Toko X Cold Powder Experiment

Tony S

I have a confusion to make ...
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Like many skiers, especially in the east, I find that it's difficult to keep wax on the base immediately adjacent to the edge. It's particularly a problem on the skis I tend to pull out for hard snow use. Manmade snow that has gone through freeze-thaw cycles is notoriously abrasive, and that's generally what's under your groomer skis around here.

In the photo below you see the first step of applying Toko X Cold Powder as a base burn inhibitor. In this case it's on my Blossom SLs. I'm using this for the first time this winter to see if it works as advertised for this circumstance. Toko has a how-to video on their site.

I've learned a couple of things already, from trying it myself:
  1. Less is more. It's easy to end up with a strip that's too wide. The pic shows a good amount to start with. You can always add a second layer.
  2. I get better results by setting the iron down vertically, in a kind of blotting motion, to do the initial melt. Then I make a sliding pass or two with just the edge of the iron. This, too, helps keep the band of hard wax narrow and of consistent width.
If I manage to get out on snow, I'll follow up with results.

20201115_114200-01.jpeg
 

JTurner

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This absolutely works well and a lot of people I know have done it as long as I can remember for very cold dry snow. When it’s slightly less cold this can be done with hard bar wax, one or two temp ranges colder than your wax of the day. It’s especially useful for race skis because slipped out courses can be hard on bases right under foot even with snow temps in the teens (Fahrenheit).
 
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Tony S

Tony S

I have a confusion to make ...
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Hi, any updates on your experience with the x-cold powder?
Short answer: Inconclusive.

Long answer: It helped a little, but was it worth the effort? My skiing habits were abnormal because of Covid. I didn't follow through with multiple applications. These particular skis are ones where I've historically had more trouble with dry bases. Is that because of how they're used or because of something about the base material or preparation?

You get the idea.
 

Noodler

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Fischer's multi-colored bases aren't for looks, they're for function. Note the change in base material used along the edges:

1637175403047.png


In my experience, my Fischer skis that have this construction do not exhibit the typical edge burn I see on my other skis. They don't get that white chalky look from the abraded base surface along the edges.
 

Primoz

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@Noodler not sure about consumer skis, as it's been real long since I saw some (touring/freeride doesn't count as there's zero need for this), but for race skis inserts are standard thing for last 10 years or so. Ptex for inserts is harder (and slightly slower) then ptex on rest of base. But it stands more heat and if it still gets burned, it's easier to replace it then it would be to replace whole ptex.
 

James

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Isn’t the yellow/clear just cheaper, and looks good on tv? It’s slower than dirt when free skiing. Also blinds you when waxing it’s so bright. Shops like it because people can’t see any scratches.
Horrible.
 
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Tony S

Tony S

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Isn’t the yellow/clear just cheaper, and looks good on tv? It’s slower than dirt when free skiing. Also blinds you when waxing it’s so bright. Shops like it because people can’t see any scratches.
Horrible.
I think it's fun.
 

Snuckerpooks

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Fischer's multi-colored bases aren't for looks, they're for function. Note the change in base material used along the edges:



In my experience, my Fischer skis that have this construction do not exhibit the typical edge burn I see on my other skis. They don't get that white chalky look from the abraded base surface along the edges.
I can't remember if it was only my Head SL's or maybe Rossignol SL's too, but there is a very faint cutout within the black bases that you can barely make out. It's a different type of base layer to help prevent base burn.

I think there was a GEAR:30 podcast with a manufacturer's representative and he spoke about it only being on a certain tier of skis within their range.
 

cantunamunch

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Who wants some Monkeypox?
I think it's fun.

And it's 80s retro.

I can't remember if it was only my Head SL's or maybe Rossignol SL's too, but there is a very faint cutout within the black bases that you can barely make out. It's a different type of base layer to help prevent base burn.

I think there was a GEAR:30 podcast with a manufacturer's representative and he spoke about it only being on a certain tier of skis within their range.


(if you scroll to the products page, note that most sintered PE bases are around Shore 68D, so it's not really about overall hardness)

Some of you might remember "FX Smart Base" from the 2005-2010 era. Yep.
 
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Tony S

Tony S

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