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ski otter 2

Making fresh tracks
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Front Range, Colorado
All three great skis, all winners.

The length matters too. The Fischer is a very different ski at 175 versus 182. (I like the 182 much better - more character to the ski, for me.)

Funny, I have both the Blossom Whiteout (previous AM77) and the 86 Multiplex. They are really different. I like both.

To me, the MX 83 is better at on piste than the 175, but not as fun for me as the 182 Multiflex, even though both are tops.
And the AM77 is more versatile than either, and yet different enough so it could be in the same quiver with either of the other two.

Gee, skiing right now on any of the three would be something, eh? :D
 

Roman

Putting on skis
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Depends on the use of the ski. I sold mine after buying the Kastle MX83. I had the Fischer primarily for Colorado piste skiing. The MX 83 is much better at that than the Fischer while still having some flexibility.
I have a narrow Fischer The Curv DTX as a narrow carver and a Fischer Ranger 96 for my trips west. I used Fischer Pro MTN 86 Ti as my all mountain skis but it was sold last year, 175 was a bit too short and I had an eye for RC One 86 GT. My primary application would be narrow east coast trails when there is a bit more snow than usual. I’m a weekend warrior so catching a powder day is highly unlikely. I’m an advanced skier that prefers moderate speed and short to medium size carved turns. I hope my 3 yo will start skiing with me to some degree so I hope to spend a part of my time on the slopes on bunny hills.
 

Seldomski

All words are made up
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'mericuh
It works in the bumps, but not really a bump ski.

Had another great season on these skis. This included a good amount of bumps and they were fun there. I mostly gave up on short turns in bumps with these (182 length) and did more of medium/long turns through the bumps on the bank line. Had a blast.

Still hold a fantastic edge on hard pack, as long as I remember to commit fully to the outside ski. It holds great when you really commit to the outside ski. Had two trips, one with old not so great snow at Vail (couple weeks since last snow), then second where there was 20+" in a few days at DV. Ski was great for both. I had to adjust to more even weighting at DV - full commit in the softer stuff was too much!

TLDR- still figuring out how to ski in general :) . These skis reward you when you do it right.
 

Dougb

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Intersting to get your take @Quandary and @ski otter 2. I went with Pivots on my 170 AM77s and as a lighter skier (150lbs) this was a good choice for an all-mountain ski. I found them easier to carve on piste and easier to ski moguls and trees than the heavier and longer Fishers in 175. And just like the Fischer skis, I used the Blossoms on just about every condition imaginable, including scraped off faces to 6 inches of fresh powder. Both skis are go anywhere do anything skis, but for me it's just better on Blossoms!
 

ski otter 2

Making fresh tracks
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Intersting to get your take @Quandary and @ski otter 2. I went with Pivots on my 170 AM77s and as a lighter skier (150lbs) this was a good choice for an all-mountain ski. I found them easier to carve on piste and easier to ski moguls and trees than the heavier and longer Fishers in 175. And just like the Fischer skis, I used the Blossoms on just about every condition imaginable, including scraped off faces to 6 inches of fresh powder. Both skis are go anywhere do anything skis, but for me it's just better on Blossoms!
Sigh. Ah, well. For me, all three of these skis are about clean carving, not slarving, in my case - except at times in some depth of softer snow, sometimes pivoting the Whiteouts/AM77 there.

I have one length longer on the Whiteouts than you (earlier version of AM77), my one ski with pivot bindings;
and your description of its use fits mine also (approx. same weight as you), whatever the differences in how we ski.
My favorite surprise use for this ski is in uneven and bump terrain on a soft snow day, up to maybe 5".
Man, it's as good there as most good wider skis, until it gets deeper. And, again, it is like a cheater ski at upper body still, fall line turns
(with upper body separation, for lack of a better term).
That way of skiing at least used to be thought of as expert, by lots of folks, I guess.
(There are now so many different fun ways of skiing, seems like.)

For me, the 182 RC One GT 86 Multiflex, by contrast, has in between GS and SL turns with a lot of carve character,
a kind of unique turn possible, so longer turns than ideal for moguls, unless taking them every other one,
which I can't do mostly on a really long, uniform, steep mogul field, like usual Mary Jane stuff,
where the U.S. mogul team used to practice. (In almost another lifetime.)

This year I'm going to try my Whiteouts at 1 - 3 bevels, to get a bit more carving edge bite than I've had with a 1 - 2 setup -
just to feel the difference.

I've liked the 1-2 well enough that I've kept it that way (feeling probably sometimes a bit looser) for years.
 
Last edited:

James

Out There
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Dec 2, 2015
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23,796
Well the new graphics are better looking, which wasn’t hard. The new one in person is actually pretty decent looking. At least on the wall.
 

DandyDon

In the parking lot (formerly "At the base lodge")
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Oct 15, 2020
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10
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California
I have been skiing the 86GT for three seasons now out here in Tahoe, 90% of my skiing is on steep groomed stuff and have loved these things at high speeds. No doubt they are heavy, and not particularly enjoyable at moderate speeds.
How would you compare your Kastle MX83s to them? The ski definitely has my attention.
 

Dougb

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Sigh. Ah, well. For me, all three of these skis are about clean carving, not slarving, in my case - except at times in some depth of softer snow, sometimes pivoting the Whiteouts/AM77 there.

I have one length longer on the Whiteouts than you (earlier version of AM77), my one ski with pivot bindings;
and your description of its use fits mine also (approx. same weight as you), whatever the differences in how we ski.
My favorite surprise use for this ski is in uneven and bump terrain on a soft snow day, up to maybe 5".
Man, it's as good there as most good wider skis, until it gets deeper. And, again, it is like a cheater ski at upper body still, fall line turns
(with upper body separation, for lack of a better term).
That way of skiing at least used to be thought of as expert, by lots of folks, I guess.
(There are now so many different fun ways of skiing, seems like.)

For me, the 182 RC One GT 86 Multiflex, by contrast, has in between GS and SL turns with a lot of carve character,
a kind of unique turn possible, so longer turns than ideal for moguls, unless taking them every other one,
which I can't do mostly on a really long, uniform, steep mogul field, like usual Mary Jane stuff,
where the U.S. mogul team used to practice. (In almost another lifetime.)

This year I'm going to try my Whiteouts at 1 - 3 bevels, to get a bit more carving edge bite than I've had with a 1 - 2 setup -
just to feel the difference.

I've liked the 1-2 well enough that I've kept it that way (feeling probably sometimes a bit looser) for years.
My AM77s also have Pivots and the weight difference between those and the Fischers is one of the things I appreciated. Of course, on groomed runs the weight of the Fischers was never an issue.
 

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