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What’s your rule about when to thin the quiver?

BMC

Out on the slopes
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803
When do you decide to sell skis?

I have two pairs with 90mm waists that I just don’t reach for - the Faction Candide Thovex 1.0 (snagged them during The House clearance sale- they are the burlier construction) and Renoun Z90s.

The CTs are too aggressive for me, definitely more of a charger ski.

The Renouns are good but I prefer a different (more playful) pair of skis that I own for conditions that call for 90mm underfoot skis.

Do I hold on to them in anticipation of my still developing ski style changing? Do I sell to make room for other skis I’m interested in trying?

If I sell the CTs, is it better to sell with the bindings or without? I assume better to sell with.

The CTs are an odd size since they’re in the high 150s. I’m more inclined to keep the Z90s… had a really great day on them with @skiki at NEG a few years ago, but just haven’t been going for them since then.
First rule of quiver club - you never need to offload skis.

Second rule of quiver club - rule one doesn’t apply when your husband or wife demands a quiver cull.

I like to have skis for;
  • Low snow firm snow - a carver. Currently for me that’s a Head Monster 83 @82 underfoot (yes carver enthusiasts will scoff but it gives me all o need)
  • An 88 for sure for everyday Australian conditions - a daily driver - or somewhere like Sun Peaks. Currently Nordica Enforcer 88.
  • A 1 oh something for powder days in Australia - pretty rare. Should also double as a travel ski (2nd ski in bag) for a non Niseko or Alta esque destination. Currently Nordica Enforcer 104 but for travel purposes a narrower ski would have been better.
  • A Daily driver for Niseko. Currently Salomon Stance 96.
  • A Niseko powder ski - currently DPS Wailer A110.
  • An AT ski - currently Salomon QST 92.
That all said, if a ski isn’t working for you, move it on. Someone else can find some joy with it, and you can find joy with something else. I regularly trade through my skis until I find a keeper.
 
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ilovepugs

ilovepugs

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First rule of quiver club - you never need to offload skis.

Second rule of quiver club - rule one doesn’t apply when your husband or wife demands a quiver cull.

I like to have skis for;
  • Low snow firm snow - a carver. Currently for me that’s a Head Monster 83 @82 underfoot (yes carver enthusiasts will scoff but it gives me all o need)
  • An 88 for sure for everyday Australian conditions - a daily driver - or somewhere like Sun Peaks. Currently Nordica Enforcer 88.
  • A 1 oh something for powder days in Australia - pretty rare. Should also double as a travel ski (2nd ski in bag) for a non Niseko or Alta esque destination. Currently Nordica Enforcer 104 but for travel purposes a narrower ski would have been better.
  • A Daily driver for Niseko. Currently Salomon Stance 96.
  • A Niseko powder ski - currently DPS Wailer A110.
  • An AT ski - currently Salomon QST 92.
That all said, if a ski isn’t working for you, move it on. Someone else can find some joy with it, and you can find joy with something else. I regularly trade through my skis until I find a keeper.

No husband or wife to demand I do ANYTHING now… woo!!! ;)
 

surfsnowgirl

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I typically wait until near the end of the season. Then I see what I've skied, what I haven't and decide what I'm selling.

I absolutely have too many pairs of skis at the moment but my SO and I have separate fun money budgets so other then him teasing me, there's never an issue.

I will sell early or mid season if I flat out know or have major doubts the skis aren't for me.

I've a couple pairs of skis I'm unsure how long they'll stay with me this season but how quickly I list them for sale depends on how strong my doubts are.

I rarely sell skis in the summer so if they have value and I want to unload them I'll list them for sale mid to late season. Otherwise I'll keep them for the summer and list them in the fall when more people are looking for skis.

My general rule is if I'm not skiing them or if they aren't fun then I selll them. I've sold skis after just skiing on them once. Sometimes you just know. I see no point in keeping skis around if there are doubts about them or if they otherwise just don't wind my watch.

I always sell the bindings with the skis.
 
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Prosper

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When do you decide to sell skis?

I have two pairs with 90mm waists that I just don’t reach for - the Faction Candide Thovex 1.0 (snagged them during The House clearance sale- they are the burlier construction) and Renoun Z90s.

The CTs are too aggressive for me, definitely more of a charger ski.

The Renouns are good but I prefer a different (more playful) pair of skis that I own for conditions that call for 90mm underfoot skis.

Do I hold on to them in anticipation of my still developing ski style changing? Do I sell to make room for other skis I’m interested in trying?

If I sell the CTs, is it better to sell with the bindings or without? I assume better to sell with.

The CTs are an odd size since they’re in the high 150s. I’m more inclined to keep the Z90s… had a really great day on them with @skiki at NEG a few years ago, but just haven’t been going for them since then.

CTs are rated a pretty fun ski. So might deliver when you get to that stage of your development or flip em on while they are still worth something. Secondhand skis are generally worth sod all where I am hence I find it FAR easier to add to the quiver and not really worth selling anything.
What is the mounting point on your CT 1.0s? I found that a more forward mount point make them much more playful and maneuverable, while still great at carving. At 1.5cm or more back from the CT triangle they're much more chargy, stable and like GS and bigger turns. This might be more for the shorter lengths and lighter weight skiers. In case you haven't seen it, see below which was posted in the never ending Faction discussion thread.

I think I finally have my CT 1.0 172cm figured out. They're mounted with Attack 13 demo bindings 1.5cm behind the CT mark. When I first skied them I struggled to stay on top of them and felt like I was always in the back seat when skiing bigger moguls and steeper terrain and they did not feel at all forgiving. On groomers they were an absolute blast. I moved the bindings back both one and two clicks and it made them even more of a handful. I had them ground flat and had a 1/3 base/side bevel done. At first it seemed to help but I still found myself struggling to stay on top of them. Today I decided to more the bindings forward. I started with 2 clicks and then tried 1 click. What a difference. Sure, they're not as stable when carving at speed but so much better off- piste. Seems like the vast majority of others are skiing the 178cm or longer CT 1.0. I'm 5'6" on a good day and 135lbs so maybe this is something with the 172cm length or something with those like me who are more vertically challenged and/or lighter weight. I remember someone else saying that they like their CT 1.0 mounted at the CT line but don't remember their vital stats. Any thoughts from the Faction collective?

Boot center is mounted at -1.5cm from the CT triangle. I move the binding up both 1 click and 2 clicks forward from -1.5cm. Since I'm not that flexible I don't know if 2 clicks forward is boot center at the CT triangle. I'm guessing each click forward or back is 0.5cm so 2 clicks forward is maybe 0.5cm behind the CT triangle.

For me, moving forward also makes the ski much more forgiving. It still carves pretty well, although it seems to prefer SL turns.

Actually the clicks are 8mm apart, so two notches would have you at the CT point. Btw, my observations were exactly the same on my 178 cm CT1.0. Same bindings. :thumb:
 

Cheizz

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If you don't use 'em (for whatever reason), sell 'em.

Don't like them? Hasn't happened in the past 10 years, really, simply because I only buy what I have tested myself (and I test a lot). Not using them can mean several things: other skis in my quiver overlap too much, mainly. Not actually encountering the conditions I imagined encountering when I bought them is the other reason I can think of.
 

graham418

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The only reasons I get of skis are
I really dont like them. Despite all efforts, for whateverever reason, they dont really turn my crank
or
I loved them so much that now they are tired old floppy hulks that no longer resemble what they used to be
 

Brian Finch

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I need to dump my SL ski addiction as most WC skis are too stiff to sink into the trench & just want to return you to center like an inflatable punching toy
was that trend better or worse in a low-rebound boot like the old XPro?

It's almost worse as the boot does not have the ability to drive the ski. If ya look at WC SL of the last 3 years it's right down the fall line and traveling the shortest distance is the name of the game.
 

GregK

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Agree with others to flip old gear when you either have other skis you like better or find you’re never grabbing a certain set even when conditions are good for that ski.

Sell the old gear early/mid season with bindings attached and buy the new gear end of season on deals.
Lots of good pictures and a good description of the ski(and binding boot sole adjustment range) and skis will sell quickly. Give the skis a quick tune or at least a hot wax and mention that in the ad. Buyers want “ready to ski” on their used gear.

150cm-165cm twin tip skis sell in seconds as you’ve got a HUGE market of growing kids that those would work for and those are a highly sought after ski. You should be even $ or even make money on the CT skis.

The shorter length Z-90 would be the tougher sale but put them for sale and if they don’t sell the entire year, they become rock skis.
 
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ilovepugs

ilovepugs

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I thought about it some more and I think I'll buy myself a new snowboard, not new skis. Heheh.

Yeah I'm going to sell the Factions - just too charger-y for me.
 

Guy in Shorts

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Promise any new skis that I buy that they will be pulled for 100 days. Most skis are kinda worn out at that point and ready to be thinned.
 

Noodler

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I think it's important in any quiver assessment, that you're controlling the "variables". The primary ones being binding delta and mount position before you decide that you're just not gelling with a ski. I have been continually amazed at how much the performance of a ski can change for a skier with minor changes to delta or mount position.

This revelation led me to ensure that all my setups have approximately the same delta (within +/- 0.5mm). I also figured out where I like to have my mounts positioned. If a ski isn't working for me when those variables are controlled, out the door it goes...

Quiver "construction" (building) is a completely separate topic. Sometimes some overlap makes sense.
 

locknload

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First rule of quiver club - you never need to offload skis.

Second rule of quiver club - rule one doesn’t apply when your husband or wife demands a quiver cull.

I like to have skis for;
  • Low snow firm snow - a carver. Currently for me that’s a Head Monster 83 @82 underfoot (yes carver enthusiasts will scoff but it gives me all o need)
  • An 88 for sure for everyday Australian conditions - a daily driver - or somewhere like Sun Peaks. Currently Nordica Enforcer 88.
  • A 1 oh something for powder days in Australia - pretty rare. Should also double as a travel ski (2nd ski in bag) for a non Niseko or Alta esque destination. Currently Nordica Enforcer 104 but for travel purposes a narrower ski would have been better.
  • A Daily driver for Niseko. Currently Salomon Stance 96.
  • A Niseko powder ski - currently DPS Wailer A110.
  • An AT ski - currently Salomon QST 92.
That all said, if a ski isn’t working for you, move it on. Someone else can find some joy with it, and you can find joy with something else. I regularly trade through my skis until I find a keeper.
It's now been dubbed "Quiver Club". I like it. I move for one amendment...I like your rules. But maybe rule one is "there's no quiver club because I absolutely don't have a problem with buying and keeping too many skis...you just don't understand....my friends on ski talk understand me better". :roflmao::roflmao:
 
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mdf

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I just recently threw away my last pair of old straight skis and three pairs of K2 Fours that I bought cheap at ski swaps and never used. I have a couple of throughly worn out pairs of Navigators that I need to throw out too.

Getting rid of active, usable skis? Only did that twice ... one sale, one give-away.
 

crgildart

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My rule(s)..

Is it in really good shape?
Have I skied in in the past 3+ seasons?
Is there a compelling scenario where I really might want to ski it?
Is it a retro/vintage cool model?
Does anyone else I know want it that I can give it to?

If the answer is no to all of the above it gets retired to the fence out back..

1700761447648.png



Another rule... Quiver inventory management. If I buy anything NEW something else has to be retired to the fence out back. So, I have to be sure I NEED the shiny new object more than what I already have before bringing it home.
 

Mike Rogers

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I try my best to keep my quiver under control.

I've decided that 6 "winter" skis are enough. I have 3 resort skis and 3 backcountry skis for the winter.

I also keep one or two rock skis for the resort (usually a firm snow and a powder one) and one rock ski for the backcountry.

Everything else must go out when a new one goes in. I sell without bindings....they usually have to be remounted by the buyer anyway...so there's not a lot of value on the sale...and buying new bindings is never exciting.

I buy 2 pieces of hard goods (skis or boots) each year...and try to keep them for 4 years.

Last year I bought new resort boots and powder touring skis.
This year was touring boots and every day touring skis.
Next year will be every day resort skis and firm backcountry
Then firm resort and resort powder.

Then repeat.

For the OP, i would sell the CTs and keep the Renouns if you want to flesh out your quiver. If you are satisfied with the rest of your quiver, I would sell the renouns too.
 

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