mostly wine stuff

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Tony S

Tony S

I have a confusion to make ...
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Honestly I'm not fussed about the cavaliere design - I kinda like the tones of some of the Veneto ones. And the art deco neck wrap looks pretty sharp in black and gold.

View attachment 182455

If the graphics artists' brief read anything like "Go beat labels like Ruffino for visual cues and coherence across the line" I'd say job done. *shrug*
OMG I didn't like it before and REALLY don't like it now.
 

Uncle-A

In the words of Paul Simon "You can call me Al"
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"Restaurant wine." This is a phrase I learned, back in the day. It meant, "Wine that is easy to like for anyone, even wine newbies. Comes in an attractive package. Supports a healthy markup." Basically, low maintenance for the restaurant.

More recently, "supermarket wine" emerged. It's like restaurant wine but even more so. Typically production is ginormous, but the labels, misleadingly, have (modest) pretensions.

Generally, I get along pretty well with restaurant wine. God knows I've had crushes on enough of them over the decades. (Ch. Carbonnieux blanc, i'm looking at you, girl. Sigh.) Supermarket wine is usually a bridge too far for me. It tends to cross a line - that exists primarily in my mind - from "wine" into "product." I'll own that prejudice.

This one is absolutely a supermarket package. Someone needs to get over themselves in the graphic design department, or go work for the circus. But the wine is classic restaurant wine. I'll take it. Stevie Wonder's "Isn't She Lovely?" comes to mind.

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How about some names in both categories "Restaurant Wine" and "Supermarket Wine" I am in to low maintenance products.
 

Uncle-A

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Burger Wine: jammy, forward, smooth, little to no oak.

Had a good one last night (with burgers--score!). Foppiano Vyd "1896" red blend. No blend info listed. I assume it is mainly Zin and Petit Sirah
Now we have a third category, first is Restaurant wine, next Supermarket wine, and now Burger wine. How will us novices keep up with all this?:)
 

Paul Lutes

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Categories are good, especially those that really let you know what they are e.g. burger wines.
It's the bazillion individual wines that drive me to distraction!
 

cantunamunch

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How will us novices keep up with all this?:)

Drink faster. :) The categorisation will come ...errr ... dripping off the tongue?

Categories are good, especially those that really let you know what they are e.g. burger wines.
It's the bazillion individual wines that drive me to distraction!

If each bottle is an hour-ish, you too can be an expert at only 1000 cases!
 

skiki

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Burger wine = Pizza wine, aka Plonk. As it goes plonk, plonk into the glass.
I was about to comment that I've never considered burger wine before, but pizza wine is common on a Friday night in our house. I think I'm pickier about what to pair with a burger vs pizza. Last night DH decided that a Cotes du Rhone was the right pairing for Hamburger Helper (appologies for both the lack of appropriate accent marks and the HH.)
 
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Tony S

Tony S

I have a confusion to make ...
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I was about to comment that I've never considered burger wine before, but pizza wine is common on a Friday night in our house. I think I'm pickier about what to pair with a burger vs pizza. Last night DH decided that a Cotes du Rhone was the right pairing for Hamburger Helper (appologies for both the lack of appropriate accent marks and the HH.)
Not DH's first rodeo, apparently.
 

skiki

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The lack of accents, or the HH? I had never had HH before we dated. But it is his comfort food, so a time and a place for everything, I guess? I'll never let him live it down, but the first time I made it after we moved in together, he could not stop telling me how good dinner was, the best meal I'd made in months, etc. He could not understand why I was peeved and not flattered. I had even gone to the effort of making Threadgill's recipe for chicken fried steak for his birthday (he's from Texas) and trust me, double dredged cube steaks fried up in lard and drowned in cream gravy is not part of my regular cooking repertoire.
 

skibob

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You might be talking about $2.00 Chuck?
eh, well, I think Charles Shaw is one of the greatest values in the world of wine (seriously). But my foundation is quite a bit higher than that. My "everyday" wines are in the $10-20 range. And, to be fair, they might not be as good of a value as Shaw. But, still, they are much better wines.
 

skibob

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One of my favorite words.
To me though "plonk" is derogatory. Bad wine. The Foppiano blend I truly liked. It was FAR from the most sophisticated. But it offered good straightforward joy. Lots of fruit, little wood, clean, balanced, easy to drink.

I'm not sure it was this particular iteration since it is non-vintage. But this is the brand and label:


For everyday wine, I think multi vintage, multi-varietal is the way the to go. A great way to meet a flavor profile goal w/o the need to claim details.
 

pete

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Burger wine = Pizza wine, aka Plonk. As it goes plonk, plonk into the glass.
BIL and SIL used to call the inexpensive wine for Pizza .... Pizza Red.

back when blends weren't common, seldom even had the varietal mix well defined.
 
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