add to the discussion here.
 

Andy Mink

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Having skied them on the new-for-23 Head Shape 8 and Shape 10 all I can say is they are transparent. In other words they don't have any weird feel that a "regular" binding wouldn't. They're light and transfer boot to ski fine. Fortunately (or not, depending on how you look at it) I didn't test their claim to fame, the lateral heel release. I'll let someone else chime in on that! The theory makes a lot of sense and I believe these bindings will be one of those big jumps in the industry. Yes, it's been done in one form or another before but this one has Tyrolia behind it. A big name AND production.
 

Aquila

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Oh man, I was super interested right up until the comment that it's not for people with short BSL's. As the owner of knees but also 265 BSL boots, is the only problem clicking into them? i.e. it puts pressure on the knee from the force it takes clicking into them, but aside from that, they should function correctly and still release smoothly etc?
 
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As the owner of knees but also 265 BSL boots, is the only problem clicking into them?
..and high settings. If you are running a 7 or higher, it might be an issue.
 

Aquila

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..and high settings. If you are running a 7 or higher, it might be an issue.
Oh, I see. I misread and thought it was short bsl or higher settings, haha. I'm fine then, realistically I'll never run higher than 6 in my life. My interest in them is reignited! Solid article on a really cool new binding.

Showed the article to another friend who is wondering if she fits into the "small bsl/higher din" potential click-in issues with a ~285 BSL and 7-8 DIN?
 
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Showed the article to another friend who is wondering if she fits into the "small bsl/higher din" potential click-in issues with a ~285 BSL and 7-8 DIN?
We really don't see that as an issue.
 

Wart

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@Philpug or others.

I don’t remember… so, now I’m confused. And I’m not trying to dredge up old arguments, etc… so, please let’s not go down that thread. But…

After similar homework (observation, speaking with manufacturers, test ride, etc.)…
What was (is) so bad about Kneebindings?
What is so good about the Protector?

Hopefully, with answers focused purely on performance and safety. (And not answers based on who makes them… allowing that brand loyalty can be #1 to many.)

And to, maybe, add some context for my questions. I’m a better than average skier. If I skied on a bunch of different skis I could provide a very specific review of each ski… but not once would I have comment based on the bindings performance, or lack of.
 
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What was (is) so bad about Kneebindings?
Heavy, high and a dated chassis design that goes back the Geze 962. Not Gripwalk or AT compatible. Only one way of release, requiring a left/right specific ski.

What is so good about the Protector?
Tens ... hundreds of more dealers by one of the largest binding manufacturers in the world so extensive R&D access. Release both left and right. Elacticity in the heel. Backwards compatable with previous PRD rails.

If I skied on a bunch of different skis I could provide a very specific review of each ski… but not once would I have comment based on the bindings performance, or lack of.
Hoenstly between the two binding, I think you might be able to tell the difference. Now, between, the Protector and a Tyrolia PRD, I doubt you or >98% of the skiers on the hill could not.
 

tomahawkins

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And to, maybe, add some context for my questions. I’m a better than average skier. If I skied on a bunch of different skis I could provide a very specific review of each ski… but not once would I have comment based on the bindings performance, or lack of.

If you ever have the opportunity, test the same ski back to back with a high elasticity alpine binding and a tech binding. The added suspension can make a big difference. What's interesting, aside from the safety aspects, is that the Protector introduces a new axis of elasticity that no other binding has. Is it possible this also improves handling?
 

Wart

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Excellent. I understand now.
Is this forum the best? Or, what?
 

Angus Grizzly

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Great thread. I have been using Kneebindings on some of my skis for a few years (and race plates on others) so I am very familair with all the Kneebinding pros and cons. I think the new Protectors will probably be the death knell for Knee as other big manufacturers will surely follow suit once a big name like Tyrolia gets behind the ligament protection message (nobody buys Knees other than for the lateral release - it sure ain’t for their looks!). For years I have felt that the industry was slow to latch on to a major injury issue and that Knee was a voice in the wilderness, lacking the marketing $$ to get the message out there. I think this will now change and that is a good thing. These bindings will probably be great for most skiers (except racers, big mountain heroes and maybe freestylers) and I can’t wait to get my hands on a pair to try. Great review guys.
 

Ktmdad

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As a current Knee Binding user (significant other also) this new binding by Tyrolia certainly has my full attention. At 64YO I’ve never had a serious knee injury and would love to keep it that way and this binding definitely takes the KB to another level of safety. Like previously mentioned this could be the death knoll for KB unless they update their design. Kinda sad as the existence of this new Tyrolia legitimizes their hype which I think many doubted?
Couple things
Do we have a weight for this new binding? KB lists theirs between 4.73 and 4.91lbs depending on model. Just curious how much lighter the Tyrolia will be and hopefully a bunch. My significant other (me as well) would surely appreciate a lighter binding than her current KB. This could be a huge deal, especially for women.
To be clear the stand height for this Tyrolia is actually 2mm higher than the KB which is listed at 32 the Tyrolia 34 so really a wash.
KB is also listed as GW and WTR compatible in the literature provided to me by them and listed on various web sites. I’ll presume that’s true but my boots are neither so no way to verify. Perhaps others have tried?
The release both ways, the 7mm of elasticity, hopefully lighter weight and combined with the other Tyrolia features has me pretty much ready to convert. Looking forward to more info and reviews. Sorry KB.
 

pete

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pete

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Yes, you have to wait until the Fall.
Thats mean but true, I fall often. Had an instructor did say I fall in a good way, could consider stuntman as an occupation
 

Henry

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"Only one way of release, requiring a left/right specific ski." Yes, and the hip can rotate well outward but much less so inward, thus able to relieve the stress on ligaments in mainly one direction.
"...high...chassis design...." Both my Head PRD and Tyrolia Attack13 demo bindings are higher.

I'm concerned about protecting the bone my replacement knee fastens into. Breaking that section of bone can be a crippling injury. Reckless skiers and snowboarders are more common...or I'm more aware of them. A binding with lateral heel release may be in my future.
 

pete

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Like what @Angus Grizzly noted, and @Henry seeks, if Tyrolia did a nice job on these, other manufacturers will likely follow just as with other industry safety improvements. I buy bindings with added release features now, for my skiing level I'm fine with adding safety margin, I won't notice any performance loss.

Especially if it can add a few more years of activity due to offsetting injury severity ..
 

Ken_R

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These bindings seem to finally put to bed the knee binding fiasco. They look awesome. These will replace all my Marker bindings in the future.
 

Ken_R

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Thats mean but true, I fall often. Had an instructor did say I fall in a good way, could consider stuntman as an occupation

I almost never fall but when I fall its spectacular.
 
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