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Why Suggest FIS Skis?

AltaSkier

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It seems to me that whenever somebody wants a frontside/carving ski recommendation around here, many are quick to suggest an FIS Slalom ski. I am curious as to why? As somebody that has spent significant time on race specific skis, I cannot wrap my head around this. I actually feel this is dangerous to suggest these skis to somebody that isn't used to a performance ski like this. Seems like a way to tire somebody out quicker and possibly (probably?) tear an ACL.

I ski a Head eSpeed Pro GS ski that isn't as "sporting" as an FIS Slalom as my race ski, and I ski it well. However, when the racing/training is done, I like to slide over to an all-mountain frontside carving ski. They just don't beat me up as much, not to mention, much more versatile on the hill. Moguls on a race ski isn't really my cup of tea anymore.

Don't get me wrong, these skis have a place, but I'm not sure they are an idea ski for most people as they are often suggested.
 

KingGrump

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I'm not sure they are an idea ski for most people as they are often suggested.

Definitely not for most people.
For the OP of most of those threads, they are a perfect fit. Super experts hanging out on double black diamonds all day. Always going for all the gusto they can get. :ogcool:

Most forum members take the OP's self description at face value as specified and answered the question accordingly. Don't know whether it's good, bad or simply being politically correct.
 

Tony Storaro

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It seems to me that whenever somebody wants a frontside/carving ski recommendation around here, many are quick to suggest an FIS Slalom ski. I am curious as to why? As somebody that has spent significant time on race specific skis, I cannot wrap my head around this. I actually feel this is dangerous to suggest these skis to somebody that isn't used to a performance ski like this. Seems like a way to tire somebody out quicker and possibly (probably?) tear an ACL.

I ski a Head eSpeed Pro GS ski that isn't as "sporting" as an FIS Slalom as my race ski, and I ski it well. However, when the racing/training is done, I like to slide over to an all-mountain frontside carving ski. They just don't beat me up as much, not to mention, much more versatile on the hill. Moguls on a race ski isn't really my cup of tea anymore.

Don't get me wrong, these skis have a place, but I'm not sure they are an idea ski for most people as they are often suggested.

Not always the case. Most recommended carving ski is actually 15-16 meters 70ish.
But it is good to bring this point.
One needs to be very honest with themselves and go FIS SL only if they are absolutely sure they know what they are doing, so please be realistic about your abilities when asking for recommendation.

FIS SL is not easy, not friendly, not a walk in the park, they are physically demanding, they do need attention and the driver should be wide awake at all times as bad things CAN happen if one isn’t. So choose wisely.
 

KingGrump

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FIS SL is not easy, not friendly, not a walk in the park, they are physically demanding, they do need attention and the driver should be wide awake at all times as bad things CAN happen if one isn’t. So choose wisely.

Awww, c'mon. FIS SL aren't the boogie man you put them up to be. If a little old lady like Mamie can rock them in the Taos bumps and Mammoth spring slush. How demanding can they be.

Just have to find the peace.
 

fatbob

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Isn't it more that if your focus is on piste skiing and you represent yourself as higher level then there is no point shortchanging yourself on the plethora of groomer zoomer skis and you might as well be on the real deal? Or as near a facsimile as you can find.

If you're wanting to ski moguls notwithstanding the Grumps' infallibility ordinary mortals may want a different tool.
 

hrstrat57

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FIS GS is not appropriate for most skiers, especially in age/gender recommended race lengths. 35, 40mph isn’t very crowded slope friendly either.

FIS SL depends on which ski, set up (including race plate/ binding tweaking height and position) and tune. I have a bunch of FIS SL all are different. One of my pair is tuned 1 and 3, binding forward and gas pedal installed. Just get forward and tip em and they’re like cheating.

I’ll continue to say most good skiers should give SL a go. Many will have mind blown.
 

dbostedo

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I actually feel this is dangerous to suggest these skis to somebody that isn't used to a performance ski like this.
I think calling it dangerous is taking it a bit too far. Though I do appreciate the reminder that FIS SL skis may not be for everyone... they've been recommended a lot in various threads, and it's become something of an obvious, off-hand recommendation. I think it's to the point where the context and skier-skill questions aren't always made or asked, and should be.
 

Tony Storaro

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It's been explained to me that an FIS SL can be helpful in learning technique because it immediately lets you know when you do something wrong.

Yes. Problem here lies in the “lets you know” part. :ogbiggrin: Lessons can be a bit old-school, a bit of spanking and ass kicking. Not everyone is fine with that.
 

cantunamunch

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Yes. Problem here lies in the “lets you know” part. :ogbiggrin: Lessons can be a bit old-school, a bit of spanking and ass kicking. Not everyone is fine with that.

Eh, even if are were fine with the punishment, people can have trouble distinguishing what the actual problem is, let alone what to work on in what order.

Imagine an SL with a sh*t tune under a so-so bootfit and questionable body mechanics.
 

flbufl

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It seems to me that whenever somebody wants a frontside/carving ski recommendation around here, many are quick to suggest an FIS Slalom ski. I am curious as to why? As somebody that has spent significant time on race specific skis, I cannot wrap my head around this. I actually feel this is dangerous to suggest these skis to somebody that isn't used to a performance ski like this. Seems like a way to tire somebody out quicker and possibly (probably?) tear an ACL.

I ski a Head eSpeed Pro GS ski that isn't as "sporting" as an FIS Slalom as my race ski, and I ski it well. However, when the racing/training is done, I like to slide over to an all-mountain frontside carving ski. They just don't beat me up as much, not to mention, much more versatile on the hill. Moguls on a race ski isn't really my cup of tea anymore.

Don't get me wrong, these skis have a place, but I'm not sure they are an idea ski for most people as they are often suggested.

FIS SL skis and FIS GS skis are totally different animal. My first pair of FIS SL is from VIST/Blossom, and I found them to be easier to ski and more versatile than my Blossom recreational/cheater GS skis. Vist was the only brand I saw grouping their FIS SL skis within other recreational carving skis in their catalogue. What is interesting is that I just found that this year Stockli started doing the same: (https://www.stoeckli.ch/usen/ski). These two happen to be my favorite skis brands.
 

teejaywhy

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It's been explained to me that an FIS SL can be helpful in learning technique because it immediately lets you know when you do something wrong.

I've heard the similar advice on golf forums. Use blades, they will improve your ball-striking. :rolleyes:
 

DocGKR

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I would not generally recommend a FIS GS ski for anything but racing.

In most cases I recommend a sub-70mm wide sport carver with a 15-18m radius like a Head e.Race, Stockli WRT-ST, or similar for recreational carving.

However, a FIS SL can be a useful tool for carving fun, that is far more versatile than expected--the commercially available Dynastar/Rossi FIS SL tend to be the most joyous and easy I've found for freeskiing, although I am objectively a bit faster in gates on the Blizz/Nordica FIS SL's.
 

4ster

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Isn't it more that if your focus is on piste skiing and you represent yourself as higher level then there is no point shortchanging yourself on the plethora of groomer zoomer skis and you might as well be on the real deal? Or as near a facsimile as you can find.
^This!
If I’m stuck on a small or big icy hill I would want the best tool for the job. I ski big mountains in the west but even there conditions are sometimes limited to machine made, rained on or melted & refrozen bulletproof snow. These are times when I pull out the real deal SL skis & slice & dice while everyone one else is flipping & flopping around on totally inappropriate fat rockers. They go home, I have fun…. End of story.
l recommend skis like that to people who look at skiing as a sport as much as a recreation.
As a former coach & instructor I think everyone needs a slalom type ski in their quiver as at least a learning tool.
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Tony Storaro

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I would not generally recommend a FIS GS ski for anything but racing.

In most cases I recommend a sub-70mm wide sport carver with a 15-18m radius like a Head e.Race, Stockli WRT-ST, or similar for recreational carving.

However, a FIS SL can be a useful tool for carving fun, that is far more versatile than expected--the commercially available Dynastar/Rossi FIS SL tend to be the most joyous and easy I've found for freeskiing, although I am objectively a bit faster in gates on the Blizz/Nordica FIS SL's.

A question as I know you have tested lots of them-would it be true if we say that the differences between two FIS SL ski would be smaller than differences between two 15 meters sportcarvers?
How far wrong can one go if they pick this FIS SL over that?
 

BLiP

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I've heard the similar advice on golf forums. Use blades, they will improve your ball-striking. :rolleyes:
I bought blades. Couldn't hit them straight to save my life. After hundreds (no exaggeration) of hours at the range, I started to hit them well. Not because they were blades, but because I had spent hundreds of hours at the range.
 

hrstrat57

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I would not generally recommend a FIS GS ski for anything but racing.

In most cases I recommend a sub-70mm wide sport carver with a 15-18m radius like a Head e.Race, Stockli WRT-ST, or similar for recreational carving.

However, a FIS SL can be a useful tool for carving fun, that is far more versatile than expected--the commercially available Dynastar/Rossi FIS SL tend to be the most joyous and easy I've found for freeskiing, although I am objectively a bit faster in gates on the Blizz/Nordica FIS SL's.
IMG_6997.jpeg
IMG_6244.jpeg


Agree :)
 

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