While we are on the subject of food...Post your meat on the bone

Uncle-A

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Well, if @Andy Mink can do it... Tonight's cook.... Yes, Lodge cast iron, over charcoal fire on a mini kettle in the dark...
View attachment 120473

Sorry, forgot to take pix of the finished product.
I like to cook salmon with the skin on, but I put skin side down first. When cooking it comes out so good that who wants to waist time taking pictures, you can just dig in to the finished product.
 

SBrown

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This is from a few seasons back, but a serendipitous event where a friend who does some caretaking had an emergency! The power went out! The freezer! Oh no! We have to eat meat now...


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Andy Mink

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I like to cook salmon with the skin on, but I put skin side down first. When cooking it comes out so good that who wants to waist time taking pictures, you can just dig in to the finished product.
I do it on the Weber with a little apple smoke, skin down after spraying or oiling.
 

Plai

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I like to cook salmon with the skin on, but I put skin side down first
I think both ways will work.
I'm lazy and want to minimize turns, movements. Flesh side first for color, then longer on skin side to get a crazy crisp skin, then oven finish. It's surprising how much fat is just under the skin.. One turn and one scoop before serving.
 

Uncle-A

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I think both ways will work.
I'm lazy and want to minimize turns, movements. Flesh side first for color, then longer on skin side to get a crazy crisp skin, then oven finish. It's surprising how much fat is just under the skin.. One turn and one scoop before serving.
Yes, just one turn is all it takes.
 

chilehed

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@Uncle-A

Okay, so at 32 days in an UMAi Dry bag I cut into the Prime loin roast I got at Costco. It had lost 16% of its weight and was severely case-hardened, which tells me that the companie's claims that you can use it to make charcuterie in a refrigerator is complete BS.

I trimmed a 2" steak off one end, photo below. It was noticeably dryer and darker than a fresh one; I didn't let it rest when it came off the grill but it didn't weep at all. At that age I'd hoped that it would have started to develop that delicious dry-aged funk, but there was absolutely none. Not the slightest.

As it happens, last week I found this post at seriouseats.com that predicted that exact outcome. I was hoping they'd be wrong.

So although it wasn't a bad steak, the process was a complete waste of time and money. The rest of the bags will collect dust until I figure out a use for them, or throw them out.
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wallyk

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As it happens, last week I found this post at seriouseats.com that predicted that exact outcome. I was hoping they'd be wrong.
Kenji knows what he's talking about. Have read that article many times...Kudos for trying. Home dry aging beef possess risks. I do my own dry cured duck breast: duck pastrami and duck "prosciutto"...a duck breast is easier than a beef primal.
 

Uncle-A

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@Uncle-A

Okay, so at 32 days in an UMAi Dry bag I cut into the Prime loin roast I got at Costco. It had lost 16% of its weight and was severely case-hardened, which tells me that the companie's claims that you can use it to make charcuterie in a refrigerator is complete BS.

I trimmed a 2" steak off one end, photo below. It was noticeably dryer and darker than a fresh one; I didn't let it rest when it came off the grill but it didn't weep at all. At that age I'd hoped that it would have started to develop that delicious dry-aged funk, but there was absolutely none. Not the slightest.

As it happens, last week I found this post at seriouseats.com that predicted that exact outcome. I was hoping they'd be wrong.

So although it wasn't a bad steak, the process was a complete waste of time and money. The rest of the bags will collect dust until I figure out a use for them, or throw them out. View attachment 123036
I would not eat it, but that is only me. I gave up on trying to age meat at home. It is not something I am comfortable enough with to deal with the risk. I wish you luck and I hope it is safe for you, but it is not for me.
 

chilehed

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I would not eat it, but that is only me. I gave up on trying to age meat at home. It is not something I am comfortable enough with to deal with the risk. I wish you luck and I hope it is safe for you, but it is not for me.
I certainly understand that, it does take care and when I began experimenting with charcuterie it took me a while to be comfortable with it. And to clarify, that photo shows it before I finished trimming all the very dark bits off.

A while back I set up a fridge as a climate-controlled meat curing chamber in the basement, and managed to make some fine braesola and prosciutto before the cooling system failed. I think I might get it running again, and give this another try.
 

Uncle-A

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Three steaks tonight and some other stuff. I think it will be some tails.
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Tex

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Still no ducks?
No ducks till next hunting season. Normally I shoot about 150 ducks a season, due to shoulder injury only shot a few this year, shot a lot of dove though. Duck I normally fillet off the bone, I would post those pics but that would be a thread drift. :ogbiggrin:
 
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Tex

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I would not eat it, but that is only me. I gave up on trying to age meat at home. It is not something I am comfortable enough with to deal with the risk. I wish you luck and I hope it is safe for you, but it is not for me.
I age duck and dove, makes a big difference in tenderness of meat. But I do not age that long, dove 3 or 4 days, duck a week, 2 weeks max. I do not dry age either, that has not worked out for me, just not enough meat there to dry age. I have never had a spoilage issue..

 

Tex

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Ok, so I see others did thread drift of meat cut off the bone including Phil, so here I go. Here is how I like to cook duck and dove. Cut off the bone. :ogbiggrin:

Mallard is the best, just your bigger piece of meat, and just to me the best. I fillet off the bone, but leave the skin, skin/fat add incredible flavor.. I like to pepper them up, age a week in tupperware, giving them a flip ones a day and not letting it soak too much in juice, but not letting it dry out either...

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Add salt befor cooking, then cook them like filet mignon skin down first on caste iron.

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Whatever you do, do not over cook...
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