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Why Suggest FIS Skis?

Tony Storaro

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I dunno, I kind of feel like there is some idol worship going on here. An S-works epic is not the ideal MTB for most riders and it would be silly to recommend it to many people, it's a racing tool. It's cool you can buy the same ski as Henrick or Mikaela,

That would be true if the recommendation was Stockli FIS SL only. :ogbiggrin: Normal FIS SL cost in fact less that many other models, unlike the SWorks so not the same thing.
And second-there is a YUGE difference between the ski Joe Skier can buy in the shop and the ones Mikaela or the Odermatt dude use on the World Cup. Or so I am told.
 

Tony Storaro

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LOL. A lot of us (including me, a 200 lb male) ski on the women's FIS SL.

And FIS GS. Especially FIS GS. I am not even good enough for women’s GS ski, that’s why I ski old people’s and kids’ GS ski…:ogbiggrin:
 

silverback

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Every time I try a “sport carver” or “near race” ski I find them lacking top end. I like the feeling of having some reserve when speeds pick up and I need to step on it. I’m trying I.speed pros this season. :crossfingers:
 

Cheizz

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There's a big difference between U14, U16, Women's and Unisex/Men's GS FIS skis. Most of them are not very useful for me (I hardly ever have the space to use them properly, and I am too lazy too).

And then there are the FIS SL skis. The difference between FIS and non-FIS SL-type skis is smaller since the radius is practically the same. In GS skis, the difference between FIS skis (R25-35) and 'consumer'/'cheater' versions (R18-19) is much bigger. Not just in build, plate, and energy, but also in radius. That radius difference isn't there with the SL skis.

So - we need to be specific about the 'FIS skis' we're talking about.
 

Dfish

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Every time I try a “sport carver” or “near race” ski I find them lacking top end. I like the feeling of having some reserve when speeds pick up and I need to step on it. I’m trying I.speed pros this season. :crossfingers:
Yea, I guess I'm saying my previous comments based on some testing I did with some Head skis last year year. I went from my World Cup stock FIS GS ski to the Head e-race Pro last year at a demo and didn't like I was missing any energy/top end/stability/consistency, etc. And you can choose the size/radius/ stiffness that best suits what you want to do (speed/race/sl and pro vs non pro).
 

BLiP

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Yea, I guess I'm saying my previous comments based on some testing I did with some Head skis last year year. I went from my World Cup stock FIS GS ski to the Head e-race Pro last year at a demo and didn't like I was missing any energy/top end/stability/consistency, etc. And you can choose the size/radius/ stiffness that best suits what you want to do (speed/race/sl and pro vs non pro).
Very few people should be on a FIS GS outside of a closed course. I've never given second thought to getting back on a full men's spec FIS GS. The FIS SL is a completely different (and tamer) beast.
 

Dfish

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There's a big difference between U14, U16, Women's and Unisex/Men's GS FIS skis. Most of them are not very useful for me (I hardly ever have the space to use them properly, and I am too lazy too).

And then there are the FIS SL skis. The difference between FIS and non-FIS SL-type skis is smaller since the radius is practically the same. In GS skis, the difference between FIS skis (R25-35) and 'consumer'/'cheater' versions (R18-19) is much bigger. Not just in build, plate, and energy, but also in radius. That radius difference isn't there with the SL skis.

So - we need to be specific about the 'FIS skis' we're talking about.
True, and on top of that some people are able to get "race stock" skis which you normally can only get from the reps/factory or second hand that have a different construction and plates
 

Tony Storaro

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There's a big difference between U14, U16, Women's and Unisex/Men's GS FIS skis. Most of them are not very useful for me (I hardly ever have the space to use them properly, and I am too lazy too).

And then there are the FIS SL skis. The difference between FIS and non-FIS SL-type skis is smaller since the radius is practically the same. In GS skis, the difference between FIS skis (R25-35) and 'consumer'/'cheater' versions (R18-19) is much bigger. Not just in build, plate, and energy, but also in radius. That radius difference isn't there with the SL skis.

So - we need to be specific about the 'FIS skis' we're talking about.

Yes. The recommendation is always FIS SL and SL ONLY.
FIS GS is totally different area.
 

silverback

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I ski my Völkl 188/30 FIS GS on occasion. Much less often than my SL skis. Usually only a partial day when slopes are empty. They are good fun but not an everyday ski for sure. I had the base bevel set to .7 and it’s been a while so they are probably closer to 1 degree which makes them pretty easy to release.

I remember a clear cold day last season on them at Alta with my son (he was on his 193s). Just ripping around having a good time. Two different people came up us to ask “what are those?”… “they look like so much fun!”
I also remember getting a little inside and taking a decent slide under the chair :golfclap:
 

ski otter 2

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One's mindset has a lot to do with it.

What changed my point of view, particularly about the FIS SL, is watching closely my older coach/ex-racer friends
who chose the FIS SL even after they had quit coaching, let alone racing. Many have real health difficulties, and
have become limited in what terrain they can ski, and under what snow conditions. Some are visibly shaky, at times,
after operations and treatments - many limiting health conditions. Some have to stay on easier slopes.
Some even have to avoid powder days now, too hard for them.
Yet they were/are still choosing the FIS SL as their main ski. With short and medium sized turns. Why?

I'd maybe assumed this was partly nostalgia. But for me this was of almost immediate interest, because
I was/am only a decade or so behind them in age, if that. I wanted to prepare for where I was heading - to keep skiing.

So then I talked to, and really listened to, a bunch of these old coaches/ex-coaches: It was eye-opening, in my case.
(And over the years since then, I've found out these guys were 100% on the money, from my own experiences on the SL FIS ski.)

They said that an FIS SL ski is not a one trick pony, particularly when not tuned to just race ski bevels;
one does not have to ski them way laid over, nor use them just to work up a sweat, recreationally.
This ski is designed to make turning easy. One can easily hold a carve without worrying about
an edge failure on the snow or a fall - really important for an older skier with problems physically.
You can trust the ski to do its work well at almost any speed, making your job easier. And if you are used to the ski,
it's like riding a bike. With a right tune it is a very restful and safe ride, no failures, very forgiving when you relax and feel it,
feel the ski handling the carve and the smoothing out of the terrain - doing work for you.

As one near ninety year old skier told me, at his age, skiing was easier than walking, and the SL FIS was easier to turn/carve
than any other type of ski, for some folks who are used to it (and tune it appropriately).

Bottom line: For someone with any race or some technical skiing background, the FIS SL ski has distinctly different modes
that work incredibly, not just that racer laid over, high speed style. This ski is incredibly versatile: it is very good and easy on piste,
and in many off piste and soft snow conditions, at nearly any speed: just a "do it all, almost" sort of ski for someone really used to
skiing it sort of well, by whatever method.
 
Last edited:
Thread Starter
TS
AltaSkier

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Bottom line: For someone with any race or some technical skiing background, the FIS SL ski has distinctly different modes
that work incredibly, not just that racer laid over, high speed style. This ski is incredibly versatile: it is very good and easy on piste,
and in many off piste and soft snow conditions, at nearly any speed: just a "do it all, almost" sort of ski for someone really used to
skiing it sort of well, by whatever method.

This is an answer I can get behind. Maybe my experience has been a little different than many around here with them? I recall extremely stiff tails which can buck you if you are not on your game. We all know somebody that has gotten in the backseat and played the ACL game.
 

KevinF

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They said that an FIS SL ski is not a one trick pony, particularly when not tuned to just race ski bevels;
one does not have to ski them way laid over, nor use them just to work up a sweat, recreationally.
This ski is designed to make turning easy. One can easily hold a carve without worrying about
an edge failure on the snow or a fall - really important for an older skier with problems physically.
You can trust the ski to do its work well at almost any speed, making your job easier. And if you are used to the ski,
it's like riding a bike. With a right tune it is a very restful and safe ride, no failures, very forgiving when you relax and feel it,
feel the ski handling the carve and the smoothing out of the terrain - doing work for you.

I understand what you're saying; it mirrors my experiences on FIS SL's as well -- i.e., they don't have to be skied like you're in a course.

That said, I'm not sure I understand the point of having a Ferrari if you're not going to take it out of first gear.
 

Tony Storaro

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It’s more like a Lotus or Miata. Not about going super fast.

1700597254690.jpeg
 

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