Your car is your Baselodge

raytseng

Making fresh tracks
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That's a bold assumption, assuming they carry chains in the first place. Coastal Californians thinks they can ignore the chain laws to begin with.

Over the weekend, at Tahoe, I saw a guy driving a G-wagen with summer tires... good thing it wasn't cold during the day or snowing... because I would have laughed my ass off watching a guy driving a $100K plus vehicle with 4WD, struggling for traction to accelerate from a stop light going up a mild hill
Yea, I'm referencing the 80/20 pareto principle. I view it as 80% percent freak out when they see 1 person chain up, and that's why then the snake ends up chaining up 3miles down the hill.
But I'm agreeeing there are still going to be 20% that will go to the front and try to sweettalk their way past controls.

None I see as a generic stereotype based on where they came from though. 80/20 still applies regardless of "californians" or "Florida Man" or "Texans" or whatever.
 

Rudi Riet

AKA songfta AKA randomduck - a USSS coach, as well
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That's a bold assumption, assuming they carry chains in the first place. Coastal Californians thinks they can ignore the chain laws to begin with.

Over the weekend, at Tahoe, I saw a guy driving a G-wagen with summer tires... good thing it wasn't cold during the day or snowing... because I would have laughed my ass off watching a guy driving a $100K plus vehicle with 4WD, struggling for traction to accelerate from a stop light going up a mild hill
I see stuff like this all the time in the east (south of New England, mostly the coastal areas): people with zoot 4WD SUVs (Rovers, G-Wagens, Suburbans, et al) who believe that four-wheel drive is an invincibility shield. Most are running all-season tires with minimal tread life, few get proper snow tires, and few realize that four-wheel drive doesn't equal four-wheel stop.

As they say: physics is a cruel equalizer.

The cars you most often see spun off into the median and off the shoulder of Interstates 91 and 93 in Vermont and New Hampshire: big SUVs, often from the cities (especially ones with New York tags). Meanwhile, the Vermonters driving two-wheel drive cars with full winter tires and/or studs putter along just fine.

Even those without the best tires do OK as long as every move is slow and deliberate. I drove in terrible New England snow for years in a front-wheel drive Geo with all-season tires and without antilock brakes or traction control. I did fine, I knew the car's limits. The only time I got seriously stuck was at a Mid Atlantic gathering at Blue Knob, but the crew helped me out. Otherwise, flying low and slow, knowing every move had to be methodical, and not being in a hurry were keys to success.
 

crgildart

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The only time I got seriously stuck was at a Mid Atlantic gathering at Blue Knob, but the crew helped me out.
I wasn't going to tell anyone about that. It was a layer of frozen rain with a 1/4" of shiny ice over the packed snow too. Only chains would have been ideal at the time you arrived. And you ALMOST made it!
 

David

"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"
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Yea, I'm referencing the 80/20 pareto principle. I view it as 80% percent freak out when they see 1 person chain up, and that's why then the snake ends up chaining up 3miles down the hill.
But I'm agreeeing there are still going to be 20% that will go to the front and try to sweettalk their way past controls.
Every time I tell the officer's I'm from Michigan they just wave me on with no chains.
 

crgildart

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Every time I tell the officer's I'm from Michigan they just wave me on with no chains.
It's more often than not tags from snowy winter states we see in the ditch down here when we get that 2" Snowmagedoon. I grew up in Minnesota and lived a decade in New York before moving here so I know what I'm talking about.

Here's why it's always a colossal cluster frick when we get a little dusting of snow here. It's usually well above freezing when the cold front vortex arrives and snow starts falling. It hits the warm ground, melts to water.. then as the cold blast settles in everything freezes up as ICE. Happens up north that way sometimes too, but.. up north there is usually sand down on the roads from the the snow last week. here, NO SAND. Recent transplants from the "I now how to drive on snow" areas think they got this. I did at first too. It's an entirely different animal with no sand under it.

So ya, please throw that iron on..
 

tch

What do I know; I'm just some guy on the internet.
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I remember visiting friends in Atlanta many years ago when they had a freak snowstorm of about 4". The entire city shut down. There were two -- count 'em -- two snowplows for the entire metro area.
 
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TS
LiquidFeet

LiquidFeet

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Three Christmasses ago I visited family in Charleston SC. It snowed 8" and that snow did not melt for a week. They had no snow plows. Everything shut down, including the airport. The roads, which some people did drive on, became monorails of compacted ice. My grandson had a blast being pulled on a makeshift sled.
 

Jersey Skier

aka RatherPlayThanWork or Gary
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It's more often than not tags from snowy winter states we see in the ditch down here when we get that 2" Snowmagedoon. I grew up in Minnesota and lived a decade in New York before moving here so I know what I'm talking about.

Here's why it's always a colossal cluster frick when we get a little dusting of snow here. It's usually well above freezing when the cold front vortex arrives and snow starts falling. It hits the warm ground, melts to water.. then as the cold blast settles in everything freezes up as ICE. Happens up north that way sometimes too, but.. up north there is usually sand down on the roads from the the snow last week. here, NO SAND. Recent transplants from the "I now how to drive on snow" areas think they got this. I did at first too. It's an entirely different animal with no sand under it.

So ya, please throw that iron on..
What is this sand you speak of? Never seen it round these parts.
 

crgildart

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What is this sand you speak of? Never seen it round these parts.
Wow you beaches must really suck! Seriously though, it's gotten better down here past year or two. DOT has a few plows for the trucks and sands AFTER ice. The brine pre treatment rarely helps though because it's often washed away by the rain that comes first.
 

Uncle-A

In the words of Paul Simon "You can call me Al"
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Wow you beaches must really suck! Seriously though, it's gotten better down here past year or two. DOT has a few plows for the trucks and sands AFTER ice. The brine pre treatment rarely helps though because it's often washed away by the rain that comes first.
Plus the people that relocate to the south are better drivers in the snow than the life long residents.
 

Tricia

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Tricia

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