Want to expand my ski portfolio...

Tex

Yee-haw!
Skier
Joined
Feb 8, 2020
Posts
597
Location
Texas
March 2020 went on my first ski trip after a layoff of 20 years, so trying to get back into this sport. Last year got new boots and what I believe are good carving skis for groomers. So now I want to get some bump skis and some powder boards, right now I'm really focused on bump skis.

I'm 60 years old, 5'9", 180lbs (want to get down to 175). My boots are Salomon S/Pro and my skis are Blizzard WRC Firebird 170mm length, 115.5 width of tip, 97.5 width of tail, 16.5m turning radius, 68 underfoot. My notes is that this is a GS ski, but the turning radius seems small for a GS ski?

Should I be able to turn these skis in the bumps? Love these skis on the groomers, but I'm having a hard time making short turns in the bumps. In my younger days (80's), I always bought top of the line racing slalom skis, and skied them everywhere, never had a pair of skis I didn't like. My style of sking bumps was point them down the hill and poll plant and suck them up. I'm too old for that now. I want to ski the bumps slow and in control, and keep them turning. I want an easy turning ski

Compared to what I have, I'm thinking I want:

* Skis with smaller turning radius
* Not a stiff ski
* More tip and tail rise
* Lighter ski. These are easier to turn in the bumps, right? I feel like my current skis are heavy, great for the groomers, and but not the bumps. Maybe light bindings too? Bindings I currently have are Marker 12xcell.
* Maybe a shorter ski?
 

KingGrump

Most Interesting Man In The World
Team Gathermeister
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
7,410
Location
NYC
If you are skiing Taos, look what the good instructors are on.
Be aware Taos bumps are not zipper line bumps like those found at MJ.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tex
Thread Starter
TS
Tex

Tex

Yee-haw!
Skier
Joined
Feb 8, 2020
Posts
597
Location
Texas
If you are skiing Taos, look what the good instructors are on.
That is how I used to pick out skis, but I would look and see what the racers were sking. If I was sking every day, I would want a more aggressive ski, so I'm hesitant to just go with what an instructor is sking. FYI, I'm not wanting to ski the zipper, I would have to be feeling really good to ski the zipper. To your point tho, last year I saw a guy, older dude like me, sking the bumps like I want to ski them, not following the zipper, just methodically, smoothly, making his way down the bumps, picking his turns in the soft stuff, complete control. I should have ran him down and see what he was sking on.
 
Thread Starter
TS
Tex

Tex

Yee-haw!
Skier
Joined
Feb 8, 2020
Posts
597
Location
Texas
Agree with KingGrump, get a bump lesson to quit that zipper line stuff. The first thing they should check is how are your short turn's to start with.
I underatnd the concepts of not sking the zipper. The fist thing I want to do is make sure I have the right ski for the bumps, and the style of bump sking I want to do. It is my understanding the skis I have are GS skis, not ideal for bumps and short turns.
 

KingGrump

Most Interesting Man In The World
Team Gathermeister
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
7,410
Location
NYC
That is how I used to pick out skis, but I would look and see what the racers were sking. If I was sking every day, I would want a more aggressive ski, so I'm hesitant to just go with what an instructor is sking. FYI, I'm not wanting to ski the zipper, I would have to be feeling really good to ski the zipper. To your point tho, last year I saw a guy, older dude like me, sking the bumps like I want to ski them, not following the zipper, just methodically, smoothly, making his way down the bumps, picking his turns in the soft stuff, complete control. I should have ran him down and see what he was sking on.

Things have changed much since the last century when SL skis were 205 cm. Newer and improver are the key words.
If you are skiing all of Taos, the last ski you wanted to be on would be a race ski. Unless you are really really really good.

No need to be more aggressive. There are plenty of gravity available at Taos.
Aggression and bumps do not mix well at Taos. Not for long anyway. Peace from within is essential. Especially for old people like us.
The older dude is skiing bumps the Taos way. Line choice rather than athleticism is key. Do a ski week, it will do wonder for your bump skiing. The Taos way.

Ski selection wise, something all mountain 85/88. Soft tip and tail.

Full disclosure: I've been skiing Taos since 1989. Spent many seasons there.
 
Thread Starter
TS
Tex

Tex

Yee-haw!
Skier
Joined
Feb 8, 2020
Posts
597
Location
Texas
Ski selection wise, something all mountain 85/88. Soft tip and tail.
I was not planning on getting an all mountain ski, but maybe that is what I need. You can't have too many skis.
 

KingGrump

Most Interesting Man In The World
Team Gathermeister
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
7,410
Location
NYC
Many long time Taos instructors have taken a liking to the Stöckli AX (no plate). Perhaps that's due to effective local marketing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tex

martyg

Making fresh tracks
Industry Insider
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Posts
1,653
Many long time Taos instructors have taken a liking to the Stöckli AX (no plate). Perhaps that's due to effective local marketing.

Big fan here. Although Alaine from Ski Mastery is super effective at getting skiers on Stöckli at Taos.

I'm a little lighter. I have the AX in 168 and 175. I think that like the 168s abit more. More postive edge engagement - whch s not an attribute one seeks out for bumps where turns are smeared.

If you want a little wider, I just skied my new Augment AM88's. Super nice all mountain ski in a little wider platform.Really though, the AX's are my everyday driver for in-bounds.

Ski weight is not a factor if you are skiing from your feet up.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tex

SSSdave

life is short precious ...don't waste it
Skier
Joined
Sep 12, 2017
Posts
2,027
Location
Silicon Valley
Unfortunately over this last few years, there have not been many all mountain or midfat ski reviews where skiing moguls is a feature focused on. Worse many ski shops are dominated by inventories of wide skis favored in bro culture without any sub 90mm models. Thus yes a wise idea to inquire herein and note I am not one familiar with specific models so can just add a wee general advice.

Read all the online reviews and searched comments you can find. As you are someone in the center of male sizes, reviews are apt to be valid. Most midfat reviews focus on all mountain skiing and tend to praise those with an aggressive higher speed style. If moguls are mentioned, it is usually limited, vague. After skiing a 68mm pure mogul ski for several years and noticing some other competent rec bump skiers that seemed to be skiing bumps fine on midfats, little me at 138# finally gambled on an 88mm midfat with excellent bump skiing results at least for my rec style though probably not a comp style. Unlike my Twisters, they actually ski powder up to modest depths well and are fine in most skier packed powder all mountain terrains though are not optimal in either, especially not in crud. So yeah as usual a compromise but a definite improvement towards a one ski quiver for most conditions allowing one more terrain options on a given day. Current thread...


I skied whatever bumps and steeps I could find, and they did great—a fantastic mogul ski that’s quick and agile while being supportive and strong.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Tex

rickg

Getting on the lift
Skier
Joined
May 1, 2017
Posts
96
Location
Euclid, Ohio
Back in the day, my favorite bump ski was a pair of K2 KVC Comp 200cm! LOL

Fast forward, I have embraced the newer technology. One of my favorite bump skis in recent years was a pair of Blizard SL Race Skis (consumer not world cup circa 2009) in a 160. Radius was about 13. Turned on a dime. Was able to carve in and around the bumps as well as ski them old school. Wish I still had them just for bumps! Alas, being in a race league, you tend to upgrade for upgrade sakes and now am on a Volkl Racetiger SL UVO. Not bad in bumps but not as good as those Blizzards!

Another favorite bump ski of late was a pair of Volkl RTM 81's, last generation before Deacons. 170 length, 81 underfoot, 16 radius. Loved that ski! Worked very well in the bumps plus was a decent carver. I thought the new Deacons would be better so I upgraded to Deacon 80's. 2nd season on them. Didn't bond real well last year, but liking them so far this year though no bumps yet. I think Volkl moved the Deacon line away from an "all mountain" ski to a frontside carver. At least in the 80mm width.

So my suggestion for bumps would be a softer consumer slalom ski in a 16-165 length or an all mountain in the 78-84 width and 170 length.

Good luck!

Rick G
 
Thread Starter
TS
Tex

Tex

Yee-haw!
Skier
Joined
Feb 8, 2020
Posts
597
Location
Texas
Back in the day, my favorite bump ski was a pair of K2 KVC Comp 200cm! LOL

Fast forward, I have embraced the newer technology. One of my favorite bump skis in recent years was a pair of Blizard SL Race Skis (consumer not world cup circa 2009) in a 160. Radius was about 13. Turned on a dime. Was able to carve in and around the bumps as well as ski them old school. Wish I still had them just for bumps! Alas, being in a race league, you tend to upgrade for upgrade sakes and now am on a Volkl Racetiger SL UVO. Not bad in bumps but not as good as those Blizzards!
I skied Blizard SL Race Skis late 80's and into the 90's, then stopped sking. I think the short skis turn me off. These were my bump/powder skis 1985, 207mm Volkl Renntigers. Loved them. I guess at some point they started calling them Racetigers..

wp1983.JPG


wp1985-2.JPG


volk 1985.JPG


I think I may try and demo some skis, which I really hate messing with renting skis...
 

KingGrump

Most Interesting Man In The World
Team Gathermeister
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
7,410
Location
NYC
If you are skiing all of Taos, the last ski you wanted to be on would be a race ski. Unless you are really really really good.

Worth repeating.

Taos bumps aren't like bumps at most other resorts. A race ski is probably the last ski most would opt for.
I free ski with many of the instructors when I am there. Seldom see race skis on their feet.
Over the years, I have only known one guy that skied the bumps at Taos consistently with a pair of FIS SL. Not many like him around.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tex
Thread Starter
TS
Tex

Tex

Yee-haw!
Skier
Joined
Feb 8, 2020
Posts
597
Location
Texas
Thank Mr KG, really appreciate your posts and comments. I don't want a race ski, I think I already got that. I love the skis I got for the groomers. For the bumps and Taos, I want an easier turning ski. I think I'm gonna demo some skis, Stöckli AX if they have them as you suggested. I'm going to first try the skis I got on the black runs that just opened up, I'll be there this weekend. But last season I was having a hard time turning them in the bumps, but 35 year ago I know I would have smashed them on these skies, so maybe I'm just an old fart and need to stay on the groomed stuff.
 
Thread Starter
TS
Tex

Tex

Yee-haw!
Skier
Joined
Feb 8, 2020
Posts
597
Location
Texas
Taos bumps aren't like bumps at most other resorts.
And why is that? Are you saying it is like all crud? I would think AL's Run would be zipper lines all the way down.
 

Wilhelmson

Out on the slopes
Skier
Joined
May 2, 2017
Posts
2,901
Really just a mid 80 to 90 ski with some tip and tail rocker will work anyplace anytime, well maybe not perfectly in 5 feet of snow or a sheet of ice.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tex

KingGrump

Most Interesting Man In The World
Team Gathermeister
Joined
Nov 12, 2015
Posts
7,410
Location
NYC
And why is that? Are you saying it is like all crud? I would think AL's Run would be zipper lines all the way down.

Nope, no crud. Just bumps. Nothing but bumps.

Yeah, one would like to think that Al's would be the perfect zipper line bump run. However, realty doesn't care what we think.
 
Thread Starter
TS
Tex

Tex

Yee-haw!
Skier
Joined
Feb 8, 2020
Posts
597
Location
Texas
Nope, no crud. Just bumps. Nothing but bumps.

Yeah, one would like to think that Al's would be the perfect zipper line bump run. However, realty doesn't care what we think.
Just burning curiosity, why is it different? I would think bumps are bumps.
 
Top