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Why Suggest FIS Skis?

hrstrat57

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like Volkl too ⛷️
 

hrstrat57

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How do you compare the Racetigers to the Rossis?
I didn’t ski Volkl last season ski’d Hero’s and Dobermanns. The Nordica have the most aggressive tune 3 .5) and they are the best ski I’ve ever been on. The Rossi are fun cruiser. Both skis are mounted one hole forward recommended and gas pedal in toe.

I’m planning on skiing Volkl and Rossi back to back this season. The Dobermann don’t have a ton of edge left so I’m planning on parking them in the closet for now.

I’ve ski’d Volkl on and off for 40 years. Mostly race skis. Smooth power is how I’d describe. The 2010 Tigers have the forgiving tune I’ve described above ( 3 side 1 base) gas pedal and mounted forward. They ski on snooze control. The new Tigers are tune 3 / .75 I’ll get on them this month.

In a nutshell I believe the tune and the setup variations in the group are a big part of the feel. I like em all - they’re all different.

oh and I play Mizuno blades :)
 

Dfish

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People are free to ski on whatever they want, and I get that FIS skis are exciting.

That being said I kind of agree with the OP, that if you're looking for one front side carver, any FIS ski is compromised. A GS ski just isn't safe or fun in a lot of situations with the general public, and a slalom ski, very few can ski well and it requires so many turns. If you wanna have a pair for your quiver, sure, have at it. But if your buying just one frontside carver? Definitely not.

I've spent an absurd amount of time of FIS skis both as a racer and coach(6x week for 13 years). I've had the most fun on that 14-17m ski with race-like performance. I demoed some head E-Race Pros and it was hands down the most fun time I've ever had on groomers. Race ski energy but the versatility to play with turn shape/size and speed like you can't on FIS skis. And the non pro versions should suit alot of people. I cant imagine every buying another FIS ski unless I end up in gates again, which I don't plan on.
 

Tony Storaro

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People are free to ski on whatever they want, and I get that FIS skis are exciting.

That being said I kind of agree with the OP, that if you're looking for one front side carver, any FIS ski is compromised. A GS ski just isn't safe or fun in a lot of situations with the general public, and a slalom ski, very few can ski well and it requires so many turns. If you wanna have a pair for your quiver, sure, have at it. But if your buying just one frontside carver? Definitely not.

I've spent an absurd amount of time of FIS skis both as a racer and coach(6x week for 13 years). I've had the most fun on that 14-17m ski with race-like performance. I demoed some head E-Race Pros and it was hands down the most fun time I've ever had on groomers. Race ski energy but the versatility to play with turn shape/size and speed like you can't on FIS skis. And the non pro versions should suit alot of people. I cant imagine every buying another FIS ski unless I end up in gates again, which I don't plan on.

It really depends where do you ski. The runs on my home mountain are of the short-ish, steep-ish kind almost always hard and icy. And crowded. I love my WRTs 180 to bits but even their 16.3 radius is an overkill as i like to carve. It just gets too fast too soon. FIS SL are just perfect for me. Alternatively-the short WRT. longer radius ski I pull out only when the crowds thin towards the end of the season or when I go to another mountain.
 
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Dfish

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It really depends where do you ski. The runs on my home mountain are of the short-ish, steep-ish kind almost always hard and icy. And crowded. I love my WRTs 180 to bits but even their 16.3 radius is an overkill as i like to carve. It just gets too fast too soon. FIS SL are just perfect for me. Alternatively-the short WRT. longer radius ski I pull out only when the crowds thin towards the end of the season or when I go to another mountain.
Your right, it does. I grew up oh a hill with 300 feet of vert, so I get it if that's the only place you have to ski. But I feel I can push a 14-16m ski into a tight enough turn to enjoy there, while also opening it up on a larger run.
 

hrstrat57

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It really depends where do you ski. The runs on my home mountain is of the short-ish, steep-ish kind almost always hard and icy. And crowded. I love my WRTs 180 to bits but even their 16.3 radius is an overkill as i like to carve. It just gets too fast too soon. FIS SL are just perfect for me. Alternatively-the short WRT. longer radius ski I pull out only when the crowds thin towards the end of the season or when I go to another mountain.
I ski’d a pair of Volkl Deacon Pros a couple season ago ( the piston plate version) great ski but as with even short FIS GS skis (183) they wanted to run and run hard. The thing I like about FIS slalom (especially the Dobermanns) is they don’t really have a speed limit. Sure you can’t park n ride - if those tails lock up it can be problematic but skiing with good technique is what we want right? Unless they’re fluffy pillows ( something rarely seen in these parts) I don’t ski bumps anymore.

The Deacons were an interesting compromise. Last decade I spent most of my days on 170 iSupershapes not sure if that’s considered a similar ski to the e Race or not. Haven’t followed Head product line for years.
 

ski otter 2

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I think a lot of these things depend on the ski, as well as the skier.
(Personally, I like Rossignols and Atomics, myself, so far - for both SL and GS skis.)

To me, the men's versions of FIS GS are overkill for a recreational skier. r 35? 193 or 195?
Save it for high speed & the race course, to me.
These men's GS FIS skis have powerful acceleration and rebound that to me fits racing,
not recreational skiing. (For a bigger, stronger, younger skier, this might be different.)

On the other hand, a lot of folks here use the women's spec FIS GS skis (thanks to @ScotsSkier, initially, in my case).
The 188/r30 for a lot of men is a sweet spot ski, with almost Goldilocks rebound and energy - at least with the right brands, right flex,
to fit different skiers.

It does require a fair amount of space on the mountain to really take advantage of, however.
Back East, during Christmas or Spring Break, not so much, at least for many.

But in the Rockies and elsewhere, if at times the slopes are dependably sparsely populated, and the snow is good, old snow,
that ski can be a lot of fun. And I'm an old guy, not big, not powerful, a bit clumsy as a racer long ago, and loving that ski, safely -
even though in recent years I'm laying it over less far each year, sure seems like, unfortunately.

The same can be said for the various Masters GS versions, say, a 185 R 25 sort of ski. It's even easier.
But it's not a ski for trees or mogul fields, nor powder/crud - mostly on piste during the week here, on off days.

If a racer hasn't been too burned out by the regimentation and sameness/schedule of gate racing,
creativity with recreational FIS GS moves and logic on uncrowded slopes around here can be refreshing, a new take on such a ski.
Basically, you vary your style to fit having fun, rather than going for speed, necessarily. A different deal.

As just one example of such (fool around?) recreational creativity, one can do rough impressions of different classic great racers
from their videos - the arms extended forward Austrian style like, say, Carl Schranz or Marcel Herscher; or out to the sides horizontally,
like the Hermanator, Hermann Maier; or using a bit of understated counter rotation of the wrists through the arms like Ted Ligety;
or trying to do an impression of the economy of movement of Jean-Claude Killy or Mikaela Shiffrin, say
(harder for me to do than the others, since it's about no wasted motion - except for when Jean-Claude did his jet ski thing,
as if sitting back in a chair while jetting forward :) ).
Stein Ericksen was another of my favorites for a GS impression, back in the day.

If a clumsy guy like me can entertain himself this way (and maybe improve my skiing),
I can only imagine how a good ex racer would handle such caricatures, and play. On an FIS woman's spec GS ski.
 

DocGKR

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"Last decade I spent most of my days on 170 iSupershapes not sure if that’s considered a similar ski to the e Race or not."

The Supershapes are more relaxed, less responsive, and reduced in power compared to an e.Race Pro.
 

4ster

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it requires so many turns. If you wanna have a pair for your quiver, sure, have at it. But if your buying just one frontside carver? Definitely not.
I totally get this & agree. I also get the small hill with icy conditions.
One of my sayings is that a FIS SL ski can make a mountain out of a molehill! If that’s what you looking for (& I am) then there’s nothing better. The fact that “it requires so many turns” is a plus as far as I’m concerned. I can always quit when they wear me out or switch to a more forgiving ski which for me right now is a Stockli AR but it could be any ski in that radius/width family.
& they’re not as sensitive when it gets soft…
20230119JForsterDSC07630.jpeg
 
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JCF

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I totally get this & agree. I also get the small hill with icy conditions.
One of my sayings is that a FIS SL ski can make a mountain out of a molehill! If that’s what you looking for (& I am) then there’s nothing better. The fact that “it requires so many turns” is a plus as far as I’m concerned. I can always quit when they wear me out or switch to a more forgiving ski which for me right now is a Stockli AR but it could be any ski in that radius/width family.
& they’re not as sensitive when it gets soft…
View attachment 216156

ME TOO

IMG_6949.jpeg
 

Philpug

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The Supershapes are more relaxed, less responsive, and reduced in power compared to an e.Race Pro.
We talk a lot about the power/finesse scale. The Supershape is on the power scale to the Shape but on the finesse side to the e.Race which is on the finesse side compared to the Rebels which is on the finesse to the World Cup.
 

oldschoolskier

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It seems to me that whenever somebody wants a frontside/carving ski recommendation around here, many are quick to suggest an FIS Slalom ski. I am curious as to why? As somebody that has spent significant time on race specific skis, I cannot wrap my head around this. I actually feel this is dangerous to suggest these skis to somebody that isn't used to a performance ski like this. Seems like a way to tire somebody out quicker and possibly (probably?) tear an ACL.

I ski a Head eSpeed Pro GS ski that isn't as "sporting" as an FIS Slalom as my race ski, and I ski it well. However, when the racing/training is done, I like to slide over to an all-mountain frontside carving ski. They just don't beat me up as much, not to mention, much more versatile on the hill. Moguls on a race ski isn't really my cup of tea anymore.

Don't get me wrong, these skis have a place, but I'm not sure they are an idea ski for most people as they are often suggested.
There are lots of posts on this in previous threads most by @ScotsSkier.

The short version FIS SL or even better Race Room versions of these skis are extremely predictable making it extremely easy to ski. Non race skis while great are built to function but they are not as predictable.
 

Tricia

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It seems to me that whenever somebody wants a frontside/carving ski recommendation around here, many are quick to suggest an FIS Slalom ski. I am curious as to why?
I do not. Those who do it on a regular basis are the same handful of people.
[cough] grumps[/cough]
 

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